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A little extra smoke to the meat / custom flow plates

SlippySlippy Posts: 9
edited August 10 in EggHead Forum
I smoke a lot of meat on my offset smoker, and I would love to move some of those smokes to the egg, but I can seem to get it smokey enough (I'm in Texas!). I suspect it is because the smoke goes around the platesetter and follows the lid up to the chimney, without really contacting the meat very much.... So I searched around for clever ways to redirect the smoke to flow across the meat on BGE, but did not have much luck. Perhaps simply raising the meat on a elevated grate would do the trick. But I started thinking about how the offset works, and thought maybe I could get all of the smoke over to one side, the redirect it across the meat, then up on out, perhaps that would be better? The bottom plate take the place of the platesetter. My friend has a steel shop with a CNC plasma, so I may have him cut this option out and give it a go.... By looking at this drawing, is there something inherently wrong here that I am not thinking of? I have not decided how to elevate the grill and top plate yet. Probably just firebrick to start out to make sure it works. I appreciate any insight from the Pros... 
Rockwall, TX Large BGE, Really old Oklahoma Joe offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... Future: Lone Star Grillz offset smoker. 
«1

Comments

  • GrillSgtGrillSgt Posts: 1,969
    edited August 10
    What about a platesetter that goes from edge to edge but has a lot of rather small holes?


    Woodford & Barren Co. KY

    LBGE, XLBGE, 2 Weber Genesis, Weber 22" kettle

    I’d kill for a Nobel Peace Prize

  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 3,434
    edited August 10
    I don't think you will ever get the same result with a Kamado type as it is more of a smoldering fire vs a Stick Burner- I'm sure someone will chime in with the science behind that 
    Visalia, Ca
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 17,403
    Welcome aboard and enjoy the journey.  Above all, have fun.
    I get what you are looking to achieve although I'm not sure the current smoke path is the reason for the lower level of smoke on the BGE protein.   Your proposed set-up may have an impact on cooking chamber temperature control but about the only way to know is to give it a shot.  FWIW-
    I'm sure others will be along. 
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • billt01billt01 Posts: 794
    Is there a difference in the fuel you are using in your offset and your egg? 

    try closing your daisy wheel more and adjusting to the slide vent at the bottom to control temp.

    Once I had my offset hot and rolling, there was minimal smoke exiting the cooker. I'd get a little at first when adding logs, but that died almost completely once the logs turned to coals.


     "Don't listen to her, Bob.Remember: those who can, do; those who can't, teach."
                                                                                                     -Jane
                                                                                                     "Man and Superman"
    Have:
    LBGE / Stumps Baby XL / Couple of Stokers (Gen 1 and Gen 3), Blackstone 36

    Had:
    Lang 60D, Cookshack SM150, Stumps Stretch, Stumps Baby

    Fat Willies BBQ
    Ola, Ga

  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 6,236
    speaking of science (someone posted it a while back)...
    https://www.wired.com/2015/07/high-tech-bbq/
    canuckland
  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 17,904
    edited August 10
    BGE's are kind of wonky smokers but you can make great bbq on them once you get the hang of it. I think you have several things to think about before building flow plates. You can get plenty of smoke cooking on a bge. I do get the occasional "pot roast" brisket with little smoke which is frustrating but for the most part, the egg is a smoke machine if you have the wood in the right place and the fire at the right temp. In most cases it's too smoky for me because you are working with smoldering wood instead of clean-burning wood like in a stick burner. Smoldering wood has a much stronger flavor than a clean burning wood fire. 

    Here is what I would think about first:

    1) At what temp are you cooking? If you cook at 200-225 on a bge, the fire is so tiny (especially in the summer) that if your wood is not on the exact spot of the glowing lump, it won't burn. I like cooking a little hotter in a bge so there is a little more lump going to keep it hot. I find 260-275 is about the right spot. 

    2) How much wood are you using and chips or chunks? I go back and forth on chips and chunks but I think chips mixed in is likely the best opportunity for contact with lit lump throughout the cook. That said, if I use chunks (which is most of the time because I cut them myself from my stick burner oak pile) I push the biggest one right down in the to glowing lump in the center of my egg. It seems to smolder for all, if not most of the cook. 

