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FIrst Brisket

One recipe calls roasting it in oven first.  This sounds good since I would think it would turn out jucier.  Of course I want to do the whole thing on the egg.  So some questions-

1.  Do any of you roast yours in the oven before putting it on the egg?
2.  How do you keep it moist on the egg?  I have used apple juice under my meat before but I feel like that is not as effective as actually roasting it in the marinade.

Any other advice for a brisket first timer?


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Comments

  • 1voyager1voyager Posts: 306
    edited September 2017
    1. No. Never, ever, ever.   :o

    2. No need for apple juice. It will be moist.

    Good luck and most of all, have fun.
    Somewhere in Colorado
    LBGE, PGS A40 Gasser
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    1) I don't know anyone here who routinely uses the oven. 

    2) To maximize moisture, some wrap in butcher paper (I do) or aluminum foil - after they are happy with the bark (usually at a meat temp of about 170).

    There are a lot of brisket threads here with volumes of advice.  It would be hard to summarize all of them in one post as they are often contradictory (wrap vs don't... fat cap up vs down..., etc).

    Take a few minutes and peruse them. Plot your path and enjoy the ride. It will take you a few to get into the "home run" territory, but with the good folks here you might be able to get there sooner than you would without the support of the forum. 

    Good luck!

    P.S.  People here like pictures. You'll get more help if you post specifics and pictures - "Here is my 13 pound whole packer brisket that I trimmed to 12 pounds and rubbed with... .  I'm planning on cooking at 250..., etc"

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    The butcher recommended going small first time.  I only have a 5 lb brisket point.  I am planning on doing a rub with an injection.  My initial plan was to go 250 and then drop to 200-225 until done.
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    It's rare to find just a point. 

    With all that fat, moisture shouldn't be an issue. 

    I'm not aware of any reason to change temps during the cook. If you get off to a good start - at any temp between 225 and 275 - just go with it. 

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    He cut one that he had in half for me.  Thanks for the temp advice.  There are a lot of contradictory instructions out there as you mentioned.  I assumed the 250 was to get the bark and then dropping it was to let it finish out slow and low.  I will try to get some pictures up soon.  Need to get this thing cooking.
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,778
    Great score with the point only.  Just jump on the horse and run the cook.  Note how it turns out and then change it up (one variable at a time) for the next one.  
    With the point you have such a well-marbled hunk of protein that you will get a great result.  Likely will hit the finish-line at around 210*F+/-.  Higher than the temp you will generally read about when the flat probes like buttah but that will ensure a good rendering of all the fat.  FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 605
    I'll second the attaboy on getting he point. Is it separated completely from the flat or did you just get that end of the brisket? In any case, the odds are good for success. Rub on some seasoning and go low and slow at about 275*. Once you have the bark you want, wrap in foil or butcher paper and throw it back on until you hit about 205-210. Let it rest in a cooler for an hour or so before unwrapping. Enjoy
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • When I started smoking brisket I wrongly believed that low and slow was 225 degrees. It took 7 poorly prepared briskets before I learned that 250-275 works best for me. 

    Great suggestion above to change one variable per cook until you get the results you are striving for.
    Somewhere in Colorado
    LBGE, PGS A40 Gasser
  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    edited September 2017


    Went with a worsh, salt, cider vinegar and sugar injection.  Used DP Cowlick after coating it with honey/mustard. 
  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    edited September 2017


    Locked in at 240 so that should be good.  Used apple chips after soaking them and 2 large chunks of cherry.
  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    Teefus said:
    I'll second the attaboy on getting he point. Is it separated completely from the flat or did you just get that end of the brisket? In any case, the odds are good for success. Rub on some seasoning and go low and slow at about 275*. Once you have the bark you want, wrap in foil or butcher paper and throw it back on until you hit about 205-210. Let it rest in a cooler for an hour or so before unwrapping. Enjoy
    Seperated it completely.  Should have got his name I guess so I could keep coming back to him! 
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    That looks like the flat to me.  Very lean.  The point has two muscles and a fat band between them.  Getting a flat to be moist is a real challenge.   When cooking a whole packer, that's what separated good from great.  When doing it without the attached fat-laden point it is even harder to achieve.  Wrapping in foil might be a good idea.  

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 605
    edited September 2017
    Foghorn said:
    That looks like the flat to me.  Very lean.  The point has two muscles and a fat band between them.  Getting a flat to be moist is a real challenge.   When cooking a whole packer, that's what separated good from great.  When doing it without the attached fat-laden point it is even harder to achieve.  Wrapping in foil might be a good idea.  
    Agreed. Or at least the flat side of the point end. Here's a point I separated and trimmed myself. 


