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Stike or other dry aging aficionados

FxLynchFxLynch Posts: 433
edited May 2012 in EggHead Forum
I watch the BBQ pit boys on youtube partly for the hilarity, and partly because they do have some interesting ideas.  I just saw this video where they "dry age" some steaks.  I know most people here say you dry age the primal, not individual steaks, plus on the video they cut off the fat that was dry aging.

So just wanted to know, would doing this the way they do in the video be at all a "dry aged steak"?  Even worth trying for someone who has never tried a dry aged steak?

Not looking to start a big debate, just wondering if a person only wanted to make the investment of a couple steaks, would it even be worth trying?

Here is the video link 

TIA
Frank

Comments

  • What I really want to know is, "how do you dry age a beef tongue?" ;-)
    I finally took the plunge and bought my large Big Green Easter Egg from Roswell Hardware in Roswell, GA 03/31/2012
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    It is dry aging in as much as a fiberglass aftermarket body bolted to a volkswagen frame is a vintage porsche. Meaning, the guy doing it, and enjoying it is happy, and feels comfortable bragging about it. But the guy who has a real one, and knows the ins and outs, is nodding politely at the other guy the whole time thinking 'sorry. Not even remotely close'

    Is that snobbery? Depends what side of the line you find yourself, and whether you are comfortable there.

    For me, the vey concept of 'aging' means there's a good chunk of time involved. Even 21 days is only a start. A week is nothing. Took longer than a week to get that steak to market, and no one would slap a sticker on supermarket beef and call it aged just for the time required to get it to your supermarket

    As for trimming. I'll be blunt. If you dont like the taste and texture of the dried exterior, then you don't like dry aged beef. And THAT'S FINE.

    But leaving a steak for a couple days in your fridge isn't aging. No more than leaving grapes in the fridge for a few days turns them to raisins

    If a week in the fridge is dry aging, then all your eggs are fine dry aged eggs.

    Primals. Low temps. No towels. Time. No trimming

    Some of those steps have caveats, sure. But not many, and not substantial ones.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • FxLynchFxLynch Posts: 433
    Richard- nicely played sir lol

    Stike- I figured as much, just wanted to get your input on it. I'll have to wait till I have a spare fridge and give real dry aging a go.  
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    No need for the spare fridge. Opening and closing won't affect things. Spare fridge might be ideal, but other than placating the wife, not absolutely necessary

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • FxLynchFxLynch Posts: 433
    Yeah the better half is my worry, only due to the aroma.  She might be ok with it for 1 week or so, but not 3 weeks plus.  
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    No aroma. Unless you are doing it wrong
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    (cant edit via mobile site)
    ...no significant aroma. Slight sweet smell. And lessens the longer you go
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    Sorry. Meamt to add that you could always fall back on the drybag system for dry aging. Not in my bag of tricks, but some prefer it
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,589
    So strike, if I got to my local grocery store and get a 14ounce ribeye. Comes in the plastic and styrofoam bottom I just put in back of fridge as is for 3 weeks or so?

    Or if I get it from local meat market and they have in plastic and wrapped in the white paper, something by just sitting for approx. 3 weeks?
    Boom
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,589
    And how long is to long? Or becomes unsafe if I cook my steaks rare-med rare.

    Thanks
    Boom
  • FxLynchFxLynch Posts: 433
    Stike- thanks for the info, I've been reading a lot of your information posted in various threads about aging, perhaps I should just give it a go.  
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    @fan0ffanboys:
    Primals. Low temps. No towels. Time. No trimming

    if you don't want to do that, you can still wet age. leave the thing in the package as long as you dare.
    how long until it becomes unsafe?  i dunno.  i've gone as much as 100 days. quality is an issue after 45 days i think.  return on time invested starts to plateau or tend downward.  i think 45 days is peak. 60 to 100 days is intense beef and aged flavor, but getting much drier.  not a bad thing, unless you are expecting some magical juicey steak despite evaporating moisture after 100 days.  those two things are mutually exclusive.

    safety is a whole other concept that needs to be understood.  your steak isn't going to have fecal bacteria IN it.  so eat it rare if you want.  heck, i made carpaccio (raw) from my 100 day steak.  if a steak is unsafe, cooking it wouldn't make it better anyway



    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,588
    I am only 5% the man you are Stike.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • FanOfFanboysFanOfFanboys Posts: 1,589
    I think I'll buy one from store and try for 3 weeks, see if I want to go longer.

    Thanks!
    Boom
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    edited May 2012
    fan of fanboys...
    just to reiterate.  leaving it in the package is wet aging.  sorta.  those plastic foam trays are still only  covered with oxygen permeable plastic.  true wet aging would be in the cryo or vacuum packed yourself (a steak)

    DRY aging requires at least a roast-sized chunk of beef. preferably a whole (sub)primal, like a rib eye (bone in or not)

    as always... if you haven't ever had aged beef (wet or dry), the first time you have it shouldn't be home-grown.  you won't know what to expect, what to watch out for, or even if it went wrong or right)

    i broke my own rule on a country ham i aged for a year.  it was either spectacular perfectly done, and a masterpiece, or i totally screwed it up.  i should have had a legit one, so that i could understand the 'fuss', the process, and the goal.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • cssmd27cssmd27 Posts: 132
    Stike - you are sharing some great advice there! My top butcher custom dry ages and custom cuts anything I want. IMO, you are spot on with your # of days. I've topped out at 60 days, but I think things were heading a little over the top. I prefer 47-50 days for me.

    As far as juiciness, all this meat is Prime (+), so it's marbled so much that the fat becomes its juice. Grat stuff!
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