    I found if I build a little smaller fire and make it work harder to warm the egg, I've had better results with smoke. You could also use a water pan as a heat sink to make the fire work harder as well. 

    Keep at it- you'll find plenty of smoke once you get the hang of it. 


    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 17,904
    edited August 10
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • KayakKayak Posts: 165

    If you have a CGS setup, what about a couple of those ceramic half plates on opposite sides at different levels first? They aren't tight around the edges, but might get more turbulence going than not. Just a thought.

    Bob

    New Cumberland, PA
    XL with the usual accessories

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,668
    Why don't you try two metal plates separated by about half and inch or so with offset cut-outs so there is no direct heat, but distributed smoke (effluent) from the fire below.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,668
    Actually could design that so the two plates rotate relative to one another and you could dial in a little direct heat also.  I should patent this.  MANShield(tm)
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Actually could design that so the two plates rotate relative to one another and you could dial in a little direct heat also.  I should patent this.  MANShield(tm)
    The name is perfect. Justin would love it. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 9
    Actually could design that so the two plates rotate relative to one another and you could dial in a little direct heat also.  I should patent this.  MANShield(tm)
    Hmmmm. That is interesting... That was the idea, to keep the direct heat at bay...  That may be worth a test... 

    Rockwall, TX Large BGE, Really old Oklahoma Joe offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... Future: Lone Star Grillz offset smoker. 
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 9
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    Rockwall, TX Large BGE, Really old Oklahoma Joe offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... Future: Lone Star Grillz offset smoker. 
  • Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    I'm doing a brisket on my egg tonight for a class we are teaching tomorrow. I'll send you a pic of my setup and you can play around with it from there. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 9
    Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    Thanks. That's good info. I doubt I will ever do a brisket on the egg, just because I know it can't be better than my the works of art I get on the offset.... But I would like to start experimenting with the shorter cooks (ribs, butts, turkey, chicken, lobster, poppers, etc...)
    Rockwall, TX Large BGE, Really old Oklahoma Joe offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... Future: Lone Star Grillz offset smoker. 
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 9
    Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    I'm doing a brisket on my egg tonight for a class we are teaching tomorrow. I'll send you a pic of my setup and you can play around with it from there. 
    Where is your class? Central Texas I assume? 
    Rockwall, TX Large BGE, Really old Oklahoma Joe offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... Future: Lone Star Grillz offset smoker. 
  • Slippy said:
    Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    I'm doing a brisket on my egg tonight for a class we are teaching tomorrow. I'll send you a pic of my setup and you can play around with it from there. 
    Where is your class? Central Texas I assume? 
    In Austin at Faradays Kitchen Store. He's a BGE dealer as well but we teach all kinds of stuff there. He's got a great cooking school.
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • Slippy said:
    Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    Thanks. That's good info. I doubt I will ever do a brisket on the egg, just because I know it can't be better than my the works of art I get on the offset.... But I would like to start experimenting with the shorter cooks (ribs, butts, turkey, chicken, lobster, poppers, etc...)
    Honestly those are the most glaring to me. Brisket and butts can handle a ton of smoke but more delicate stuff like ribs, chicken, turkey tend to soak it up. I do a ton of poultry on my egg but only hot and fast. I still do Briskets in the BGE for the class (11am start and I like to sleep) but everything else goes in to the dishwasher (my karubecue smoker). The good news is that if you add some chunks to a hot and fast cook on a bge, you'll get the same clean smoke profile you get from your stick burner with low and slow. As long as the wood is fully burning, you'll get great wood flavor. It's when it's all choked down that you have to worry about the bitter stuff. You probably don't need to add any wood at all for lobster, chicken, or turkey espeically if you are using one of the smokier lumps. 

