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What has your experience been?

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Comments

  • Ditto for me on 2Fategghead and GG. I find new lump takes longer to get to temp, but not much. The MAPP makes it so much easier to start 'er up than anything else I have tried, regardless of old or new.

    Smokin'Stogies in Exton, Pa with my wife and our four dogs; Sully and Boo the Newfoundlands, Murphy the Irish Setter and Alli the Beagle/Lab mix. 

    Eggers Prayer-

    Our egg, which art in sizes, hallowed be thy smoke, thy will be grilled, at home as it is at eggfest. Give us this clay our daily brisket and forgive us our rubs, as we forgive those who gas grill against us, and lead us not to flashback but deliver us from overnighters. For thine is the grill, the smoke, the egg. Let's eat!

  • Ditto for me on 2Fategghead and GG. I find new lump takes longer to get to temp, but not much. The MAPP makes it so much easier to start 'er up than anything else I have tried, regardless of old or new.

    Smokin'Stogies in Exton, Pa with my wife and our four dogs; Sully and Boo the Newfoundlands, Murphy the Irish Setter and Alli the Beagle/Lab mix. 

    Eggers Prayer-

    Our egg, which art in sizes, hallowed be thy smoke, thy will be grilled, at home as it is at eggfest. Give us this clay our daily brisket and forgive us our rubs, as we forgive those who gas grill against us, and lead us not to flashback but deliver us from overnighters. For thine is the grill, the smoke, the egg. Let's eat!

  • too much thinking, you're making my brain hurt! :laugh:

    Of everyone who finds the used lump ignites faster and gets up to temp quicker- is there anyone who does not start their fire with some kind of torch?

    that might be the difference.
  • Clay QClay Q Posts: 4,435
    Morning Ben.
    The fire will burn downward twards the grate, the source of air flowing into the firebox. When adding fresh lump to recharge an established fire the burn must climb in the opposite direction of the air source hence the difficulty of clearing out startup smoke/stink.

    Geee, it's another beautiful day! Think I'll fire up the small egg and roast squash for dinner. The large egg will be busy with pan fried catfish. :)

    Have a nice day Ben.
  • Clay QClay Q Posts: 4,435
    I build a new fire each time I start up an egg using the old lump from the previous fire in a chimney and it starts up faster than fresh lump. It's pre-conditioned. ;)
  • Sounds like a wonderful idea, Clay. I might have to join you on the squash. I've got a few dozen squash in several varieties from the garden. 'Tis the season! I'm thinking acorn squash, grilled potato rounds, and chicken thighs.
  • Clay QClay Q Posts: 4,435
    Yummmmy.

    I've been cooking thighs skinless/boneless. One way I make'em, marinated in olive oil and lemon juice, cracked pepper, Dizzy Pig Swamp Venom and salt. No skin, less fat, more flavor and easy to eat.
    Have fun cooking. I have delicata and butternut squash.
  • Sounds delicious, Clay. Might have to give that a try tonight.

    We have delicata, acorn, butternut, spaghetti, sugar pumpkin, turban, and humbolt. For some reason, though, many of the varieties look pretty small. I haven't eaten any yet, but the family we garden with tried a few acorn squash and said they're not spectacular. Oddly, the couple volunteer squash that popped up from last year's crop were much more productive. The fruit on them are huge, but since they're cross-pollinated, they're a little...different. I hear from the other family that they're tasty, though. Looking forward to trying them all.

    I'm pretty bummed about the butternut in particular. Our family has an awesome butternut squash dish (similar to candied yams) that we have for thanksgiving and christmas every year, and I was looking forward to using squash from the garden, but we only wound up with a few very small butternuts...oh well. No idea why our winter squash did so poorly. The summer squash planted on the same side of the garden did VERY well.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,919
    how large of a garden plot do you have? Sounds like the back 40 acres to me! :laugh:
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • 60'x60'. Ish. Practically in Nancy's back yard. Separated in half by a fencerow with grapes and hops (both new, no fruit).

    South half had peas, beets, carrots and parsnips, turnips, radishes, lettuces, chard, a variety of onions, potatoes, a dozen bell pepper plants, a dozen chiles (all peppers did VERY well), three dozen tomatoes, cabbages, brussels sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, kale, eggplant, okra.

    North half had beans, summer squash (went gangbusters), cukes, corn (total failure), melons (total failure), and was nearly half winter squash.

    This summer was my first adult experience gardening, and my first ever with a garden this big. It was an enormous amount of work, and I didn't do half of it. But the results have been fantastic. Nearly everything is gone now, except for the stuff that lasts through the frost (kale, brussels sprouts, etc). Last weekend we harvested about half of our potatoes, and split them 50/50...I brought home about 30 pounds, I think. Still have a lot of unripened tabasco chiles on their plant. Not sure if they'll ripen before frost, and not sure what to do with them if they don't. Brand new freezer is full of beans, peas, peppers, zucchini bread, etc. Cabinets full of jars of tomatoes, pickles, etc. Crawl space full of squash, potatoes, onions. A lot of hard work this summer, but a lot of fun.

    I am REALLY excited for the brussels sprouts to be ready to start harvesting. Love 'em...especially roasted under anything wrapped in bacon!
    IMG_1936.jpg
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,919
    did you have to haul water? For a few years a neighbor had a half acre garden on some land out in the country. He built himself a trailer with a large fiberglass tank to haul water - eventually it just became too much work and he quit renting the plot. While he was gardening though his industrious pre-teen son had a "market stand" on Saturdays in our neighborhood and did well as he had good produce!
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • No, this was not a rented lot. The garden belongs to friends of ours who live in an old farmhouse. They don't own the rest of the farm, just the acre or two around the house and barn. There's a water spigot at either end of the garden plot.
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