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1" Rib-eyes, Thick Enough for Reverse Sear?

I picked up a couple of steaks on sale but they're thinner than I'd like; couldn't pass up the price :)

They're 1" thick, is this enough for a reverse sear or should I do them direct?  If direct, what temp?  Thanks!

Comments

  • SpringramSpringram Posts: 429
    I would cook them direct. Good hot fire and +/- 3 minutes a side depending on where the grill grate is relative to the lump and how done you want it. Just do not get distracted. Practice makes perfect, as always.

    Springram
    Spring, Texas
    LBGE and Mini
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,167
    If it's not too late hot tub them

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • ThatgrimguyThatgrimguy Posts: 3,430
    If it's not too late hot tub them
    What is that?
    Biloxi, MS
    Guild's Grocery BBQ Team
    The Grocery Cart
    XL / Small Green Eggs
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,167
    Put them in a Ziploc bag or vacuum seal and put them in a pot of water at 100* to 120* for roughly 40 minutes per inch of thickness and then do a hot sear. Gives you a red/pink middle on a thin steak

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • cookinfuncookinfun Posts: 129
    Well, have experimented with "hot tubbing" or Sous Vide as others call it.  The basic idea is to seal the food in vac-seal, baggies, etc. and immerse in hot water, with the water temp set for the desired "doneness" temp of the food.  The advantage is that the food hast a set doneness or "target" temp, and will not over cook....Then the food can be seared, etc. for the desired texture / flavors. 

    As much as I am an old diehard with Q and grillin, this made things easier, time not so critical.   desired done temp of a ribeye might be be 120F, and the water will not overcook..iff the water is set to 120.   Just sayin, am having fun and ease with the method, and enjoying...
    (2) LBGEs,  WSM, Vidalia Grill (gasser), Tailgater Grill (gasser)
  • cookinfuncookinfun Posts: 129
    OMG,forgot the most important, probably the wine.  The food immersion temp ig generally less then the Done temp, allowing for reverse searing at the end...sorry..
    (2) LBGEs,  WSM, Vidalia Grill (gasser), Tailgater Grill (gasser)
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