Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...

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We hope you all got to celebrate those tasty food holidays last week, we sure enjoyed them! We are even more excited about the beginning of fall, for so many reasons, but mainly for experiencing the cool, crisp air while being outside cooking up the best recipes the season has to offer. We especially love these Beer Pork Tenderloin and Ground Beef Acorn Squash recipes! Fall is upon us, and it's a great time for getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

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  • bbqdiva,[p]This is a 16 lb. bird. I'm a big fan of spatchcocking: the breast and legs get done at the same time, it looks terrific, and carving is a snap, especially if you cut out the wishbone before cooking.[p]I put a plate setter on the main…
  • Nice to see you too, bud.
  • Wardster,[p]Oh you're all making me blush. The dear Toad and Julie told me my name came up, so I wandered over to say hello. Thanks for thinking of me! [p]My turkey is a heritage bird with great flavor, so I'm keeping the prep simple: butterflie…
  • WMK,[p]JJ was my mentor when I first started Egging, and after we met at the '99 Eggtoberfest he became my friend. He may have had some rough edges, but he was solid gold inside - a sweet guy, a helluva cook, and a fine drinking buddy. I'm glad I …
    in Sad news Comment by Cat March 2003
  • Toe 49,[p]I'm glad your bird was great! I've added shredded prosciutto to the stuffing on occasion, so I'll bet the sausage worked well.[p]Our butterflied turkey disappeared, helped along by my 18 year old nephew who's spending the weekend with us.…
  • CptQueeg,[p]This is a wonderful hunk of meat. I don't bother removing the center vein - easier to cook, and easy to slice out when you serve.[p]Hangers are so fibrous that they take a marinade better than most steaks. Great beef flavor even withou…
  • Hi Carey![p]No, my whole family was in town from Denver. But in the Eggfest spirit, I had them all over for dinner last night.[p]I hope to make Atlanta...[p]Cathy
  • Franco,[p]Make a paste of crushed garlic, Dijon mustard, soy sauce, olive oil and chopped rosemary. Spread this on the leg a few hours before cooking.[p]Set the leg on a rack over a small drip pan, and set the pan directly on the grill. Dome temp …
  • Ellen aka Gormay,[p]All good advice. A few key points to keep in mind:[p]Fluctuations in dome temp aren't a big deal. Over a long cook, it's average temp that counts.[p]The plateau can happen anywhere from 140-170 internal.[p]Time-per-pound direct…
  • Andrew Flashback,[p]You don't have to wait until your platesetter arrives. Butterfly the bird and cook it direct. The way I do it is linked below. [p]This method has many virtues: fast, simple, endless flavoring options (marinades, rubs, stuffing…
  • Byrdman,[p]I'm not sure where you're based, but if you're a fellow Yankee - and it wasn't your first cook - do pulled pork. It's delicious, easy, your pals probably haven't had much experience with it, and it makes any evening a party.[p]A lightly …
  • Hey Chris -[p]Gosh, you're good.[p]GaDawg, check out the link below - very helpful article.[p]Cathy [ul][li]Ready for Brine Time[/ul]
  • Bubbles,[p]Is this the one you're looking for? If not, try it anyway - fantastic.[p]Cathy [ul][li]Char Buddy's Tandoori Drumsticks[/ul]
  • davidm,[p]Yes!! Thickness is more important than weight in determining cooking time. [p]Cathy
  • Hiya WD -[p]I've been great, just busy - lots going on, including a whole-pig roast my boss is hosting at the end of the month. I'm hoping the chief chef (Daniel Boulud, no less) will let me help out with the prep work. [p]My plans to be at Eggfes…
  • Vegas Slim,[p]Ignore the pop-up. If you have an instant-read thermometer, shoot for about 165 in the breast - and let the bird rest for 20 minutes after you take it off before you carve. [p]Butterflied big chix on the Egg are terrific - enjoy![p]Ca…
  • Jamesw,[p]Oiling the skin will help. So will cooking at a higher temperature; I do butterflied chicken direct at about 300 dome. Flip the skin side toward the fire for the last 15-20 minutes of cooking.[p]Cathy
  • Dooms Dave,[p]If it's a bone-in leg, or boned/rolled/tied, I put the lamb on a rack in a small drip pan and set the pan directly on the grill. Dome temp of 350. Roast to an internal temp of 125 for medium rare, and let the meat rest for 20 minutes…
  • JBC,[p]I do this with guinea hens, so it would be good for pheasant too. They'll take less time than hens or chickens do.[p]Last time I substituted plum jam for the honey. Very tasty, and the skin was gorgeous brown.[p]Cathy [ul][li]Honey mustar…
  • Nature Boy,[p]Fortified wines (including port, sherry & madeira) are jazzed with extra alcohol - in the form of wine, brandy, or neutral spirits. Screwtop optional.[p]Cathy
  • Charcoal Mike,[p]Water in the drip pan will not steam the meat; the moisture it adds to the total volume of air inside the Egg is negligible.[p]Water does act as a heat baffle. As long as there is liquid in the pan, its temp won't go over 212 degre…
  • Spring Chicken,[p]I think the volatiles in the bourbon would burn off very fast, and wouldn't contribute any flavor - unless you soaked the wood a long time, like a Jack Daniels barrel.[p]A better use for the bourbon: Gretl's fabulous salmon.[p]Cath…
  • DUTCH ,[p]Excellent advice about pre-heating the water - otherwise the fire has to do it for you.[p]But I recommend you pour the bourbon (or juice) into the chef instead. Flavored liquids in the drip pan don't add any flavor to the meat. [p]Cathy
  • Marv,[p]Foil isn't my preference, but it might be what David R needs to achieve the brisket of his dreams. Hey, if you're gonna invest all that time and effort in barbeque, it should end up the way you want it! [p]Foil on your TV antenna, huh? Ti…
  • Jim Minion,[p]Wow. It took Harold McGee several pages to make the same point! ;-} [p]I've learned a lot from your posts on Basso's board (like the apple juice tactic for reheating brisket), and it's good to have your perspective here. [p]Cathy …
  • DavidR,[p]Well, your setup and cooking temps sound fine. Is it possible you're cooking too long? Try the initial fork test at 185. Other than that, all I can suggest is trying a different source for the meat. [p]Or maybe this is just an example …
  • DavidR,[p]After reading all the good suggestions below, I'd like to underscore Jim's point: it's the fat/collagen breaking down that makes a tender, juicy brisket. That process starts around 150-160, and it takes hours. A brisket that's been idlin…
  • DrummerDawg,[p]As long as there was adequate airflow, doing two butts wasn't the problem. Did you fork-test in several places? [p]I've done 2 butts of similar size and shape, side by side, and still seen a big difference in the length of the stall.…
    in Dual Butts Comment by Cat February 2002
  • DrummerDawg,[p]The stall is when the internal fat & collagen are breaking down - and that's what makes a butt juicy and tender. Sounds like these butts may not have spent enough time there; next time, let them stall for as long as they like! E…
    in Dual Butts Comment by Cat February 2002
  • Beefeater,[p]Up.[p]Cathy
    in Brisket Comment by Cat February 2002