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Carnitas/Carne Seca

ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
edited 6:30PM in EggHead Forum
Anyone have a favorite recipe for either one that they would like to share? It would be preferrable that it could be cooked on the egg. I was thinking for the carnitas I would use some spicy rub on a butt and cook like I was doing PP. I am not even sure that carne seca is the correct term for what I am looking for. I want the beef version of carnitas. Something to make pork/beef tacos/burros/enchiladas with. Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,244
    Try this.

    Pork, Butt, Carnitas, Beli

    For aficionados of pork, carnitas(Little Pieces of Browned Pork) are an all-time favorite in Mexico. For some reason the carnitas in the state of Michioacan have always been considered the best...couldn't be any easier!!!! Here is the recipe!!!!!


    INGREDIENTS:
    3 lbs Pork Shoulder, Skin & Bone Removed
    2 tsp Salt, or to taste




    Procedure Procedure:
    1 Cut the meat, with the fat, into strips about 2 by 3/4 inches. Barely cover the meat with water in a heavy wide pan. Add the salt and bring to a boil, uncovered. Lower the heath and let the meat continue cooking briskly untill all the liquid has evaporated- by this time it should be cooked through but not falling apart.
    2 Lower the heath a little and continue cooking the meat until all the fat has rendered out of it. Keep turning the meat until is lightly browned all over- total cooking time is about 1 hour 10 minutes.
    3 Serve immediately for best flavor & texture.
    4 Carnitas can be eaten as a main course or as a hearty botana accompanied by guacamole or preferably a fresh green sauce or Salsa Mexicana Cruda


    Recipe Type
    Main Dish, Meat

    Recipe Source
    Source: BGE Forum, Beli, 2009/01/06

    *********************************************************

    Pork, Butt, Carnitas, Latin, Thirdeye

    PP works wonderfully for burritos and enchiladas too. I even use it as a base for my tamale filling.Generally the cooking method for Carnitas is either braising or baking until the pork is able to be shreaded. Usually the seasonings are salt and pepper and sometimes garlic and onion are added. Following shreading, the pork is baked until the edges are just crispy. The meat is served with side bowls of salsa, maybe a chili sauce, onion & cilantro so that you add whatever you like to the burrito. The roadside stands or Taco Trucks sell it by the pound and you buy fresh tortillas and build your own.So if you like you can return a tray of PP to the Egg or the oven for a litle while, and there is nothing wrong if you want to add some of your favorite Mexican spices to it at this time. I like using both flour and corn tortillas and if you have access to fresh masa (or want to deal with Masa Harina) you can make gorditas, as they are excellent too. They are thicker than corn tortillas and are fried on a griddle until lightly browned. I make them about 3" in diameter and use Mexican melting cheese on top of the carnitas & toppings.~thirdeye~


    INGREDIENTS:



    Recipe Type
    Main Dish, Meat

    Recipe Source
    Author: Thirdeye

    Source: BGE Forum, Thirdeye, 2006/03/26


    *************************

    Beef, Roast, Texas BBQ Al Pastor


    INGREDIENTS:



    ROAST BEEF AL PASTOR
    1 John Casey has spent a lot of time in South Texas and has watched the Mexican cowboys cook over an open fire. Here is the way he says to make a perfect al pastor roast beef. First of all go to the best butcher you know and buy a good quality roast beef, a rump roast, that weighs between 6 and 8 pounds.
    2 Next, you go to the hardware store. Get a steel rod 4-5 feet long and 1/2 inch in diameter. Have one end of the rod sharpened so you can drive it into the ground. Drill 4 holes 6 inches apart at 2 feet, 2 1/2 feet, 3 feet, and so on. Each hole must accommodate a good-sized cotter pin, which is inserted through the hole at right angles to the rod. Thread a big flat washer onto the rod and let it rest on the cotter pin. These pins and washers keep the meat from sliding down the rod. The various holes allow you to adjust the distance between the meat and heat source, as necessary. Salt and pepper the roast, then impale the meat on the rod. Fix the washers below and above the meat, drive the rod into the ground at a 60 degree angle, and you have an alfresco spit.
    3 Now here is the way Casey says to build the perfect outdoor fire. Get the kids to find 2 logs that are well seasoned but not rotten. They should be about 3 feet long and at least 4 to 6 inches in diameter. Butt these logs into a right angle. Build a hardwood fire-oak, hickory, or pecan-in the crotch or the joint of the logs. Keep the meat on the rod which is hanging out over this fire about 3 feet above the heat. Turn the meat from time to time, Casey says the fire will smolder in the logs and that if you have everything positioned just so, you can go away at dawn and by 2 o'clock in the afternoon have a good dinner waiting.


