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Need outdoor kitchen advice...

Vol JackVol Jack Posts: 33
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I just bought an BGE and can't wait to learn how to use it.
I am about to start construction, along with a friend, on an outdoor mini-kitchen.
I am going to have the Egg, a mini fridge, side burner, and another gas grill that will be used for big family gatherings when I need to grill 25+ Burgers & dogs.

First off, I feel like I stole the Big Green Egg after I have been shopping for a Higher end Stainless steel gas grill....WOW..I did not know there was such a market for 3k and up gas grills.
My question is if i really need to buy an expensive "drop-in, built-in" grill or can an off the floor model at Lowe's or some other store and use it is a drop-in? I have found a Jenn Air 5 burner drop-in at Lowe's for $899 (more than I paid for my egg, that I plan to use 90% of the time I grill)

Thanks for any help...Vol Jack.
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Comments

  • cookn bikercookn biker Posts: 13,272
    Buy another egg. What size do you have now? Seriously, stick with the eggs. Also, have you cooked on yours yet? Do that before you do anything!!!
  • FidelFidel Posts: 10,168
    Don't kid yourself. Once you get used to the egg and appreciate the way it cooks there is no way you will use a gasser for 90% of your cooks.

    That said, I would not build in a unit not intended for that purpose. You may end up with airflow, or worse, ventilation, issues that could results in improper performance or even damage to your kitchen.
  • Jack, forget the gas grill, built in, drop in, stand alone, or otherwise, save the dough, now that you have an egg, you won't be using it. The side-burner on the other hand is a good idea, you can boil water for corn on the cob, pasta & so forth, so that will get used. I agree with Molly, just give the egg a whirl before you pull that checkbook out at the gas grill store, you'll be happy you did
  • Vol JackVol Jack Posts: 33
    Fidel wrote:
    Don't kid yourself. Once you get used to the egg and appreciate the way it cooks there is no way you will use a gasser for 90% of your cooks.

    That said, I would not build in a unit not intended for that purpose. You may end up with airflow, or worse, ventilation, issues that could results in improper performance or even damage to your kitchen.

    You misunderstood...I plan to use the Egg 90% of the time.
  • FidelFidel Posts: 10,168
    My apologies..I misunderstood.
  • MaineggMainegg Posts: 7,787
    Like has been said I would look at adding another egg down the road. you will be amazed at the food you can cook on that Egg. side burner yes :) but a gasser :( no I really would do another egg. spend a few weeks cooking and learning your egg before you jump the gun and then design your set up.
  • Vol JackVol Jack Posts: 33
    Ya'll may be right... I am not crazy aboout dropping $900+ for something I don't really plan on using a lot.
    I have a storage room not far from where my grilling area will be...I could store the old gas grill in there and wheel it out for the large family BBQ's and kids birthday parties.


    I am even thinking about trading in my Large Egg (that is still in the box) for an XL Egg.

    Any suggestions?
  • MaineggMainegg Posts: 7,787
    keep the large and add a small or a med or even another large then the eggcessories will mix and match. just to give you some idea.. I have 7 eggs :( sickness I know and they are split between two houses.. but still... LOL
  • DiDi Posts: 395
    Don't spend a lot of money on the gasser, you won't use it much (I speak from experience). Here's a picture of my outdoor kitchen. I spent way too much $$ on the gas grill.

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  • Vol JackVol Jack Posts: 33
    that is exactly ( or should I say eggxactly ) what I am looking to build....even the same size area....except I was gonna use a bunch of new brick that I have left over from another project.

    Is that a DCS brand grill?
    They are way up there on the Gas price list..$$$$
  • DiDi Posts: 395
    It is a DCS. Told you I spent way too much. It's a great gas grill, we just don't use it. We also opted to have the drop-in cooler instead of a frig. It just suited our needs more. When we entertain, we can ice down plenty of drinks for a large group and they stay cold for 2-3 days even in the Texas heat.
  • Uncle PhilUncle Phil Posts: 665
    I put my outdoor kitchen in 5 years ago. It has been one of the best investments we have made. I agree with another Eggers comments on spending money on the gasser. I have a beautiful Twin Eagles gas grill, that does a great job. I spent $3500 for it and I cook a quick hamburger on it and occasionally do a rotisserie chicken on it. Put in the gas grill, just don't go high end. The Naked Whiz has a wonderful segment on his site dedicated to outdoor kitchens. It is a great place to start. From a real estate perspective, the kitchen can add value to your home and if you ever go to sell the house could be the deciding factor between your home and the one down the block. My kitchen has all granite countertops, fridge, hot and cold running water, plenty of storage places and SS drawers. Plus hot and cold running water. Understand we cook out there every night and hardly turn on the stove in the house. Have fun. Do your research and visit here often to share your progress and ideas. There was one website that I visited a lot during the construction. I can't recall right now, but it you Google building Outdoor Kitchens, I bet you will find it. These guys were great and I saved money by learning from their mistakes.
    Uncle Phil

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  • WWSisWWSis Posts: 1,448
    I was hoping to have an outdoor kithen this year, but finances prevented it this year. I asked for advice too, and I think one of the best things about NOT being able to do anything, is that I have decided that I like and want my eggs mobile. If I do end up creating something more permanent I will not build the eggs in. I donated my expensive gas grill three weeks after getting my first egg - now I have three. Get another egg; I don't cook much volume, but one can cook ALOT of food on say, two larges with raised grids.
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  • RipnemRipnem Posts: 5,511
    Cook on your new large for a while before you do anything on that ODK. You'll kick yourself somethin fierce if spend 10 bucks on a gasser. Or take our word for it and build the space around a couple larges and a small. ;)

    You can cook a pile of food on a large/small combo.

