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I don't get the Sous-vide thing

24

Comments

  • texaswigtexaswig Posts: 2,341

    Scott
    Greenville ,Tx

    Xl bge with woo2 and ajustable rack
  • Acn said:
    I don’t mean any offense, but it seems like lame stuff to post on a site about cooking with fire & smoke on a BGE.  I got a buddy that swears by it, but it seems like another way to boil.  Overrated French bs.  You want it tender??? Go low & slow.  
    One of the best things about this site is actually how people feel comfortable about talking about other cooking methods and tools.  That’s how many people learn about them in the first place.  Not to mention that many people combine a SV start with an Egg finish.  I don’t mean any offense, but try to have a more open mind.
    Plus, if it was only egged food, the front page would be entirely pulled pork and spatchcocked chicken, each with 6 views, and this place would be a ghost town.
    Actually I would respectfully disagree with this statement.  If I only cooked pulled pork and spatched chicken my egg would sit idle 90% of the time.  Many people here treat their egg like a stove and step way outside the so called “BBQ”.   

    To the OP - SV is a tool that works great when needed.  Just like your toolbox doesn’t only have one wrench.  It’s not the savior tool but works great and is fun learning different avenues of cooking.  

    -----------------------------------------


    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • SciAggieSciAggie Posts: 4,763
    Another example...
    Today is opening day of dove season. In years past I’ve had a lot of family in for opening weekend. We stay out until late, then have to get home and clean birds, put our gear away, shower and clean up - and then eat. 
    What if we want steaks? It’s just EASIER to have steaks in the SV hot tub all afternoon and then we can cook whenever we feel like it. Want another round of beer? Hey Gary, can we push back supper another 30 minutes? No worries... I’m ready when they are. 
    I really prefer to reverse sear a steak but in situations like this I’ll SV stuff just because it makes my life easier. YMMV
    Coleman, Texas
    Large BGE & Mini Max for the wok. A few old camp Dutch ovens and a wood fired oven. LSG 24” cabinet offset smoker. There are a few paella pans and a Patagonia cross in the barn. 
    "Bourbon slushies. Sure you can cook on the BGE without them, but why would you?"
                                                                                                                          YukonRon
    ”One can never go wrong with fried dough and grilled meat”
                                                                                  Smokingal
  • I keep reading about pasteurization. Doesn't food need to be at least 145 degrees to do that? How is it pasteurized? The temperature danger zone is food temperatures between 41 and 135 degrees the way I recall. Don't you feel leery about cooking lower than 135?

    It would seem this technique has a following so there must be something to it.  
  • What if I told you you can take a chuck roast and make it like prime rib.  













    I'd say that looks great.
  • texaswigtexaswig Posts: 2,341
    @tarheelmatt you mean it would literally pay for itself the first time you used it instead of buying a prime rib? That's amazing.please tell us more.
    Scott
    Greenville ,Tx

    Xl bge with woo2 and ajustable rack
  • Sorry for posting such lame bs on a site about cooking with smoke and fire on a bge
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • Sorry for posting such lame bs on a site about cooking with smoke and fire on a bge
    You should be ashamed! 

    -----------------------------------------


    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • As per @SciAggie’s example above, I found myself suddenly and unexpectedly hosting company last night. Had no idea what time they’d get there. Took a few filet mignons and rib eyes out of the freezer and threw them into a pot with the sous vide machine. Made a salad and prepped some potatoes as well as a carmelized onion and blue cheese sauce for the steak. Took a best guess as to when to start the potatoes and when the guests showed up, I seared the steaks and served. Incredible, no fuss dinner. 
  • texaswigtexaswig Posts: 2,341
    @The Cen-Tex Smoker you're a horrible person.
    Scott
    Greenville ,Tx

    Xl bge with woo2 and ajustable rack
  • Sorry for posting such lame bs on a site about cooking with smoke and fire on a bge
    You should be ashamed! 
    about so many things. Sadly, I rarely am :) 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • Sorry for posting such lame bs on a site about cooking with smoke and fire on a bge
    You should be ashamed! 
    about so many things. Sadly, I rarely am :) 
    And dare I bring up all your discussions about “Dishwashers”.  This is an egg dedicated forum. LMAO 

    -----------------------------------------


    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • I bought one, it was on sale but I really didn't think I would use it that often. Turns out I use it more than my Egg... I travel quite a bit and eat out often so when I'm home there is 0% chance of eating out. With this being said, my bride and I never can agree on a protein mainly because I would eat beef or pork ribs 7 nights a week, she eats this crazy dish called salad. 

