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Opinions about v-rack and whole turkey wanted:

edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I want to roast a turkey that is put in the egg the traditional way to compare it to a vertically roasted turkey, which I have already attempted with good success.[p]My question -- is it better to use the v-rack, or just to set the bird on top of the main grid? If you put it in the v-rack, do I then put it directly into a drip pan, or should I put the drip pan on top of my inverted plate setter, then the grid, then the v-rack? Seems like the latter way would allow for better smoke circulation but also might compromise the drippings for later gravy-making.[p]Opinions are most welcome![p]Thanks...

Comments

  • tmEGGertmEGGer Posts: 92
    Bulldog Bob,[p]I had used 3 firebricks on the grid, then a vertical roaster inside a disposable foil drip pan on top. I had great turkey, but the downside is that the top of the 14# turkey was just about hitting the top of the inside of the dome and the end of the dome thermometer. [p]I belive a v-rack would allow a larger bird.[p]Also, my wife insists that cooking breast-side down keeps the breast moister than other positions. HTH[p]NutmEGGer
  • willmwwillmw Posts: 41
    Bulldog Bob,
    I always put a drip pan on the main grid, set the vrack in it and put the turkey on the rack, breast down. Never been disappointed, except for the "look" of the bird with the rack marks on the breast.

  • tmEGGertmEGGer Posts: 92
    willmw,[p]Do you use a platesetter beneath the grid or firebricks or any other mass?[p]Thanks,
    NutmEGGer

  • Bulldog Bob,
    You should put the turkey in the v-rack then in the drip pan directly on the main grid. The reason is you are going to put enough broth and water in the pan that it will not run dry but will be added to by the drippings from the turkey and make one hell of a pan of dripping for the gravy you will ultimately make from it. If you have brined the bird you will need to be careful not to salt the gravy or it will be too much. I also have to say that the vertical even though I have never used one, in my opinion would not be as good a the v-rack or at least not if you butter the breast the way I do. I season a cup of softened butter and when the butter is cold again I slide it under the skin of the breast and rub some of it on the outside to keep the meat moist. If it was in a vertical it probably would run out faster, not sure.

  • willmwwillmw Posts: 41
    NutmEGGer,
    No, I have not done that so I cannot say how that would affect the outcome.

  • nikkignikkig Posts: 514
    Bulldog Bob,
    I hate using a v-rack. IMO it is just one more thing to have to wash. We never use the plate setter either unless we are doing pizzas. We put our turkeys on a raised grid with the drip pan underneath on the main grid. Comes out perfect every time. [p]~nikki

  • RichRich Posts: 67
    NutmEGGer,
    The past 3 years I have brined the turkey and used a vertical roaster. I use a pizza stone, small ceramic spacers then the drip pan. The spacers keep the juices from burning. An 18 lb turkey will barely fit in a large BGE. The turkeys are the best I have ever cooked.

  • Thanks for all the input! I'll post my results Sunday or Monday.[p]Thanks,[p]BB

  • Bulldog Bob,
    i do my turkey in the egg the traditional way, in a roasting pan, but rather than a v-rack, i have a small metal grate that looks like a trivet that the bird rests on, so it is down in the roasting pan, but about a 1/2 inch above the pan. . .i put this on the main grid, but i have a water pan under it in order to deflect the heat (maintaining and oven type roasting) . . .i still stick a nice chunk of apple wood in the fire, so i do have some smoke. . .i roast at traditional oven temps of 325 dome temp. . ..what i end up with is a very traditional roasted turkey with a nice hint of smoke, and a pan full of great dripping that make for the best gravy ever. ..

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