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naked pizza peel

McNuttlyMcNuttly Posts: 98
edited October 2012 in EggHead Forum

as a follow up to the many posts related to the topic of how to deliver a pie to the stone, I wanted to post a few pictures of the plain dry peel method.  It does take some practice but isn't at all difficult.  

First off, this is a quick warm rise dough put together at about 10am & on the egg by 1pm, just flour, water, yeast & salt.   A light dusting of bench flour down first, dough on & finger flattened, picked up to stretch & shake off any lose flour, then layed on the dry peel & topped.   Give the peel a shake after the dough is first on to be sure there are no sticking points.  Top it completely & give it another shake.  Take it to the egg where a final shake will get it moving onto the stone quite easily. 

The last 2 pictures are a different pie but I got the underneath shot at the end to show the dry stone:

 

 

Comments

  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,523
    Great looking pie.  Reminds me of Grotto Pizza from the east coast beaches, with the cheese first, then the swirled sauce.  What type of cheese did you use?
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • Grotto, you've spent time in Delaware though in this case the swirl is was actually paying homage to a New Jersey beach institution, can you name the establishment? 

    This pie was half mozzarella, half cheddar, special request of one of the kids

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,734
    McNuttly said:

    as a follow up to the many posts related to the topic of how to deliver a pie to the stone, I wanted to post a few pictures of the plain dry peel method.  It does take some practice but isn't at all difficult.  

    First off, this is a quick warm rise dough put together at about 10am & on the egg by 1pm, just flour, water, yeast & salt.   A light dusting of bench flour down first, dough on & finger flattened, picked up to stretch & shake off any lose flour, then layed on the dry peel & topped.   Give the peel a shake after the dough is first on to be sure there are no sticking points.  Top it completely & give it another shake.  Take it to the egg where a final shake will get it moving onto the stone quite easily. 

    The last 2 pictures are a different pie but I got the underneath shot at the end to show the dry stone:

     

     

    May I first compliment you on your excellent taste in granite. Secondly would you happen to have a dough recipe you could share?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,523
    McNuttly said:

    Grotto, you've spent time in Delaware though in this case the swirl is was actually paying homage to a New Jersey beach institution, can you name the establishment? 

    This pie was half mozzarella, half cheddar, special request of one of the kids

    Mack & Manco's in Ocean City?
    And did you know the first Grotto was actually at Harvey's Lake, outside of Wilkes-Barre, PA.  Went there a lot as kids.
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • Little Steven, you may compliment me.  Regarding the recipe, 4 cups of flour, cup & a half of water, teaspoon of salt, teaspoon of yeast, knead 10-15 minutes, sit it on the counter till it's twice the size & it's ready.  It can also sit all day till you're ready.  It can also be refrigerated for a few days till you're ready, in which case it will develop some flavor.  The pies here were sort of last minute so the final product was a little bready & not quite as good as it could've been, but still good
  • Tjcoley said:
    McNuttly said:

    Grotto, you've spent time in Delaware though in this case the swirl is was actually paying homage to a New Jersey beach institution, can you name the establishment? 

    This pie was half mozzarella, half cheddar, special request of one of the kids

    Mack & Manco's in Ocean City?
    And did you know the first Grotto was actually at Harvey's Lake, outside of Wilkes-Barre, PA.  Went there a lot as kids.
    Mack & Mancos indeed, though I think it goes by Mancos alone now - not sure what happened there.  I did not know that about Grotto, not really a fan of their pies - they're good but there is much better in the general area
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,734
    McNuttly said:
    Little Steven, you may compliment me.  Regarding the recipe, 4 cups of flour, cup & a half of water, teaspoon of salt, teaspoon of yeast, knead 10-15 minutes, sit it on the counter till it's twice the size & it's ready.  It can also sit all day till you're ready.  It can also be refrigerated for a few days till you're ready, in which case it will develop some flavor.  The pies here were sort of last minute so the final product was a little bready & not quite as good as it could've been, but still good
    Have you perchance ever done a fried okra pie? A friend of mine sent me a pic of one recently and it looked wonderful

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • McNuttly said:
    Little Steven, you may compliment me.  Regarding the recipe, 4 cups of flour, cup & a half of water, teaspoon of salt, teaspoon of yeast, knead 10-15 minutes, sit it on the counter till it's twice the size & it's ready.  It can also sit all day till you're ready.  It can also be refrigerated for a few days till you're ready, in which case it will develop some flavor.  The pies here were sort of last minute so the final product was a little bready & not quite as good as it could've been, but still good
    Have you perchance ever done a fried okra pie? A friend of mine sent me a pic of one recently and it looked wonderful
    Why yes, yes indeed I have done a fried okra pie.  Your friend obviously has impeccable taste
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,734
    I thought it was rather unique. Certainly looked incredible but, of course, I could not tell him that.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Fried okra pie?  Do those slimy buggers stay on the pie or do ya gotta toothpick 'em in place?

    .......................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan

    Where shootings and tap water are equally deadly

    My fleet of eggs: XL, Small & Mini.

  •  

    Fried okra pie?  Do those slimy buggers stay on the pie or do ya gotta toothpick 'em in place?
    rather than toothpicks I find that cementing them in place with mozzarella does the trick:
  • That's a nice lookin' pie!  Maybe I should get over my okra misgivings and give it a whirl.

    .......................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan

    Where shootings and tap water are equally deadly

    My fleet of eggs: XL, Small & Mini.

  • thanks, they were dusted with a mixture of flour, cornmeal & rub.  I didn't dunk in milk or egg first, just used the natural slime of the okra to adhere the stuff.  Fried for maybe a minute or two just to be sure it was all welded on.  Besides that only mozzarella and a few roasted red peppers, mainly for color as the okra brings all the flavor needed:

     

     

  • You're testing my limits!  I have an aversion to slimy!

    .......................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan

    Where shootings and tap water are equally deadly

    My fleet of eggs: XL, Small & Mini.

  • I like your pictures!  I gotta do it!

    .......................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan

    Where shootings and tap water are equally deadly

    My fleet of eggs: XL, Small & Mini.

  •  Fred19Flintstone said:

    You're testing my limits!  I have an aversion to slimy!

    nothing wrong with an aversion.  The way I see it all food wants to go in a certain direction, sometimes it's good to let it do its thing
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 15,621
    What type of flour?
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • Solson005Solson005 Posts: 1,911
    Looks like you found a good method that works for you! I will have to give the okra a try sometime, do you use frozen or can you get fresh okra in your area? I live in Oklahoma so a few grocery stores and all the farmers markets still have fresh here. 
    Large & Small BGE, CGW Two-Tier Swing Rack for BOTH EGGS, Spider for the Wok, eggCARTen & and Cedar Pergola my Eggs call home in Edmond, OK. 
  • henapple said:
    What type of flour?

    nothing fancy, just Sams Club bread flour in the 25lb sack


     

    Solson005 said:
    Looks like you found a good method that works for you! I will have to give the okra a try sometime, do you use frozen or can you get fresh okra in your area? I live in Oklahoma so a few grocery stores and all the farmers markets still have fresh here. 
    Yep, it's one of many methods - they all work, I'm a point of least resistance cook & this has the fewest moving parts so it suits me.  Regarding the okra, this was frozen - not sure I can get fresh, never looked for it.  I just happened to see this next to the bag of frozen brusel sprouts I was buying & thought I'd give it a go, it was a first
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