Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Has anyone figured out a use for lump ash?

OconeeDawgOconeeDawg Posts: 148
edited 5:01PM in EggHead Forum
I have a big bucked of ash that I have been collecting. Anyone know of a good use for it?

Comments

  • MaineggMainegg Posts: 7,787
    blueberry bushes LOVE it :)
  • works well in my compost pile.
  • skihornskihorn Posts: 600
    I have just dump them off my deck into the flower beds below. However, I am no horticulturist. I may be slowing killing the bushes for all I know.

    Freddie
    League City, TX
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,203
    Works great in my herb garden, Basil, rosemary, garlic chives, mint, lemon grass thyme and a few others.
  • atlpatsatlpats Posts: 102
    I've been wondering what I could use it for. I'll probably mix some into the soil in my garden, save some for future blueberry bushes and maybe toss some into the compost. Thanks for the tips!
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,203
    I don't even mix it in, just sprinkle over the top soil. Maybe I should mix?
  • Austin  EggheadAustin Egghead Posts: 3,834
    Wood ash is basic, so if you live in a area where the soil is acid add the ash to the soil.. If I remember my basic biology most plant like a pretty neutral soil. I live on a limestone rock (very basic) and I put my ash in the flower bed and nothing has croaked so far. Me thinks the amount of ash generated isn't enough to make any difference.
    Large, small and mini now in Rowlett Tx
  • TRPIVTRPIV Posts: 278
    So if you add wood ash to the mix, you get soil with high PH. Excellent to know!

    My wife's blue berries may just survive after all. :)
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 1,116
    Blueberry bushes like acid type or low ph soil. Ash is good in the garden though. Just make sure that their are no live coals in it. My dad caught my stockpile of leaves that I use for mulch on fire along with 2 or 3 pine trees.
  • asianflavaasianflava Posts: 313
    Austin Egghead wrote:
    Wood ash is basic, so if you live in a area where the soil is acid add the ash to the soil.. If I remember my basic biology most plant like a pretty neutral soil. I live on a limestone rock (very basic) and I put my ash in the flower bed and nothing has croaked so far. Me thinks the amount of ash generated isn't enough to make any difference.

    With all the limestone in Austin, it's probably the last thing you'd pout in the soil. I used to put Miracid on my plants when I lived there.
  • Wait, wood ashes on blueberry bushes? No way! Blueberries need aggressively acidic soil to do well; the soil should be so acidic that if you were to cut your finger and stick it in the ground, the acid would hurt.

    Ashes are so basic that you probably don't want to use them unless your soil is already too acidic to grow in. Composting tends to neutralize the pH of whatever you put into it, but I wouldn't just sprinkle it on the garden unless I had a very specific need.

    See this article for more info:

    http://www.gardensalive.com/article.asp?ai=749
  • THATHA Posts: 189
    You guys are missing a great use for it. I love home made hominy.
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,203
    Now that you have some of our attention, what is the secret recipe?
  • It's great for amending garden soil.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.