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I think I made a boo boo.

BadongBadong Posts: 126
edited June 2012 in EggHead Forum
Smoking my first brisket. 

I have done two pork butts that turned out well.  On both of those I placed the butt on a raised grate with the drip pan on the lower grate and the lower grate sitting on the place setter, legs up (see pic).

The brisket I bought was too large to sit on the raised grill so at the last minute I decided to put the drip pan directly on the place setter and then put the brisket on the grate above it.  I went to crutch the brisket at 155º and it had almost no bark and was wet all over.

Am I correct in thinking that placing the drip pan directly on the place setter caused the liquid to evaporate too quickly and therefore steam the brisket?

Comments

  • robnybbqrobnybbq Posts: 1,817
    Yes.  I believe you need to have a space between the plate setter and the drip pan.  That's what those 3 green ceramic pieces are for. 

    _______________________________________________________________
    LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


    Garnerville, NY
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    or if you can't find the "green things".   Take a couple of pieces of foil, roll them into cylinders and place between the drip pan and the platesetter.

    I have 3 flattened balls of foil that I use between the platesetter ( legs down in this case ) and the pizza stone.

    Cookin in Texas
  • liquidicemliquidicem Posts: 48
    Some people use copper Tee pipe fittings under the drip pan as well.  Really anything that won't burn or melt to give you some air space will work.
  • BadongBadong Posts: 126
    "3 green ceramic pieces" ???
    Did I lose something?
  • ShedFarmShedFarm Posts: 499
    "3 green ceramic pieces" ???


    Did I lose something?

    They're talking about the Big Green Egg ceramic feet. They used to come with the small, medium and large Eggs, but are no longer provided, since they switched to selling "table nests" as a separate accessory.
    BJ (Powhatan, VA)
  • robnybbqrobnybbq Posts: 1,817
    They come with the egg.

    _______________________________________________________________
    LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


    Garnerville, NY
  • yellowdogbbqyellowdogbbq Posts: 374
    I always place my drip pan on top of the plate setter and put a little water in it to keep the drippings from burning.  Always have great bark.  Not sure what happened on your cook?  How was the bark when it was finished?  The 3 ceramic feet are for placing under your egg (large or smaller) to create an air gap between it and your table. 
  • Yes.  I believe you need to have a space between the plate setter and the drip pan.  That's what those 3 green ceramic pieces are for. 
    They come with the egg.
    Those are actually feet to put under your egg not in your egg
  • robnybbqrobnybbq Posts: 1,817
    Now that makes sense.  Someone told me HERE they were for the indirect piece.  That would explain the shape.

    _______________________________________________________________
    LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


    Garnerville, NY
  • BYS1981BYS1981 Posts: 2,090
    Yeah the feet are for holding your egg directly on ground, or on a table. Also not all eggs come with feet now. I have read here some dealers claiming feet are being phased out?
  • BadongBadong Posts: 126
    It developed some bark later in the cook but very little smoke ring.  The flat reminded me of meat that has been boiled.  Overall I would give it a solid "meh".  My guests were happy so that's something.  Can't wait to try again.  I don't think I'm going to crutch it next time . . .
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    you don't need any liquid in the pan either.

    drippings don't truly 'burn' like we think.  sure, you're left with those black foam carbon puffballs, but they really are homemade charcoal  all the stuff is driven off under heat and with no oxygen, and you are left with carbon.  what you get when something burns looks pretty much the same, but it's not like they sit therte burning and making acrid smoke.

    you'd sure think it by looking at what's left, but i'm not so sure it's as bad as we imagine.
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • BadongBadong Posts: 126
    I just didn't like the look of the meet after 6 hours, it was wet and slimy.  That's what made me think it was being steamed.
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