    If it's speed your after, a weedburner will get it goin in a minute or so. :laugh:
  • NibbleMeThisNibbleMeThis Posts: 2,237
    I'm just now getting ready to demolish and rebuild my deck so these thoughts are on my mind. I have natural gas run to my deck and it hasn't been used since I got my Egg two plus years ago. I told the construction guys to remove it.

    Hoping I can save enough money to add a second Egg!
  • Had a gasser and didn't use it (not once) for two years after getting my Egg. Brought it back to the place where I bought it and they sold it for me for about 1/4 of what I paid for it.

    Use your Egg a while and then make a decision.
  • HAWKEYEGGHAWKEYEGG Posts: 20
    I have had my egg for almost a year. I have been laboring over a kitchen design. Definately use your egg for a while before designing a kitchen. I have changed my mind several times on the design. I have also debated on the egg itself after some less than desireable cooks. I am getting better and love the adventure of the cook, I guess my point is learn to use it and find out how you will use it and your design will benefit from it.
  • berrygoodberrygood Posts: 372
    From one Vol to another, double up on the eggs. We just finished our cooking area a few weeks ago and are pleased with the results.

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  • Jersey DougJersey Doug Posts: 458
    egg don't gas wrote:
    ... The side-burner on the other hand is a good idea, you can boil water for corn on the cob, pasta & so forth, so that will get used. ...
    I've been thinking the same thing. Any thoughts on what to use for a side burner?
  • ChappyChappy Posts: 198
    I'm going to go against the majority here. I would put a gas grill also. It has its place. I wouldn't go high end, but I would put one in. If you are ever planning on moving, most people would really want the gasser in your outdoor kitchen. I'm about to do the same thing and I will put a gasser in mine. Mainly for larger burger and dog cookouts. Also for putting a griddle on and using it for that. I know you can use the griddle on the eqq, but it is easier on the gasser.

    Thats my 2 cents. If you don't use it very much, big deal. But it will be there when you need it. Its only money!
  • Vol JackVol Jack Posts: 33
    berrygood wrote:
    From one Vol to another, double up on the eggs. We just finished our cooking area a few weeks ago and are pleased with the results.

    DSC_3818.jpg

    Nice setup Jeremy.

    I think I will save the $$ and not buy the gasser.
    I am trying to decide whether to add a 2nd egg..that can also serve as a mobile tailgating/camping egg.
  • Dimple's MomDimple's Mom Posts: 1,740
    Love your cooking area! I am wanting to do something outside but don't have the finances right now. However, I plan to do like you did and set the eggs on a platform but not into a cut-out hole. Those holes seem to me like they put the cooking surface of the egg too far away and I'd be leaning forward, which makes my back hurt just thinking about it. Plus they would be hard to remove from the holes if you needed to.
  • Dimple's MomDimple's Mom Posts: 1,740
    How did you integrate the roof over your outdoor kitchen with the roof over whatever your kitchen is attached to? I want to put something off the back of our garage. The easiest and cheapest would be to do some sort of trellis thing and put the 'kitchen' under that. But living in the PNW, that would mean drip drip drip a lot of the year. So I'm thinking we need some sort of covered roof. It's hard to figure out something attractive that will blend in with the garage roof.
  • I use my gasser every weekend as i always have allot of people over and the large egg doesnt have the cooking area that i need for multiple items (burgers, dogs, sausages, veggies, potatoes etc). Multiple eggs sounds great but i like to have a gasser also. Its just very easy to fire up a gasser to cook some something without having to wait 30-45 minutes for the egg to be ready to cook. Dont get me wrong I love my egg but i think having both makes sense especially if you plan on having large gatherings. just my 2cents.
  • AngelaAngela Posts: 461
    I second the other posts suggesting you cook on your new egg for awhile before starting your outdoor kitchen construction.
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 6,864
    Chappy wrote:
    If you are ever planning on moving, most people would really want the gasser in your outdoor kitchen.

    I'm about to do the same thing and I will put a gasser in mine. Mainly for larger burger and dog cookouts.

    Point 1, probably true. I had a hard time finding a neighbor to GIVE two 20 lb bags of Kingsford to! All of them use gassers!

    Point 2, I bought a gasser years ago, cooked two burgers on it and returned it the next day. Worst burgers I ever had. Definitely wouldn't have fed them to guests! :)
    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

    "Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screwtop jars. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don't deserve to eat garlic." Bourdain
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 6,864
    Chris, if it's doable, you might want to reconsider ripping out the gas line. As has been pointed out by others in this thread, MANY people prefer gas (go figure). When you sell the place, it would be nice to be able to say that there's a gas feed to the ODK. Just a thought...
    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

    "Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screwtop jars. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don't deserve to eat garlic." Bourdain
  • fire eggerfire egger Posts: 1,124
    Hey Jack
    I agree with some of the others that you should get to know your Egg before making a lot of decisions about your build, I am sure that the food quality will impress you.

    I built an ODK a couple of years ago, I included a gasser purely for resale, I am not leaving my egg's!!.
    in retrospect, I should have bought a cheaper gasser, I have not used it, other than occasionly as a warming oven.
    If you want the gasser purley for high volume cooks, my thoughts are to get a second Egg. I have two larges, and feed 15-20 people on a monthly bassis
    just my thoughts,
    enjoy your egg
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  • Vol JackVol Jack Posts: 33
    Another question.

    If I buy a twin egg instead of the gasser....how does the egg handle a bunch of greasy burgers?
    Is there a problem with flare ups and leaving a greasy mess for the next cook?
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