    You should absolutely try a brisket on your BGE- I've done some kickass briskets on mine. It's just not as consistent as I can get with sticks but I'm tweaky about it. I guarantee you that with a little practice you can cook almost everybody's "best ever" brisket every time on a BGE. Most people are not like us :)
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,668
    @The Cen-Tex Smoker  Typically, what kind of burn time do you get with the KBQ before having to reload?
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • @The Cen-Tex Smoker  Typically, what kind of burn time do you get with the KBQ before having to reload?
    You can get 30-45 min of burn time when fully loaded but it's not realistic to think it will run that long unattended. You kind of have to poke and prod at the fire every 20-30 min to make sure all the sticks are falling as the one on bottom burns away. If you are using very uniform sticks, you could probably get away with 30-45 min. at 250 degrees
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 9
    Slippy said:
    Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    Thanks. That's good info. I doubt I will ever do a brisket on the egg, just because I know it can't be better than my the works of art I get on the offset.... But I would like to start experimenting with the shorter cooks (ribs, butts, turkey, chicken, lobster, poppers, etc...)
    Honestly those are the most glaring to me. Brisket and butts can handle a ton of smoke but more delicate stuff like ribs, chicken, turkey tend to soak it up. I do a ton of poultry on my egg but only hot and fast. I still do Briskets in the BGE for the class (11am start and I like to sleep) but everything else goes in to the dishwasher (my karubecue smoker). The good news is that if you add some chunks to a hot and fast cook on a bge, you'll get the same clean smoke profile you get from your stick burner with low and slow. As long as the wood is fully burning, you'll get great wood flavor. It's when it's all choked down that you have to worry about the bitter stuff. You probably don't need to add any wood at all for lobster, chicken, or turkey espeically if you are using one of the smokier lumps. 

    You should absolutely try a brisket on your BGE- I've done some kickass briskets on mine. It's just not as consistent as I can get with sticks but I'm tweaky about it. I guarantee you that with a little practice you can cook almost everybody's "best ever" brisket every time on a BGE. Most people are not like us :)
    Alright, alright, you talked me into it. I'll give it a go... I would love to see the pics of your set up first... I try to use seasoned, but not dead, wood. I may have to make my own chunks, or find a source that doesn't kiln dry them to death... 
    Rockwall, TX Large BGE, Really old Oklahoma Joe offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... Future: Lone Star Grillz offset smoker. 
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 5,149
    @The Cen-Tex Smoker  Typically, what kind of burn time do you get with the KBQ before having to reload?
    You can get 30-45 min of burn time when fully loaded but it's not realistic to think it will run that long unattended. You kind of have to poke and prod at the fire every 20-30 min to make sure all the sticks are falling as the one on bottom burns away. If you are using very uniform sticks, you could probably get away with 30-45 min. at 250 degrees
    I've never been able to go more than 30 minutes before having to poke the coal bed and drop a couple more sticks in "the hopper". Especially on cold winter days.

    I never use the lid on my firebox either so maybe that would help get a little more run time before having to reload. Do you use your lid all the time?

    Camped out in the (757/804)
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 9

    BGE's are kind of wonky smokers but you can make great bbq on them once you get the hang of it. I think you have several things to think about before building flow plates. You can get plenty of smoke cooking on a bge. I do get the occasional "pot roast" brisket with little smoke which is frustrating but for the most part, the egg is a smoke machine if you have the wood in the right place and the fire at the right temp. In most cases it's too smoky for me because you are working with smoldering wood instead of clean-burning wood like in a stick burner. Smoldering wood has a much stronger flavor than a clean burning wood fire. 

    Here is what I would think about first:

    1) At what temp are you cooking? If you cook at 200-225 on a bge, the fire is so tiny (especially in the summer) that if your wood is not on the exact spot of the glowing lump, it won't burn. I like cooking a little hotter in a bge so there is a little more lump going to keep it hot. I find 260-275 is about the right spot. 

    2) How much wood are you using and chips or chunks? I go back and forth on chips and chunks but I think chips mixed in is likely the best opportunity for contact with lit lump throughout the cook. That said, if I use chunks (which is most of the time because I cut them myself from my stick burner oak pile) I push the biggest one right down in the to glowing lump in the center of my egg. It seems to smolder for all, if not most of the cook. 

