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New Rib Rub

Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,298
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Howdy. I have been working on a rub for ribs with a slight Asian flavor. I want a dry rub for when I don't have time to marinate. Used it last night on some mustard slathered spare ribs, and it was pretty good. Still not sure all what it needs, but it needs more color for sure. [p]Brant was mentioning paprika is a base for most rubs, and is used mainly for color, and because it has a mild flavor and can be used in bulk to create a "base" for the rub. This rub I came up with has no paprika, but could use something red. Suggestions??? here is what I did...it was enough for 2 slabs.[p]NB's beta Rib Rub:
1/8 cup brown sugar
1 tsp garlic salt
1 tsp kosher salt
1 tsp crushed corriander seeds
1 tsp cracked tellicherry pepper
1 tsp yellow mustard seeds
1 tsp ginger powder (I just ordered "cracked ginger" from Penzeys, wonder how that is??)
1/2 tsp dried cilantro
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp cayenne
1/8 tsp dried orange peel[p]Anything jump out as being out of balance? Suggestions for additions/deletions?? Any other mild red/orange spice??[p]Thanks
NB

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Comments

  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Nature Boy,
    You are heading to another favorite area of mine, Indian Cooking.
    The only addition would be some cumin. Other than that you have fine Marsala (spice mixture).
    Definitely try some with the paprika; the flavors will mix well.[p]Some other spices that could be added are Fenugreek or Star Anise. You could also substitute Black Mustard Seeds for the Yellow ones.[p]I like the Orange Peel addition.[p]Hope this helps,
    RhumAndJerk[p]

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,298
    RhumAndJerk,
    Thank you sir. Always fresh ideas from your end. I need to try some different kinds of paprika. Haven't been happy with the ones I have tried. Would like to try the fenugreek, as it is nearly untouched in my spice cabinet. Anise would be good in moderation probably. We could be onto something.[p]Thanks again
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • JimWJimW Posts: 450
    Nature Boy,
    The 'hot' Hungarian paprika is good. It isn't all that hot either.
    JimW

  • Lee2Lee2 Posts: 38
    Nature Boy,
    As R&J said garam masala would probably work well with the spices you have listed. Other than that, maybe some Chinese 5 spice?

  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Nature Boy,
    Email me. I will hook you up with quality paprika.
    R&J

  • SmokeySmokey Posts: 2,468
    Nature Boy,[p]For what it's worth, I really like the addition od sage to many rubs. It seems to add a nice comliment to many spicy rubs (things with cyanne peper).[p]Smokey[p]
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,298
    Lee2,
    I will order some of the garam marsala from penzeys. Chinese five spice would be good probably. I have been paranoid with that stuff as sometimes that is all you taste! Still experimenting with how much of that stuff to use.[p]I have some chipotle coming, so I will try that. I wonder if there is a mild dried pepper I can use besides paprika. Maybe I will check the Latino market. And the Indian market. And they just opened up a Caribbean (ap?) food market. Onward.[p]Thanks
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,298
    Smokey,
    Yeah. I need to experiment more with sage. You usually taste in in the southern style rubs (I remember tasting it heavy in Southwestern Spicy Char Crust). Elder says it is the main spice in many sausages. That would be a fun one to try. I also have a bottle of it from penzeys.[p]BTW, I have heard the wood from the sage plant makes a very unique and tasty smoking wood.[p]Thanks!
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,298
    JimW,
    Maybe I will try that. Thought it might be too spicy, so I haven't picked any up. I will get some.[p]I heard it really makes a difference how fresh it is...unfortunately, at the grocery stores, there is no way of telling. Onward![p]Thanks
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • SmokeySmokey Posts: 2,468
    Nature Boy,[p]My order from Penzey came in the other day. The smell fantastic. Will give a followup report after the weekend. My order fom Omaha Steaks aslo came in yesterday (I'm not impressed, but have not cooked em).[p] I saw something good on food tv tonight. The idea of using toasting the spices before grinding them in a spare pepper mill for fresh rub sounds like a winner. I guess I'll be getting another pepper in the next day or so! See below![p]GRILLED SALMON STEAKS
    Recipe courtesy Alton Brown[p]4 salmon steaks 1-inch thick
    1 teaspoon whole cumin seed
    1 teaspoon whole coriander seed
    1/2 teaspoon whole fennel seed
    1 teaspoon dry green peppercorns
    Sea salt or kosher salt
    Canola or olive oil to coat steaks [p]Prepare grill by lighting 4 quarts of charcoal (1 starter chimney's worth), or turning gas grill to medium-high.
    Examine steaks for pin bones by rubbing fingers over surface of meat. If found, remove with bone tweezers or pliers reserved for culinary uses. [p]Using a sharp paring or boning knife, trim bones from the cavity side of the steak. Trim the stomach flaps so that 1 side is missing about 2 inches of skin and the other, 1 inch of meat. Roll the skinless section up into the hollow of the cavity, then wrap the other around the outside to form a round resembling a filet mignon. Tie in place with 2 passes of butcher's twine. (Do not tie it too tight or fish will pop out during cooking.) [p]Combine cumin, coriander, fennel and peppercorns on a double thick piece of aluminum foil and toast over grill, shaking gently until seeds become fragrant. Crush seeds in mortar and pestle or pour into spare pepper grinder. Coat steaks lightly with oil, season with salt, then liberally grind toasted seeds on both sides of steaks. [p]Quickly wipe hot grill grate with a rag or towel dipped in a little Canola oil, then grill fish to medium rare, about 3 minutes per side. (Fish should be well colored on the outside and barely translucent at the center. [p]