    Michiana, South of the border.
  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    I thought point was the thicker end of the briskett.  Neither half looked like the above picture.  Is it possible that there was no point on the entire cut?
  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    Foghorn said:
    That looks like the flat to me.  Very lean.  The point has two muscles and a fat band between them.  Getting a flat to be moist is a real challenge.   When cooking a whole packer, that's what separated good from great.  When doing it without the attached fat-laden point it is even harder to achieve.  Wrapping in foil might be a good idea.  
    Well this sucks.  $32 for a piece of jerky is not cool.  When you say wrap it in foil do you mean during cooking or letting it rest after done?  Should there be anything in the foil? 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,778
    Now that the pics are up I agree with the flat cut.  That said, here's a recipe that has gotten great comments:
    http://biggreenegg.com/recipes/brisket-flat/  Give it a look.  
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    Get it to about 160 so there will be some bark, then wrap it in aluminum foil and cook it until it is done by normal standards (probes easily sometime after it passes 190 degrees).  A lot of people do add some liquid - beef broth... coffee... apple juice... whatever - and for a flat that mat be a good idea.

    If it finishes early just leave it in the foil and put it in a cooler after preheating the cooler with a hot, wet towel.

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • BwillBwill Posts: 88


    Hit 160.  Wrapped in foil.  When I lifted it with tongs to put in foil juice squirted out.  I am taking that as a good sign.  Does brisket stall like shoulder?  I am guessing I still have a couple of hours left.
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    Yes it stalls. Foil will minimize that. And the fact that it is a flat.  

    Looking good so far. 

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 605
    I'm guessing you have 3-4 more hours at least. Get the internal to at least 205 and hold it there for a while. Wrap it up in a towel and put it in a cooler for an hour or so after that. Sometimes I just shut my Egg down and let it sit wrapped up as the temp falls. 

    Most first briskets wind up undercooked. The meat will tell you when it's done. It will probe like you're sticking a fork in Jello. 
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    Ok so it is just reaching 200.  Not sure how this is possible for 4 lbs of meet.  This has now become tomorrow's dinner.  I am now left with the dilemma of what to do.  I can let it cook another hour but will not have time to let it rest.  Also need to figure out how to re-heat it best.
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    Foil it and refrigerate it. To reheat, put a little liquid in the foil and put it in the oven at 300 for 40 minutes or so.  Check it every 10 minutes after that.  When it seems warm (steam on opening) take it out. 

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    Get it to 205-ish when I reheat it?
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    No. Really just have to get it to 140 to kill bacteria. Then you have 4 hours to eat or refrigerate it. But if you overshoot 140 some it shouldn't hurt it. Most people hold food at 170 or so. 

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    Ok thanks Fog you have really been a big help today.

    I grabbed a slice before putting in the fridge.  Figured 12+ hours I wasn't going to just put it in the fridge.  Thought it was pretty damn good.
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,492
    Excellent. 

    Glad I could help. 

    The members of this forum have helped me more times than I can count. 

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 605
    Bwill said:
    Ok so it is just reaching 200.  Not sure how this is possible for 4 lbs of meet.  This has now become tomorrow's dinner.  I am now left with the dilemma of what to do.  I can let it cook another hour but will not have time to let it rest.  Also need to figure out how to re-heat it best.
    Don't feel bad. It happened to me the first time too. I'd raise the dome temp to 275-300 next time. There's usually a fair bit of difference between dome temp and grille temp.
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • kl8tonkl8ton Posts: 2,296
    We have all been there.  I am all too familiar with overshooting the deadline on cooks.  Pork butt for my son's birthday party years ago when I was a rookie. . . while butts were still cooking, I was headed to Famous Dave's to buy enough food to feed everyone.  Thankgiving turkey was about 2 hours late once as well.  I haven't had these problems in several years as I have gotten use to timing things out.  Also, realizing how much earlier you can start is a big help.  The brisket I did this weekend sat on the counter for an hour before i started cutting it, and it was still at 165 IT at that point.  You can hold foods for quite a while (hours) in a cooler wrapped in foil and towels with no ill effect on the end product.  

    On a side note:  Is that a Bernese Mountain Dog in your profile pic?  We just bought a Berner puppy over memorial day weekend.  Great Dogs!

     
    LBGE - 36Blackstone
    Grand Rapids MI
  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 605
    Bwill said:
    I thought point was the thicker end of the briskett.  Neither half looked like the above picture.  Is it possible that there was no point on the entire cut?
    The point muscle is on the thick end, but it's a separate muscle separated by a thick band of fat from the flat. My photo above reflects a point muscle that's been surgically removed from the whole brisket and trimmed of extra fat. The front end of this video shows the process:



    The piece you have looks like the point end of the flat.
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • BwillBwill Posts: 88
    Anyone have a good video and slicing brisket? I went on YouTube and the first video I watched the guy cut all the bark off of it. I checked out a couple others but the comments people were saying they were doing them wrong.
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