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Steak mistake

I am sure I know the answer but here it goes anyway.  I pulled out some vac packed frozen steak last night to sous vide overnight.  2 to a pack.  I forgot to hit start on the sous vide and it has sat in 73 deg water for about 12 hours.   Unsalvageable?
Large BGE
BBQ Guru DigiQ II

Martensville, Saskatchewan Canada

Comments

  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 8,690
    I'd say so.

    In reality, if vac packed and frozen there 'should' be no bacteria in the bag, so the odds of you getting sick if you eat it are low.  But I wouldn't take that chance.  

    Others may think differently.

    XXL BGE, Karebecue, Klose BYC, Chargiller Akorn Kamado, Weber Smokey Mountain, Grand Turbo gasser, Weber Smoky Joe, and the wheelbarrow that my grandfather used to cook steaks from his cattle

    San Antonio, TX

  • bigalsworthbigalsworth Posts: 685
    I feel the same.  In the garbage they go.
    Large BGE
    BBQ Guru DigiQ II

    Martensville, Saskatchewan Canada
  • That’s a good call. They are likely fine but 12 hrs is too long for me. 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 8,520
    At that temp you are pretty much in ideal Petrie dish territory, unless they are wagyu I’d Toss ‘em. If they are wagyu the dogs would be very happy as I’d overcook in the Trés Booblay. 
    Delta B.C. - Whiskey and steak, because no good story ever started with someone having a salad!
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,758
    Foghorn said:
    I'd say so.

    In reality, if vac packed and frozen there 'should' be no bacteria in the bag, so the odds of you getting sick if you eat it are low.  But I wouldn't take that chance.  

    Others may think differently.
    Freezing doesn’t kill any of the pathogens. They stop being active but will get going again when thawed out.  Any nasties on the steaks when put in the bag are still there and ready to go.  
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • BotchBotch Posts: 11,362
    At that temp you are pretty much in ideal Petrie dish territory, unless they are wagyu I’d Toss ‘em. If they are wagyu the dogs would be very happy as I’d overcook in the Trés Booblay. 
    Before this virus thing became a thing, my local grocer started carrying SNF, and I bought a ribeye at $27.  Once home, I saw the expiration date was two days away, so I made plans to cook it the next day. 
    Next day, taking it out, it didn't smell very good.  But at $27, I decided to cook it to med-rare instead of rare.  Texture was sublime, taste not quite so much.  I felt kinda sick for the next 24 hours (never threw up) but decided never to do that again.  Oof-dah.  
    ____________________________________________
    "Had I known I would've lived this long, I would've taken better care of myself."  
       -**** Van Dyke, 24 May 2021  
            
  • jdMyersjdMyers Posts: 604
    talk about a slow cooooooook
    Columbus, Ohio
  • After being in this kind of situation myself many times now, I’ve decided that from the moment I have to seriously question the safety of the product, regardless of whether or not it has actually spoiled, I will no longer enjoy it. 

    When in doubt, just throw it out. 
  • cssmd27cssmd27 Posts: 328
    What temp were you going to SV overnight?  Usually for steaks, it's a pretty low temp that still allows bacterial survival and growth and hence most people don't do a long SV on steaks.  It also makes the texture mealy and too tender IMO, but that's just a taste preference.

    When I SV steaks, I never do it above 120 and I certainly wouldn't do that for an extended period - maybe 1.5 hours.

    As to your specific situation, I don't know the sourcing of the meat, but I would take it out, wash it with cold water well, dry and salt it and do a reverse sear via the oven at 250 or so until about 115, then sear it.  Washing gets the bad stuff off and the 250 will kill any bacteria left.  And, the steak started frozen, so it took a while to get up to 73 overnight.  That's not that warm and plenty of meat markets around the world have beef out exposed without refrigeration for much of the day in worse conditions.

    But, if the bag is puffy (gas generated by bacteria), I would toss it.  Or, if you pull it out and after a rinse it had a really bad smell.

    Overall, clean it up (wash) and evaluate it.  Very likely it is just fine.
    Dallas (University Park), Texas
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