    So tonight I'm throwing on 5 racks of ribs, eating 1/2 and freezing the rest, the remaining ribs will be gone in 2 weeks... A SV and good chamber sealer are your best friend....
    Chicago, IL BGE XL BGE Mini Webber Charcoal / Elmhurst, IL
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 6,784
    edited September 2019
    Sorry for posting such lame bs on a site about cooking with smoke and fire on a bge
    But you posted food pix so it's all good.
    The bozos that never post food pix are the lame bs'ers.
    Camped out in the (757/948/804)
  • johnnypjohnnyp Posts: 3,696
    I keep reading about pasteurization. Doesn't food need to be at least 145 degrees to do that? How is it pasteurized? The temperature danger zone is food temperatures between 41 and 135 degrees the way I recall. Don't you feel leery about cooking lower than 135?

    It would seem this technique has a following so there must be something to it.  
    Consider salmonella in chicken. At 165 degrees, almost all bacteria are killed almost immediately, while at 135 degrees it takes well over an hour for enough to die to achieve the 7 log10 standard. Similarly, 145 degrees takes less than 10 minutes, while 155 degrees less than 1 minute.

    Killing bacteria isn't simply a matter of temperature; it requires both temperature and time.


    You can find pasteurization table here if you wish.

    https://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html

    XL & MM BGE, 36" Blackstone - Newport News, VA
  • TheophanTheophan Posts: 2,644
    It's been demonstrated again and again that a careful reverse sear can do edge-to-edge pink as well as SV.  To me, the biggest issues are:
    • SV can be super convenient, which is the main reason it's so popular in restaurants.  Stick in in a bath and forget about it until someone wants one -- then sear it, serve it!  Can't beat that with a stick.
    • But for some of us, it's more about whether it's fun to mostly cook your food in a plastic bag in a water bath, or whether it's more fun to cook over fire and smoke.
    I've tried SV a few times, and it works, and it's convenient, but I just have more fun cooking over fire and smoke.  And I'm old and retired, so hanging out at home so I can check on the fire every now and again for a few hours doesn't interfere with my lifestyle, and is actually something I enjoy.  Even though I used to be a science nerd, somehow cooking in a plastic bag in a water bath with a high-tech temperature controller just isn't as much fun for me.

  • SciAggieSciAggie Posts: 4,763
    @Theophan The fun part of cooking is real and I feel the same as you. That said, it’s like cooking beans. I love cooking a pot of pinto beans long and slow and smelling them all day - my preferred method. But when I want them on a Wednesday night after work I pull out the instant pot. I get good beans quickly that are not from a can - or worse I don’t have to choose to do without. 
    Not singling you out btw, just adding to the discussion. 
    Coleman, Texas
    Large BGE & Mini Max for the wok. A few old camp Dutch ovens and a wood fired oven. LSG 24” cabinet offset smoker. There are a few paella pans and a Patagonia cross in the barn. 
    "Bourbon slushies. Sure you can cook on the BGE without them, but why would you?"
                                                                                                                          YukonRon
    ”One can never go wrong with fried dough and grilled meat”
                                                                                  Smokingal
  • johnnyp said:
    I keep reading about pasteurization. Doesn't food need to be at least 145 degrees to do that? How is it pasteurized? The temperature danger zone is food temperatures between 41 and 135 degrees the way I recall. Don't you feel leery about cooking lower than 135?

    It would seem this technique has a following so there must be something to it.  
    Consider salmonella in chicken. At 165 degrees, almost all bacteria are killed almost immediately, while at 135 degrees it takes well over an hour for enough to die to achieve the 7 log10 standard. Similarly, 145 degrees takes less than 10 minutes, while 155 degrees less than 1 minute.

    Killing bacteria isn't simply a matter of temperature; it requires both temperature and time.


    You can find pasteurization table here if you wish.

    https://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html

    Yeah but I see some cooking in the 120s. That seems too low no matter how long. 
  • I keep reading about pasteurization. Doesn't food need to be at least 145 degrees to do that? How is it pasteurized? The temperature danger zone is food temperatures between 41 and 135 degrees the way I recall. Don't you feel leery about cooking lower than 135?

