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Time Estimate - Leg of Lamb

MikeP624MikeP624 Posts: 292
edited May 2012 in EggHead Forum

I am cooking a 5.75lb bone-in leg of lamb.  I was thinking i would do a quick sear and then cook it at 375 - indirect heat.  I want to pull it off at an internal temp of about 130ish.  Does anyone have a time estimate?

I know you cook to temp, just want to make sure i start it close to the right time.

Comments

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    might not want to sear.  it's surrounded by a fine layer of fat, and fat doesn't sear, it burns.  lamb fat especially is no good when it burns.

    i do it at 400 or so for easter.  it can take an hour to an hour and a half to hit 130-135.  not exact, but you will want to rest it anyway, and that gives you a little make-up time as far as the schedule goes

    you might notice some slippery membranes and loose fat tags on the thing.  trim those off, if you want to clean it up a bit.  there's some thicker fat on it too.  you might wanna pare it down to a thinner more even layer, but not get rid of it entirely
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • MikeP624MikeP624 Posts: 292

    Okay, thanks.  I will skip the sear and increast the heat to 400.  Do cook the leg  direct, indirect, raised? 

    The butcher trimmed it up a bit for me, but still left some fat so it should be good to go as is.

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    try it at your 375.  i only went 400 because i had two hams resting, and wanted to do a hurry-up.  the higher heat also blasts a bit more heat, so even though i had a rare center, i still had a lot of more done meat for the general populace (who prefers sacreligiously overdone lamb).

    if you like rarer meat, stay lower, longer.  heck, i do my prime rib at 250.  still get a great crust, and the eveness is much better (more rare across the whole cross section)
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,851
    When i did it for Easter I did it indirect with a pan raised on the plate setter(to avoid burning).
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    yeah. lotta dripping fat. good point.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • MikeP624MikeP624 Posts: 292

    Thanks for the advice.  Lamb turned out great.  Ended up going indirect at just a tad under 400 degrees till i got an internal temp of 135.

    Only issue was that the midde was a bit under done.  But i think that had to do with the placement of my thermometer.  I think i put it to far away from the bone.  But there was plenty of properly cooked (medium to medium rare) meat for dinner.  I just sliced off the good parts, and reasoned and thru it back on.  Used the part i had to throw back on for gyros the next day.

  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,851
    Very cool.
    I know I keep reading not to let the thermometer touch the bone, but if its too far away, I get the same results you did. Under cooked.
    The family dog appreciates it though. ;)
    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
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