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Did I ruin my brisket?

LakeEggLakeEgg Posts: 8
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
First time smoking a brisket. Started it last night around 8:00. Went to bed around 11:00 and everything was good. Woke up at 5:30 fire out and everything cold. Apparently I didn't get the alarms set right on my thermometer. I have no idea how long the fire was out and the food was back to 90 degrees. Got the fire restarted and now cooking back around 250 degrees. Question is did I ruin the brisket? Is it safe to eat once I get it done which I understand is 195 to 200? Thanks!

Comments

  • Jupiter JimJupiter Jim Posts: 1,614
    LakeEgg,
    I'm not an expert but the danger zone is simple it must be below 40 degrees or above 140 to be safe. if it is between that temp range for more than 4 hours it should be considered not safe. I can tell you that the food COPS would say don't eat it. The bacteria would only be on the outside of the meat and not internal, and if cooked to 200 you might kill any bad bacteria. A lot of if in your question. Hopefully others will chime in.
    Jupiter Jim
    I'm only hungry when I'm awake!
  • I would cook till done and eat and enjoy.
    I think if you cook till 190 you should be fine.
    just my opinion and i would eat it.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,171
    If you were in food service, you would be obliged to toss the brisket. You have 4 hours allowed in the 40 - 140 degree before cooking, and 2 hours after. Because you have no way of knowing how long it was cooling, you would have to suppose it was over 2 hours.

    I too would guess it is O.K. to finish the cook, altho the longer time will probably mean a drier finished product. I wouldn't serve it to anyone under 6 or over 70. Youngsters and elders are about 400% more likely to suffer from food poisoning than healthy middle-agers.

    I always get myself up at least once during over-nighters. Only caught a fire going out once, but was happy to save 10 lbs of pork.
  • 61chev61chev Posts: 539
    Even if it went out right after you checked it it would have taken at least 2 or more hous to cool off I personally would not worry about it
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