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What's everyone use for starters?

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Comments

  • Another thing folks may want to consider is the availability of certain fuels.

    According to this website (but who knows as to the validity or not):

    http://www.protoolreviews.com/reviews/plumbing/bernzomatic-bz9400qfk-quickfire-hand-torch

    They talk about the different types of fuels, and where the industry is going. I'll quote:

    "So for us one of the first question we had to ask was why a new fuel? Maybe the best way is to give a little history lesson on hand torch fuels. Propane for a hand torch fuel has been around for a long time. Propane is made from refined crude petroleum and natural gas. It is relatively inexpensive, but it is considered a slow heat source when it comes to heavy duty soldering work since it has a lower flame temperature. Propane is often the choice for the homeowner or do-it-yourselfer because it works well for small projects, is readily available and is cheap. Flame temperature in air is 3450 deg F.

    The next hand torch fuel is MethylAcetylene ProPadiene or MAPP gas for short. This gas is made from combining liquefied petroleum and Methylacetylene-Propadine. MAPP gas produces a hotter flame than propane which makes it a better choice for heating, brazing, soldering and flame hardening applications. The biggest disadvantage of MAPP gas is that it costs about double to triple what propane costs. MAPP gas is being phased out in industry because one of the gasses in the mix, propadiene, is becoming more valuable to the plastics industry than the metal working industries. Flame temperature in air is 3650 deg. F.

    So that brings us to the new fuel that BernzOmatic is using called Max Power Propylene fuel or MAP-Pro as it is sometimes called. This new fuel is a mixture of propane and propylene gases. MAP-Pro has nearly the identical burning temperatures to MAPP gas and is now widely available. Flame temperature in air is 3600 deg. F"
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • BotchBotch Posts: 4,242
    Question for you torch users:  I seem to remember reading somewhere that using a torch can cause embers and sparks to fly up.  Are they safe to use when your Egg is sitting on a wooden deck?  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Hillbilly-HightechHillbilly-Hightech Posts: 966
    edited August 2011
    Question for you torch users:  I seem to remember reading somewhere that using a torch can cause embers and sparks to fly up.  Are they safe to use when your Egg is sitting on a wooden deck?  
    Hmmmm... well, I hesitate to answer, because if I say "yes, it's safe" and then you proceed to burn your house down... well... you know...

    at any rate, yes, sparks do fly - in my "Eggsperience" this happens mostly with NEW lump. Once the lump has been lit once or twice, the sparks are not so much an issue.

    My technique involves the Quickfire torch, a pair of welding gloves, and an old set of fireplace bellows.

    I use the same "reach in but keep your face away" position as I do when I'm using jumper cables to jump start a battery on a car. You don't want to lean in w/ your face over the coals (or the battery, for that matter) as you could get a face full of glowing embers (or battery acid).

    Sparks do fly, but if your welding gloves are long enough, and/or if you wear a long sleeve shirt, and/or if you have a decent threshold for pain (meaning, you've welded or used a torch before & you're used to getting hot bits of metal on you so you know what it feels like & aren't freaked out by it) - then I think you'll be OK.

    As far as the lighting technique - I then concentrate on 3 spots where I let the torch flame sit in 1 general area for about 20 seconds (if looking down at the lump, think Noon, 4:00, and 8:00). During that time, I'll slowly move it up & back along a 2-3" "path" along the specific piece of lump.

    Then, after about 20 seconds, I'll move to the next area of the Egg (I usually like to light in 3 places - 2 toward the front sides, and 1 toward the back).

    Then, I place my hand over the Egg to "feel" if there is sufficient heat being generated. If not, I may use the bellows, and/or turn the torch on to the same 3 places for a "re-light." If so, then I know I've got a good light, and then I'll stir the lump to distribute the burning coals.

    This is NOT based on any "scientific" study or anything, it's just the technique I've found to work for me.

    Anyway, I don't know why I just went off on a tangent about my lighting technique - but to get back to your question - I figure if you use PROPER safety procedures & good old common sense, and you are vigilant and AWARE of any flying embers, and you make sure you put them out if any do escape & land on the wooden deck - you MIGHT be OK...

    But again, this is NOT a scientific analysis saying you will NOT burn down your house - use at your OWN risk!!

    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • LDDLDD Posts: 1,225
    papertowel/oil
    context is important :)
  • BotchBotch Posts: 4,242
    Anyway, I don't know why I just went off on a tangent about my lighting technique... 
    I'm glad you did, you just saved me the expense of a torch; I'll continue on with my paraffin starters...  ;)
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Hillbilly-HightechHillbilly-Hightech Posts: 966
    edited August 2011
    I'm glad you did, you just saved me the expense of a torch; I'll continue on with my paraffin starters...  ;)
    ******
    hehehe... not sure if you're inferring that it's dangerous to use the torch, or that it takes a long time - it actually took me a LOT longer to write the description than to physically light the Egg.

    I used to use the paraffin starters & there's absolutely nothing wrong w/ them. But when I first tried the torch, I found that I could have the Egg lit & already starting to heat up in just a couple minutes (3 places x 20 seconds per place = 60 seconds).

    Anyway, sorry for the long drawn out explanation earlier, sometimes I can be too wordy...

    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • At the beginning I was using fire starter cubes, but didn't like the flavor.

    I switched to a chimney starter with newspaper then switched to oiled paper towel.

    The latest method is to still use the chimney starter, but I set it over the side burner on my gas grill and it is completely glowing red in about 10 minutes. Dump it in the egg and go. I am now trying to figure out how to mount a side burner to my egg table.
  • SpoonSpoon Posts: 328
    The latest method is to still use the chimney starter, but I set it over the side burner on my gas grill and it is completely glowing red in about 10 minutes. Dump it in the egg and go.



    Watch out I melted the side burner on my Weber Summit 6 burner that way. :-q
    "Pork so tender you can pull it with a spoon." ~Spoon
  • DrZaiusDrZaius Posts: 1,481
    I like the side burner idea!  I use a torch most of the time but I do have a chimney starter as backup when I am between fuel tanks for the torch.
    This is the greatest signature EVAR!
  • I've used the BGE starter cubes and they didn't cut it for me, I picked up a pack of "Weber"  brand starter cubes (pk of 24) for 3.99 a Lowe's and they burn and work great!
     
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 2,663


    I wear eye protection when using my torch. Also, mine has
    a hose...approx 3 feet long so my MAPP tank stays propped up straight on my
    table when I light. Actually, I set my tank sit in my Webber Chimney on my
    table. lol. As for sparks/embers, yea, sometime more or less than others there
    will be some stuff flying out.  I have never
    have seen anything large enough to start a fire on wood though. Maybe if one
    flew off into dry pine straw or something.

    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
    What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat
  • ribmasterribmaster Posts: 209

    I use electric coil but keep the starter cubes on hand for powere outages.

    I alos use a chimmey with a brown paper bag when I want a searing fire.

    I grill therefore I am.....not hungy.
  • Looftlighter! :)

  • Amy S.Amy S. Posts: 70
    Cool. I  didn't know what a looftlighter was.    
  • SpoonSpoon Posts: 328
    @Amy S That's a video from one of our own Don Marco. He posts here, "over there" and on the Steve Raichlen forum I visit.
    "Pork so tender you can pull it with a spoon." ~Spoon
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