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Tagine on my XL

PineyWoodsBrewerPineyWoodsBrewer Posts: 108
edited 2:04PM in EggHead Forum
Think of a tagine as a Moroccan crock pot.
IMG_9088_edited-1.gifIMG_9091_edited-1.gifIt was a real close fit. IMG_9097_edited-1.gif

Comments

  • EmandM'sDadEmandM'sDad Posts: 648
    What if you turned the platesetter upside down? BTW, what's in the tagine? Looks great!
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,772
    Dude, I'm not a clean freak but that is one dirty Egg. :laugh:

    Tight fit with your tagine for sure.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,566
    Looks good. What are you cooking? Are there any benefits to a tagine, versus say a cast iron dutch oven?

    I agree with Darian. Looks like your Daisy Wheel could use some cleaning.

    Rowlett, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • I didn't put a lot of thought into how I put the platesetter in. I didn't think it would be that close until I lowered the lid. The dish has chunks of pork loin, onions, olives, peppers, sweet potatoes and I forget what all else.
  • Dirty?? I prefer the words, 'well seasoned'.... :)
  • The benefits are in regards to the shape of the tagine. Same theory as with the BGE, the lid's shape does something to the magic of keeping in the flavors and moisture.... I'm not sure I understand the 'phonetics' of the theory, but I know it works. The clay gives is an 'earthy' taste as well. It won't stand direct flame, or temps above 350*, so it's a low and slow cooking vessel.
  • asianflavaasianflava Posts: 313
    Yep, time for a high temp burn off.
  • looks cool....but i'm trying to figure out what is the benefit of putting the tagine inside of the egg like that?? ...the tagine is a sealed unit right? ...so you are not going to get any of the flavors of the egg imparted into the food in the tagine, so you might as well be using your oven, unless you are going for temps in excess of those achievable in your oven ..

    also, your egg is already like a tagine, i.e. a moisture retaining 'clay' vessel cooker ....so you can pretty much achieve the same results as the tagine with an open clay pot inside the egg but then getting some of the flavors of the charcoal, etc. . ..
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,772
    It still looks cool in the Egg but good points.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • MemphisQueMemphisQue Posts: 610
    That's cool. I have not seen that before.
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,670
    Max,

    I actually did a bunch of lamb shanks on Saturday. There were too many to fit in the tajine so I did half in the tajine and half in a le Creuset French oven. They were done on two separate eggs but other than that everything was identical. The tajine ones pulled back a lot more and were more tender.

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • but which ones had the better flavor?? you could have always covered/sealed the ones in the le creuset for the last part of the cook to get the same tenderness. ..i'm just saying, if you stick something in the egg in a totally sealed environment from beginning to end, you have completely defeated the purpose of using the egg in the first place...

    i at least start a dish like shanks or ox tails or short ribs in the open in my eggs for an hour or so, then seal them up...get some smoke/egg magic into them first ...best of both worlds
  • AngelaAngela Posts: 540
    Traditionally tagine is not cooked in an enclosed oven, but over coals. The lid is supposed to stay cooler than the bottom.

    I love my tagines, I have both unglazed tagines and Emile Henry glazed flameware.
    Egging on two larges + 36" Blackstone griddle
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,670
    But it is not beginning to end. The braise is sealed but all the prep is open. I should say that on mine it is because it is ceramic and can take higher temps. Don't think I didn't notice that the Caps put a dagger into the Leafs last night either.

    http://www.eggheadforum.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=1062719&catid=1

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • LOL. .leafs were out of the playoffs before the game went to OT...oh well...leafs have a bright future!!...lots of upside there, especially in goal!
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,670
    Depending what happens in the off season they could be a good team next year. This is the first time I have felt optimistic after getting closed out of the post season.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • mental1mental1 Posts: 60
    All that black soot reminds me of a device from my college days...sorry...TMI
  • I just put the tagine on the egg because I needed the oven in the house to put my rice pilaf in. I cook the rice at a much higher temp.
  • It was my first time. I have a lot to learn about the tagine.
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