    It would seem this technique has a following so there must be something to it.  
    As mentioned above, pasteurization can be done at much lower temps than the standard 140 for most foods and 165-185 for chicken. It just takes a little more time. That is actually the magic of Sv cooking. I cook chicken breast at 147 (but for 2 hours). It totally changes the texture from a dry chewy mouthful of muscle (do not google that) to a very tender, juicy cut of meat (I wouldn’t google that either just to be safe). 



    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • johnnyp said:
    I keep reading about pasteurization. Doesn't food need to be at least 145 degrees to do that? How is it pasteurized? The temperature danger zone is food temperatures between 41 and 135 degrees the way I recall. Don't you feel leery about cooking lower than 135?

    It would seem this technique has a following so there must be something to it.  
    Consider salmonella in chicken. At 165 degrees, almost all bacteria are killed almost immediately, while at 135 degrees it takes well over an hour for enough to die to achieve the 7 log10 standard. Similarly, 145 degrees takes less than 10 minutes, while 155 degrees less than 1 minute.

    Killing bacteria isn't simply a matter of temperature; it requires both temperature and time.


    You can find pasteurization table here if you wish.

    https://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html

    Yeah but I see some cooking in the 120s. That seems too low no matter how long. 
    You don’t see that temp on chicken.  More likely beef.  I run chicken at 147° for 2hrs, Pork at 131 for 2hrs and beef at 120 for 1hr and I’ve run tuna steaks at 115° for 40mins then seared 

    -----------------------------------------


    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • Try making chocolate pots over fire and smoke.
    "A generation of the unteachable is hanging upon us like a necklace of corpses." - George Orwell 

    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike

    Living large in the 919
  • johnnyp said:
    I keep reading about pasteurization. Doesn't food need to be at least 145 degrees to do that? How is it pasteurized? The temperature danger zone is food temperatures between 41 and 135 degrees the way I recall. Don't you feel leery about cooking lower than 135?

    It would seem this technique has a following so there must be something to it.  
    Consider salmonella in chicken. At 165 degrees, almost all bacteria are killed almost immediately, while at 135 degrees it takes well over an hour for enough to die to achieve the 7 log10 standard. Similarly, 145 degrees takes less than 10 minutes, while 155 degrees less than 1 minute.

    Killing bacteria isn't simply a matter of temperature; it requires both temperature and time.


    You can find pasteurization table here if you wish.

    https://www.douglasbaldwin.com/sous-vide.html

    Yeah but I see some cooking in the 120s. That seems too low no matter how long. 
    Nah- I cook fish at like 122. That’s fine but only for a short periods of time. You aren’t really looking to pasteurize everything. Anything under 130 would not be pasteurized and needs to be pulled in 3 hours or so. Needs to be eaten in 4 from when you put it in. 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • Tell you to piss off?
  • njlnjl Posts: 1,090
    I don’t mean any offense, but it seems like lame stuff to post on a site about cooking with fire & smoke on a BGE.  I got a buddy that swears by it, but it seems like another way to boil.  Overrated French bs.  You want it tender??? Go low & slow.  
    You can't go low&slower than sous vide.  One neat cook you can do is beef ribs (the ones cut off a rib roast).  Sous vide them at about 140F for about two days, then brown the top under the broiler.  You get super tender ribs that are only cooked to medium.

    The real advantage to it is that because you're cooking at the "internal done temperature", you can't overshoot.  You can cook things too long and mess with the texture, but you can't burn or dry out.
  • Tell you to piss off?
    Sick burn!  
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • texaswig said:
    @tarheelmatt you mean it would literally pay for itself the first time you used it instead of buying a prime rib? That's amazing.please tell us more.
    Pretty much buddy!  It's a great tool to have in the tool box.  


    ------------------------------
    Thomasville, NC
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  • I guess y’all are going to make me spend more money....
  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 9,942
    I also like it for vegetables.  Instead of boiling/steaming all the flavor and nutrients out of them, they cook in a little salt. pepper, butter in the SV and come out cooked perfect. You can do this even a few days ahead of time, pull them out and finish w a 5 minute saute on the stove. Carrots & green beans are my favorites to do this way. 
    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
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