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super smoke flavor on leftovers . . . ?

NDGNDG Posts: 1,552
edited July 2012 in EggHead Forum
To me Seems like smoke flavor gets MUCH more intense on leftovers, anyone else notice this phenomenom? It really sticks out on pizza/veggies and sometimes surprises me . .
Columbus, Ohio

Comments

  • BYS1981BYS1981 Posts: 2,530
    I have noticed this a few times.
  • A2ZA2Z Posts: 99
    edited July 2012

    I notice it also, especially on chicken.  I do not add any additional smoke to fish, poultry only what it gets from the lump as it burns.  Strictly a matter of personal taste.

    We like the fruitwoods (apple and cherry} for pork. seems mild.  

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,794
    I agree with the lighter food cooks and ABT's. No reasonable explanation here but the taste is great.
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • MDHogMDHog Posts: 43
    funny, we just had leftover new potatoes done hobo style on the egg last night. 

    No smoke flavor to speak off when we ate them the first time. 

    Very intense (too intense, really) as leftovers the next day.

    Don't have a good explanation but seems to be a consistent phenomenon.
  • MrCookingNurseMrCookingNurse Posts: 4,628
    I've had left over pizza that I almost can't eat. It's the only thing I've noticed it in. More so Digiorno or thicker crist


    _______________________________________________

    XLBGE 
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,950
    Anything w. fat soluble flavors will become more intense w. time. I don't know how it works, but the longer the flavor molecules mix or bond with the fat, the better they will be carried to the taste buds. The blending even continues when the food are in a freezer.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,712
    Here's a theory - if you're eating leftovers, your egg is probably not fired up and you're more sensitive to the smoke.  When your egg IS fired up and cooking, you're desensitized to the smoke because it's inundated the air.  So what I'm saying is it could be a sensitivity/perception issue.
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,674

    I agree with @nolaegghead on this one. You de-sensitive yourself to the smoke when you spend hours and hours around a pit cooking with smoke. Quite a few times I've been scratching my head in confusion while others around me are stuffing their faces in silence with a few mutters of "this is the best brisket/butt/ribs I've ever had" and to me they only tasted ok. The next day, it tasted totally different.

    Try this if you have time once your meat is done - take a shower, wash your hands, face and hair out, or stick your head under a garden hose for awhile before eating. I suggest a shower and a clean change of clothes. Makes a ton of difference in how the food tastes.

    Rowlett, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,712
    Reason I thought of that was because I cooked in a restaurant for years when I was in school and the odors (esp when cleaning fish, shrimp) were overpowering.  With time, your brain filters them out and you don't notice them.  Buddy of mine was representing a shrimp processing plant and (he was warned) almost passed out walking through the production line.  Guy at the plant said he doesn't even notice the smell anymore.

    Thanks griffin
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,674
    I'm a chemist and work at a watewater treatment plant. Don't hardly even smell it anymore. On days when I can, it must be bad. You get used to what you have to smell on a daily basis.

    Rowlett, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,712
    I'm in the same boat - work at an environmental lab.  I don't really notice the chemical smells anymore except the rare occasion when some numbskull opens a jar of funky crap from one of the chemical plants without being under the hood.   Degree is in chemistry but I'm a software engineer now for our LIMS.
    I'm a chemist and work at a watewater treatment plant. Don't hardly even smell it anymore. On days when I can, it must be bad. You get used to what you have to smell on a daily basis.

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,674
    We've discussed this before. Mmmm....love the smell of hydrochloric acid in the morning....not really.

    Rowlett, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,712
    Hydrochloric acid in the morning and hickory smoke in the evening.  What a life....
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • NDGNDG Posts: 1,552
    Ok I gotcha. My theory was that flavors just got more intense over time under refrigeration - same reason why they say "day old soup" is better then fresh and why Italians swear tomato sauce better after night resting in fridge. I will try the grill, shower, then eat test and report back.

    If I am simply conditioned to not observe the smoke due to exposure during grill, it kind of worries me about my guests experience . . . Sometime the day after food is too smokey for me!
    Columbus, Ohio
  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,528
    Not just an issue with the Egg. My Grandmother always said 'food always tastes better when someone else cooks it' and I think it has to do with being overwhelmed/desensitized to the smells while cooking, it will 'taste' different the next day.
    __________________________________________
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    - Camp Hill, PA
  • jfarleyjfarley Posts: 145
    I just experienced this myself with a salad I made from veggies and chicken breasts cooked yesterday. Right off the egg yesterday they did not seem to have a lot of smoke flavor. Tonight's salad had the smoke taste. It was actually a pleasant surprise because the smoke flavor was just right.

    I'm still pretty new to the BGE. Yesterday I had trouble trying to get the egg back to 350 degrees to cook the boneless chicken breasts after the veggies. Pretty sure it was because I left the lid open too long while dealing with getting the veggies off. This let the fire take off. Note to self: do what you need to with the lid open and get it closed again as soon as possible.
    LBGE - July 2012
    Valencia, CA
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,712
    The mothership actually says something to the effect, never cook with the top open.  You gotta open it to tend to the food.  I think the reason they say that is, if you're grilling, the fire is like a reactor going critical when the top is up.  Don't take long before you've got charcoal briquettes on your cooking grate.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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