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evenwhenitsraining

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evenwhenitsraining
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  • So basically I just leaned one against the other and by the time they cooked the next day, they had shrunk and were both fitting nicely side by side in the BGE.  And yes, I realize I'm commenting on my own post four years later.  Lot has been happen…
  • I dry my chicken, brush with olive oil, season liberally with S&P, and then I roast the bird with the indirect plate setter at 425-450 for about 75 minutes for a 3-4 lb. bird.  Basically, I let the thing go until the skin is golden and I can begin t…
  • A lot of us on the forum follow nakedwhiz.com for advice when we don't want to wade through the forums.  
  • Remember that you can always buy a cast iron grate for the Egg, as well.  Cast Iron is all I use now. 
  • Sea bass is done when it begins to flake apart with a fork.  If you can't flake it, it's still not quite done in the middle.  It's not like salmon, which is delicious medium rare.  Sea bass needs a med well.  Besides, it has so much fat in it, it do…
  • I find that the butcher's have usually cut the BB's in half to put them out on the shelves.  You can call ahead and ask them not to do so.  When I do this, I usually get two 10-12 lb. BB's.  This helps for the timing of the BB's so you can do the ov…
  • I do slightly disagree with the crowd here, I love my CI grid and use it for everything.  I just grilled some sturgeon on it last night (beveled side, not the flat side) and it turned out great.  I do think that it adds both flavor and presentation …
  • @ Jolly Bill, I am also a huge fan of the Aleppo peppers for shaking on pizza and pasta, however, I still like the flavor of crushed red peppers for Arabbiata or Puttanesca sauces. 
  • Worked in high-end restaurants for 14 years; not Applebee's, more like $125/plate kind-of-joints. Bottom line, your turkey is just fine. You wouldn't believe how long we store stuff in restaurants. As long as it's been consistently chilled, a lot …
  • Hhhhmmmmmmmm, I've never had an issue maintaining 225 dome temp. In fact, once the egg is stabilized, I've always enjoyed rock steady dome temps at 225 for upwards of 24 hours; and then, I killed the fire. I wonder how long it can go before dying …
  • Given that a turkey is going to take a bit longer than a chicken, I'd recommend indirect.
  • I agree with Stike, basting does nothing.
  • BTW, I was not intentionally contradicting Little Chef's advice. We must have been typing our posts at the same time. Why "Little" Chef?
  • Many suggest that when substituting dried for fresh that you cut the amount that you use. I however substitute equal amounts dried for fresh due to the fact that many dried herbs have diminished flavor. You have to remember that turkey is a BIG bi…
  • You gotta got folks some slack. Thanksgiving dinner is like asking people to home run when you only take a swing once a year. It's not easy for most to pull off. (I myself could do it blind, but hey . . .)
  • If you ever get a hold of it, duck fat, by far, creates the tastiest roasted potatoes.
  • Even if you can't find that exact recipe, it's a classic southern pie, sometimes called Derby Pie.
  • When you're talking least expensive, it doesn't really apply to Prime Rib. Costco is always a good option. I looked at Prime Rib last week and it was $8.49/lb. at Costco. It's usually double that at a grocery or butcher.
  • The cut of meat is going to be called a standing rib roast, or boneless prime rib roast. I suggest the standing rib roast with bone in, it's more impressive and many swear that cooking the roast with the bone in flavors the meat. I do know this, t…
  • It won't really matter whether you brine before or after the spatchcock.
  • I agree with you and others on this post, I would cook it as a roast. Like the other guys said, let it rest on the counter top for a good hour before grilling (I like to rub it with EVOO, S&P at this time) and pull it at 125 internal temp, cover wi…
  • Also, the brine rapidly thaws the turkey versus leaving it to thaw in the fridge. Even if your brine is ice cold, the turkey thaws much faster because the water density is much greater than air density. Less hassle that way! Also, it can't hurt to…
  • I see a lot of people answered with manufactured rubs. If you don't want to venture to the store I would use a mixture of kosher salt, brown sugar, sweet paprika, oregano, thyme, mustard, cinnamon, and cocoa powder. Try it!
  • So, were you successful? I remember cooking my first Boston Butt and I too was amazed that the temperature stayed rock steady at 225-250 for 20 hours, and I don't have a single fancy gadget that I use. It's like sex, after the first time, all the…
  • I agree, do a high temp burn and don't open the dome while you're doing it. Also, I've heard of some who wad up some aluminum foil after the burn and then gently rub the interior of the egg to make sure everything has flaked off the dome and doesn'…
  • I've never had luck with direct. I always cook my chicken spatchcock over the platesetter at about 425-450 for 1 - 1-1/2 hrs. Works out great but I can see wanting to have a little bit of blackened edges or grill markes. If you have good gloves…
  • If you have a way of doing it, then props to you. However, I worked for the Capital Grille for 5 years or so and the meat locker in those steakhouses smells something terrible. Good for you handling sub-primals. Most home cooks don't have the nut…
  • Look, I worked in high-end steakhouses for about 10 years. Dry-aging steak is really a process that doesn't save you money or time. (Kind of like making your own beer. Just don't do it.) Just leave it to the pros. Besides, proper dry-aging stinks…
  • I'm sure you've been bombarded by advice from the forum, but with me, you're going to get restaurant advice. I worked in high-end fine-dining for about 15 years total, most of that in $$$$$ steakhouses. My two cents: Not everything needs smoke …
  • BTW, there's no reason you can't ask a dealer for a break even if the Egg isn't on sale. Just make sure no one else is standing around so he won't feel pressured to extend the deal to anyone who might overhear.
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