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Smoked BB Ribs were not smoky tasting

nozob1nozob1 Posts: 43
edited June 2012 in Pork
Tried smoking pork BB ribs with a dry rub yesterday for the first time.  Used the plate setter, feet up, then used a rib rack.  (well..the "rib rack" was the rack that came with a quality roasting pan I had.  Looked the same and works the same!  So..why not!  :)

Used BGE's cherry woodchips.  Soaked them over night.  Got the egg to 250, sprinkled on the chips, circular  as the CD suggested. I drained them using my hands.  The temp dropped to nothing and was taking quite a bit to go back to the 250.  

I did not want to put the ribs on until it got back to 250, so I opened the vents quite a bit to make it heat up quicker.  But I did notice by doing this, I was losing all of that beautiful smoke...it was was going out into the air!  Abt 30 mins or so later, it got up to 250, adjusted the vents to keep it at that temp. Just abt shut them down to do this.

3 hrs later, Ribs came out great!  Moist, tender..but not the heavier, good smoky flavor that I love.  What did I do wrong? I am guessing:

Should I have put the ribs on as soon as I put on the chips and been patient withthe temp going up to 250?

Was I wrong in opening the vents to get the temp back to 250 (losing all of that smoke as it was heating up) ? 

Should I drain the wood by using a strainer to get most of the water out rather than using my hands?

How do I add more wood chips during the smoking?

Comments

  • ShiffShiff Posts: 1,578
    Soaking is not needed, but chips burn out faster than chunks.  See if you can find wood chunks and give them a try next time.    If you want to use chips, and them in layers as you add charcoal.  That will keep some of them from burning up until that part of the charcoal lights.
    Large BGE
    Barry, Lancaster, PA
  • SteveWPBFLSteveWPBFL Posts: 1,308

    My two cents: Sounds to me like you burned up the chips before you put the ribs back on. 

     

    My third cent: You don't have to soak the chips, and, think about using chunks mixed in with the lump.  

  • Yes, chunks around in a circle not chips.  Chunks do not need to get soaked.  I use 8-10 large chunks around the starting fire area.  This gets the smoke going when you put the ribs on the rack.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    chips don't need to be soaked, and chips DO NOT burn quicker than chunks.  single chip versus a single chunk, well, sure.  one will be used up more quickly.  but a handful of chips and a handful of chunks will produce the same smoke pretty much.  and since it is a controlled burn, there's no danger of chips burning faster than chunks.  in a gasser the chips would burst into flame, and be used up.  but that environment bears no resemblance to the environment in an egg

    there are no flames wihether you use chips or chunks in an egg, so no need to soak.  your temp dropped because you literally put cold water on the fire.

    if you put chips or chunks in the center, in a vertical column up anddown in among the lump, you'll have smoke throughout the cook.

    hate to say it, but i get more guarantee of smoke from using small bits (i use hickory bark often) than i would from the same amount of wood in chunk form, because i can make sure the smaller bits are mingled in in many places.  fire doesn't always find the chunks in my case.  first chunk smokes great, because you can jam it right into the fire.  but who's to say the fire will find the next chunk?

    don't put the wood on top.  the fire burns downward, not outward.


    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • nozob1nozob1 Posts: 43
    Thanks for all of the input.  Learning a lot from all of you!

  • ncbbqncbbq Posts: 257
    I put my meat on as soon as I put the smoke wood on and plate setter in for low and slow smoking. I do not worry about getting the temp up first. I figure just more time collecting smoke flavor. I also came up with a way I like to do my wood. I put two large chunks directly over where I started the fire in the center that will start smoking immediately. I then put two chunks on top of the cold lump at the outer perimeter of the firebox. These will not burn for a very long time since they are so far away from the fire. Then when my first chunks stop smoking, if I feel like I want more smoke, I use my ash tool to nudge one of those outer chunks into the fire. You can get the ash tool through the grate without taking it off. Just make sure that you put the chunks such that the plate setter legs don't block access. Just something I like to do. You could always just mix more chunks throughout like others have mentioned.
  • EggdamEggdam Posts: 223
    chips don't need to be soaked, and chips DO NOT burn quicker than chunks.  single chip versus a single chunk, well, sure.  one will be used up more quickly.  but a handful of chips and a handful of chunks will produce the same smoke pretty much.  and since it is a controlled burn, there's no danger of chips burning faster than chunks.  in a gasser the chips would burst into flame, and be used up.  but that environment bears no resemblance to the environment in an egg

    there are no flames wihether you use chips or chunks in an egg, so no need to soak.  your temp dropped because you literally put cold water on the fire.

    if you put chips or chunks in the center, in a vertical column up anddown in among the lump, you'll have smoke throughout the cook.

    hate to say it, but i get more guarantee of smoke from using small bits (i use hickory bark often) than i would from the same amount of wood in chunk form, because i can make sure the smaller bits are mingled in in many places.  fire doesn't always find the chunks in my case.  first chunk smokes great, because you can jam it right into the fire.  but who's to say the fire will find the next chunk?

    don't put the wood on top.  the fire burns downward, not outward.


    + 1
  • lowandslowlowandslow Posts: 56
    I agree with the others.  Use the wood chunks and spread them around.  I have found the chips burn out faster. Plus, the only drawback of the egg is that it is tough to re-load chips/chunks if needed, so def use chunks.  
    As far as the temp goes, be patient in getting egg to temp and stabilized before putting on your ribs. BBQ is all about low and slow and taking your time..  I made the same mistakes when I first got my egg.  Once you get it down, you will be shocked how long you can maintain a desired temp without touching anything.

    Hasbrouck Heights, NJ

    XL Egg
  • EllerEller Posts: 56
    I agree that chunks impart longer and more flavor. As far as you temperature control, make sure you don't have any small pieces of lump covering your air holes in the firebox. To hold the temp. around 250 degrees, open your lower vent about 1 inch and the upper vent closed daisy wheel at 1/4 inch. Good luck.
  • Rolling EggRolling Egg Posts: 1,995
    Also, hickory wood = heavier smoke flavor.
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