    I found if I build a little smaller fire and make it work harder to warm the egg, I've had better results with smoke. You could also use a water pan as a heat sink to make the fire work harder as well. 

    Keep at it- you'll find plenty of smoke once you get the hang of it. 


    BGE's are kind of wonky smokers but you can make great bbq on them once you get the hang of it. I think you have several things to think about before building flow plates. You can get plenty of smoke cooking on a bge. I do get the occasional "pot roast" brisket with little smoke which is frustrating but for the most part, the egg is a smoke machine if you have the wood in the right place and the fire at the right temp. In most cases it's too smoky for me because you are working with smoldering wood instead of clean-burning wood like in a stick burner. Smoldering wood has a much stronger flavor than a clean burning wood fire. 

    Here is what I would think about first:

    1) At what temp are you cooking? If you cook at 200-225 on a bge, the fire is so tiny (especially in the summer) that if your wood is not on the exact spot of the glowing lump, it won't burn. I like cooking a little hotter in a bge so there is a little more lump going to keep it hot. I find 260-275 is about the right spot. 

    2) How much wood are you using and chips or chunks? I go back and forth on chips and chunks but I think chips mixed in is likely the best opportunity for contact with lit lump throughout the cook. That said, if I use chunks (which is most of the time because I cut them myself from my stick burner oak pile) I push the biggest one right down in the to glowing lump in the center of my egg. It seems to smolder for all, if not most of the cook. 

    I found if I build a little smaller fire and make it work harder to warm the egg, I've had better results with smoke. You could also use a water pan as a heat sink to make the fire work harder as well. 

    Keep at it- you'll find plenty of smoke once you get the hang of it. 


    When I smoke brisket on the offset, I like to keep the temp in the 230-250 range. I have not had good luck keeping the egg that low. So I am happy to smoke in the 275 range, if that is the sweet spot for a BGE, plus I can reduce the amount of time by a few hours... Appreciate all of your insight!! 
    Rockwall, TX Large BGE, Really old Oklahoma Joe offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... Future: Lone Star Grillz offset smoker. 
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 3,434
    Slippy said:
    Slippy said:
    Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    Thanks. That's good info. I doubt I will ever do a brisket on the egg, just because I know it can't be better than my the works of art I get on the offset.... But I would like to start experimenting with the shorter cooks (ribs, butts, turkey, chicken, lobster, poppers, etc...)
    Honestly those are the most glaring to me. Brisket and butts can handle a ton of smoke but more delicate stuff like ribs, chicken, turkey tend to soak it up. I do a ton of poultry on my egg but only hot and fast. I still do Briskets in the BGE for the class (11am start and I like to sleep) but everything else goes in to the dishwasher (my karubecue smoker). The good news is that if you add some chunks to a hot and fast cook on a bge, you'll get the same clean smoke profile you get from your stick burner with low and slow. As long as the wood is fully burning, you'll get great wood flavor. It's when it's all choked down that you have to worry about the bitter stuff. You probably don't need to add any wood at all for lobster, chicken, or turkey espeically if you are using one of the smokier lumps. 

    You should absolutely try a brisket on your BGE- I've done some kickass briskets on mine. It's just not as consistent as I can get with sticks but I'm tweaky about it. I guarantee you that with a little practice you can cook almost everybody's "best ever" brisket every time on a BGE. Most people are not like us :)
    Alright, alright, you talked me into it. I'll give it a go... I would love to see the pics of your set up first... I try to use seasoned, but not dead, wood. I may have to make my own chunks, or find a source that doesn't kiln dry them to death... 
    That's what I use for smoke wood in my egg, same wood I use in my stick Burner , just the small pieces from the wood pile 
    Visalia, Ca
  • HeavyG said:
    @The Cen-Tex Smoker  Typically, what kind of burn time do you get with the KBQ before having to reload?
    You can get 30-45 min of burn time when fully loaded but it's not realistic to think it will run that long unattended. You kind of have to poke and prod at the fire every 20-30 min to make sure all the sticks are falling as the one on bottom burns away. If you are using very uniform sticks, you could probably get away with 30-45 min. at 250 degrees
    I've never been able to go more than 30 minutes before having to poke the coal bed and drop a couple more sticks in "the hopper". Especially on cold winter days.