  • SmokeySmokey Posts: 2,468
    Forgive my typing. My fingers are so ^$#)(&?! dumb, they can't spell worth a darn!

  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    Nature Boy,[p]I can concurr with this NB. I've used it somewhat to 'speriment with and it does add an interesting flavor to the meat. I've used it on pork and beef, not on fish yet. The stash of sage wood that I gathered from pruning that bush earlier this spring is pretty well gone. I still have a ton of the plant left and may try and soak some sage leaves rather than the woody part of the plant. Interesting and rather strong flavor, use it wisely if you try smoking with the wood, a little goes a long way.[p]Troy
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,298
    Smokey,
    Yes! Toasting seeds is a great way to bring out flavors. And I gave been using a lot of those corriander seeds (the ones from Penzeys are very tasty) [p]I suppose if you are using the spices in a rub, they will toast anyway while the meat cooks. I sometimes toast seeds when using in a marinade, as it helps get more flavor into the marinade. Try toasting sesame seeds, crush slightly, and use in Tankert Tim's Okonawan wings! Yum.[p]My latest Penzey's order should be here soon. Can't wait to try the cracked ginger, chipotle powder, cracked jalepenos.[p]Thanks for the great looking recipe.[p]NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
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  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,298
    sprinter,
    I think the spice is strong, AND the wood smoke! We have a Russian Sage plant, and the smell is strong (reminds me of the dry-cleaning chemical you used to smell at the dry-cleaners). But the flavor is unique and prominent.[p]What meats have you used sage wood smoke on??
    Thanks
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    Nature Boy,[p]I've used it on Pork Loin (whole roast) and on chicken. Chicken was good, thats where I tasted the sage the most, pretty overpowering. Pork was good too as I knew that the sage would add a pungent flavor to the meat so I was somewhat skimpy with what I added to the fire. I used it on some ribeyes once also, pretty much just burned up in the fire (seared steaks). But, even so, you could still smell the sage in the smokestack for a couple of minutes. I liked the results here the most.[p]I'm not sure what type of sage plant mine is. This spring I chopped it back from about 4 feet tall and 3 feet wide to just a few stalks coming out of the ground. It's already back to about 2 feet tall even after the transplant shock. What a weed. Interesting wood to smoke with, very distinct sage flavor that it adds.[p]Troy
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