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Is your Big Green Egg still cooking even though it’s cold out? We hope so! We love the opportunity to cook heartier meals on the EGG during the winter. Some recipes you definitely want to try are Double Smoked Potatoes, BBQ Chicken Soup, Monte Cristo Sandwich and Breakfast Quiche. These are sure to keep your stomach warm & full! We can’t wait to see what winter-inspired dishes you cook!

Big Green Egg headquarters has moved - come visit our new showroom and check out the History of the EGG Museum and the Culinary Center too!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

stlcharcoal

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  • Re: I ❤️ firecraft

    @News2u... Call me stupid but I haven't a clue what's in the bowl..

    Looks like an olive, but refracted because of the water and glass.

    I don't get the reference, but that's all I can see. 
  • Re: How Low Can You Hold Temps With Controller?

    It's tough, but if you have low winter temps outside, it's easier.  You'll need to pack the charcoal together.  If you have a coffee can, short chimney starter, or even better some firebricks, use them to keep 3-4# in a smaller firebox.  The smaller fireball will have to maintain temp, but a lot of the heat will be lost by heating the rest of the Egg then radiating off the surface.

    If it's cold out sometimes you can get away with just only filling the firebox 1/3-1/2 of the way, but with the charcoal in a flat/thin layer, once it burns down the temp drops and the fire goes out.  Need to keep it closer together and insulated. 
  • Re: XXL FOR SALE

    Yeah, this is one I'd forego a craigslist deal for a warranty.  Anything breaks on that one and it's going to be a pain and costly to replace.

    I still think it's BS that a "lifetime" warranty is only for the original purchaser.  If these things last forever, there's no reason not to warranty them forever as they pass through generations in a family.  If they want to be anal about the receipt.....fine (even though I think that's BS too because there are no "counterfeit" BGEs.)  You should be able to gift or bequest it someone with the warranty staying in force.  Take a page from the firearm industry--product liability last forever, so warranty your product forever regardless of who owns it.  I'll get off my soapbox.....  B)
  • Re: Is this normal for Rockwood?

    That looks about right for a bag that has traveled the distance it has.  I can tell by the color and reflection that it's probably 80%+ carbon like it should be.  That makes it brittle and it's going to break everytime the bag is moved.  If you ship a bag of potato chips or box Frosted Flakes, if doesn't matter how much bubble wrap you put around it, the agitation break it down.

    In the US, you're going to be hard pressed to consistently find chunks of charcoal that are big and round because this industry uses slab wood.  You'll get some cord wood or thicker slabs, but a majority is thinner slabs.  Take a magazine and fold it in half longways--that's about the biggest piece you'll get on average.  You can thank the saw mill's technology, EPA, and DNR for limiting this.  In foreign countries they can afford to harvest trees to make charcoal, then slow burn in a kiln without the pull of a smoke burner.  So you get the big grapefruit sized chunks.  But I would wager the insides are not fully carbonized with the wood being as dense as it is.  I could be wrong, but I've never seen any testing results from independent labs on any other charcoal product.

    We could guarantee larger chunks, but I'm going to be selling you a bag of
    "charred wood" rather than "charcoal".  It will take less time to kiln, produce less fines, and use a small bag since it weighs more per volume.  Win-win-win for profits, but everyone is going to hate it since it's going to smoke like crazy and not achieve high temps until the wood burns out.

    You'll do just fine with what is pictured.....you have a better fire grate, and that's all you need in the end.  Have fun!
  • Re: Lump Charcoal

    Wow! I just priced Rockwood at Firecraft. Didn't realize it was that expensive. AND you have to buy $100 worth or it's even more expensive! Good thing I'm happy with the more affordable RO. Locally available and no $100 minimum. Rockwood is apparently good stuff, but i just think that's too much to pay for charcoal. 

    If I wanted to go top tier, I could head about 35 miles up the road To the Wicked Good distribution center. About $13-14 per 22 lb bag. But you do have to buy a bunch. RO for me I guess. 

    I think you would be very pleased with the price you would find here in St. Louis.  Shipping the pallets 900 miles to Philly, then shipping 4-5 bags for "free", adds in to that per bag price quickly.  I can't believe what people pay for charcoal on the coastline, but I'm sure they don't believe what we pay for seafood or certain fruits here in the Midwest.  LOL