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Country Ribs ?

bschroedbschroed Posts: 29
edited October 2011 in Pork
I just got my Egg 2 weeks ago, and put on 4 country ribs. I did not use the plate setter, just put ribs in a rib holder sitting on foil on the grate , and cooked for 2 hours 15 min. at around 300-325. They turned out tasty , but terribly tough. What did I do wrong? Or could it have just been the meat ?

Comments

  • I would suggest 2 things that helped me.  First be sure you remove the inside membrane from the ribs.  Secondly, 250 degrees a little longer I believe will add the tenderness you are looking for. Doing these worked well for me 
  • I don't think country ribs have a membrane.  Can't say I've ever seen it.  But indeed, a longer cook at a lower temperature would be the way to go.  Think pork butt.
    The Naked Whiz
  • i would treat country ribs more like a pork chop.  they really aren't ribs.

    brine them for say 6 hours, put on your favorite rub, put a sear on them close the lump, put in your platesetter to lower the roasting temp, and then roast until 140 internal temp.
    Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of congress; but I repeat myself - Mark Twain
    aka Frank from Houma eggin in Corpus Christi
    Geaux Tigers - Who Dat
  • Country style ribs are just a pork butt that have been sliced up. Need low and slow but even then they tend to dry out unless you foil them
    Rich
  • More info on country ribs

    http://www.porkbeinspired.com/Cut_Country-StyleRibs.aspx#


    Description:
    Country-style ribs are
    cut from the sirloin or rib end of the pork loin. The meatiest variety
    of ribs, country-style ribs are sold either as “slabs” or in individual
    servings. These pork ribs are perfect for those who want to use a knife
    and fork.

    Ribs are commonly prepared with either “wet” or “dry.”
    Ribs rubbed with a mixture of herbs and spices are called dry ribs.
    Such rubs can be applied just before barbecuing. Ribs basted with sauces
    during the barbecuing process are called wet ribs. For best results,
    brush ribs generously during the last 30 minutes of cooking.
    Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of congress; but I repeat myself - Mark Twain
    aka Frank from Houma eggin in Corpus Christi
    Geaux Tigers - Who Dat
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