    I never use the lid on my firebox either so maybe that would help get a little more run time before having to reload. Do you use your lid all the time?

    never use it- I stack one stick above the fire box most of the time. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • Slippy said:
    Slippy said:
    Slippy said:
    and btw- unlike a stick burner, there is no such thing as "clear blue smoke" coming off a kamado cooker (unless you are using lump only). If you can't see smoke, your wood is not burning. You should see whispy white smoke coming out the top when wood is in contact with burning lump on a low and slow in a kamodo cooker. 
    I wonder if the lump coal is actually providing smoke flavor, since it is wood? I am accustomed to smoking with clear smoke, so the white stuff scares me a bit. Even adding a stick to a well established fire worries me. I guess I need to learn a bit more about the lump charcoal process to understand how it differs from a smoldering stick...  
    It doesn't differ from a smoldering stick, it's just smaller (chunk or chip). The egg produces dirty smoke by design on low and slow cooks. It just produces a very small amount of it so to most people it's not off-putting. To me it is but it took me 15 years to get there. 

    some lump is smokier than others but most of it goes clear at some point as it's all carbon once the impurities burn off. You will not be happy trying to cook with lump only on a low and slow. you need some wood in there but finding the balance is what takes a little trial and error.
    Thanks. That's good info. I doubt I will ever do a brisket on the egg, just because I know it can't be better than my the works of art I get on the offset.... But I would like to start experimenting with the shorter cooks (ribs, butts, turkey, chicken, lobster, poppers, etc...)
    Honestly those are the most glaring to me. Brisket and butts can handle a ton of smoke but more delicate stuff like ribs, chicken, turkey tend to soak it up. I do a ton of poultry on my egg but only hot and fast. I still do Briskets in the BGE for the class (11am start and I like to sleep) but everything else goes in to the dishwasher (my karubecue smoker). The good news is that if you add some chunks to a hot and fast cook on a bge, you'll get the same clean smoke profile you get from your stick burner with low and slow. As long as the wood is fully burning, you'll get great wood flavor. It's when it's all choked down that you have to worry about the bitter stuff. You probably don't need to add any wood at all for lobster, chicken, or turkey espeically if you are using one of the smokier lumps. 

    You should absolutely try a brisket on your BGE- I've done some kickass briskets on mine. It's just not as consistent as I can get with sticks but I'm tweaky about it. I guarantee you that with a little practice you can cook almost everybody's "best ever" brisket every time on a BGE. Most people are not like us :)
    Alright, alright, you talked me into it. I'll give it a go... I would love to see the pics of your set up first... I try to use seasoned, but not dead, wood. I may have to make my own chunks, or find a source that doesn't kiln dry them to death... 
    Makes a big difference
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • mEGG_My_DaymEGG_My_Day Posts: 649
    Why don't you try two metal plates separated by about half and inch or so with offset cut-outs so there is no direct heat, but distributed smoke (effluent) from the fire below.
    This is an interesting design. It reminds me of the Kick Ash basket in that it solves a problem I didn't know I had. =) =)  Seriously, I bet you could sell these.  If it was cast iron, it would be way heavy, so you may want to add handles on either side to pick it up and to slide a grid on top ala the CSG woo. 
    Memphis, TN 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,668
    Why don't you try two metal plates separated by about half and inch or so with offset cut-outs so there is no direct heat, but distributed smoke (effluent) from the fire below.
    This is an interesting design. It reminds me of the Kick Ash basket in that it solves a problem I didn't know I had. =) =)  Seriously, I bet you could sell these.  If it was cast iron, it would be way heavy, so you may want to add handles on either side to pick it up and to slide a grid on top ala the CSG woo. 
    Come to think of it, this heat shield could be the same diameter as the fire ring - it could sit right on top.  No need to have gaps on the sides, the heat could travel up, evenly under the food.

    hmmm....I might build a prototype.  1/4" steel plate shouldn't be too heavy.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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