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7.6 LB Brisket, about how long?

impag10impag10 Posts: 58
edited 10:09PM in EggHead Forum
From what I read I am looking to get the temp between 190-195, with an egg temp between 225-250. Trying to guage about how long that will take so dinner isn't too early or too late. Also, what are the best choices of wood to smoke it?
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Comments

  • 61chev61chev Posts: 539
    probably figure at least 10hr sometimes longer it will not be done til its done
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  • 61chev61chev Posts: 539
    probably figure at least 10hr sometimes longer it will not be done til its done
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  • 61chev61chev Posts: 539
    also if done to early u can wrap it in af and keep it in a cooler for a couple of hours
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  • impag10impag10 Posts: 58
    yeah I'm not going to be in any rush....any idea on what type of wood to smoke it with?
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  • Mike in AbitaMike in Abita Posts: 3,302
    Last question first, Oak or Hickory in my book. Keep you dome at 250 the whole cook. Should take about 10-12 hours depending on the cow. More important than time is doneness. Read Thirdeyes site and learn to cook brisket by feel, and use time as a general guideline. Remember no peeking, if your lookin you ain't cookin. Try and schedule it to finish about an hour before you are ready to serve. Brisket really likes a longer rest period. Double wrap in HDAF and put it in an unused over/micro/empty cooler. A few towels or old sheets for insulation and it'll last for two hours. If you finish it early you get to relax a little before guests arrive.
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  • impag10impag10 Posts: 58
    do you baste with sauce at all? guessing not seeing you said not to open it. Thanks
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  • Mike in AbitaMike in Abita Posts: 3,302
    Nope no basting. No need, you are cooking a whole brisket right? The EGG retains so much moisture in the food I don't see a benefit in basting. Heck I don't see the benefit in basting in an offset either. It's hard for me to believe a piece of cow will absorb liquid while you are driving out so much fat with heat. Might be a good way to transfer flavors to the surface but I can't get my head around the notion that it adds moisture back to the meat. I use to mop briskets on my offset but I think it was for my benefit not the end result.

    Remeber the EGG is so efficient, in the fact that it only uses enough air to maintain the set temperature. Offsets and kettles have a terible time with excess air flow that leads to the drying effect.
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  • impag10impag10 Posts: 58
    It's a 7.6 LB of Flat. Couldn't find any with the point. Heck, here is the northeast one at all was hard to find
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  • Mike in AbitaMike in Abita Posts: 3,302
    Definetly read Thirdeyes blog. I cook whole briskets, I've only done 10 flats and they are a whole different beast. Out of the 10 only 4 were what I'd call better than average. Three of those were following Wayne's advice.

    http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/03/brisket.html

    Stay with the Oak or Hickory though.
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  • pissclamspissclams Posts: 49
    impag10 wrote:
    It's a 7.6 LB of Flat. Couldn't find any with the point. Heck, here is the northeast one at all was hard to find
    you can order full packer briskets online if you ever want to try one. i've never had much luck with cooking flats on my egg.
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  • impag10impag10 Posts: 58
    what's a good place to order from? Does the point have a lot of fat that gives the rest flavor?
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  • Mike in AbitaMike in Abita Posts: 3,302
    Yes the point adds quite a bit of flavor and by buying the whole brisket you will be able to trim it down to a more manageable piece. The trimmed flats in my area are trimmed for boiled or braised brisket. Too much fat is removed. You want a decent fat cap on the brisket. That said some here have great results with flats. I just prefer whole briskets as they are a little more forgiving. Cook the brisket until you read 190 in the flat and it is fork tender then separate the point from the flat. Put the point back on for a few hours, after an hour or so chop it into nice size chunks and sauce for another hour. This is known as burnt ends and are about the best tasting thing you can pull off your grill.

    Back to the flats. The ones with success often cook them to 165 internal then wrap in foil with a little broth or stock in the package. Wrap it tight to make sure the liquid doesn't evaporate, then stab the package with your thermometer and cook it till 190. Start checking for tenderness and pull when it feels right. It's kind of a feel thing but if you've ever eaten brisket that is just perfectly tender in your opinion. Remember when you could cut it with a fork, that's the consistency you're looking for. If it is too tender all is not lost, as sometimes you can cut the slices a little thicker to make up for it falling apart while slicing. Cooked in the foil will help reduce the chance of over drying. The last and best flats I've cooked have been this way.
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  • impag10impag10 Posts: 58
    very good,thanks for all your advice!
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  • impag10impag10 Posts: 58
    very good,thanks for all your advice!
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