    Servings: 1

    Recipe Type
    Main Dish, Meat

    Recipe Source
    Author: From: The Only Texas Cookbook, Texas Monthly Press, 1981 By: Linda West Eckhardt

    Source: BBQ List, Only Texas Cookbook
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    Thanks richard. It's funny you posted those recipes, I was just looking at them. I was trying to figure out how to convert the recipes for cooking on the egg.
  • HossHoss Posts: 14,600
    Interesting.I have been told,the first time you visit a mexican restraunt in the U.S. to try the carnitas,that will tell you if it is a good one or just a place that sells chips and fajitas. :huh:
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    I haven't heard that one before but it sounds reasonable. I am used to mexican food in SoCal and I am trying to duplicate it here in Maryland, since we don't have any authentic mexican restaurants in SoMD. I would have to go to Montgomerey County(N. of D.C.) or into VA for that.
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    You know, I didn't realize that carnitas were so simple. I thought they would be a little more complex, but I guess what I was tasting was the sauce mixed in after the carnitas were cooked.
  • jeffinsgfjeffinsgf Posts: 1,259
    I've used this recipe from Emeril Lagasse a couple times, with good results. It boils the cubes in lard for a couple hours. Tastes great, but it is painstaking to do and creates a godawful mess in your D.O. I'll try Beli's the next time to compare.

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/emeril-lagasse/carnitas-soft-tacos-with-guacamole-and-pico-de-gallo-recipe/index.html
  • jeffinsgfjeffinsgf Posts: 1,259
    Anita's in Chantilly by Dulles. Not fancy, but outstanding New Mexican cooking. You really need to have breakfast there someday.
  • DrugCoderDrugCoder Posts: 219
    Here's my favorite Carnitas recipe. Check out the link to the green sauce too.

    http://homesicktexan.blogspot.com/2008/07/carnitas-houston-style.html
  • DavekatzDavekatz Posts: 763
    My favorite carnitas recipe is however I cooked them last time ;).

    carnitas_P1020372071310.jpg

    Carnitas with Pickled Onions

    Simple Carnitas

    Mas Carnitas

    Carnitas
    Food & Fire - The carnivorous ramblings of a gluten-free grill geek.
  • jeffinsgfjeffinsgf Posts: 1,259
    Nice blog, Dave.

    Can I e-mail you some questions about it?
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    That's probably about a good 1.5 hour drive for me. I'll try it if I am ever out that way, thanks.
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    Thanks for the link. That recipe is very similar to the one Beli provided a while back. I'll have to try both. Do you like the green sauce recipe? I have been looking for a good one.
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    Thanks, are you planning to try Beli's soon? If so, let me know how it turns out. I would like to try the emeril lagasse recipe as well but so far it looks like I have three others to try before this one.
  • DavekatzDavekatz Posts: 763
    Sure - use the email link under the Gelina & Dave section on the right.
    Food & Fire - The carnivorous ramblings of a gluten-free grill geek.
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    Very nice. I like how you eggerized it(I think I heard GW use that term before ;)) I will definitely have to check your site out. Thanks again.
  • ResQueResQue Posts: 1,045
    Thanks for all the replies for carnitas! I definitely have enough recipes now to try different versions. Now does anyone have a favorite or authentic spicy braised beef recipe?
  • DrugCoderDrugCoder Posts: 219
    Jagermeister wrote:
    Thanks for the link. That recipe is very similar to the one Beli provided a while back. I'll have to try both. Do you like the green sauce recipe? I have been looking for a good one.

    I love the green sauce recipe! We NEVER have the carnitas without the green sauce. And when they're not in season we have had success replacing the green tomatoes with a basic salsa verde
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