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2 anti-clumping additives questions

RRPRRP Posts: 15,261
edited 12:02PM in EggHead Forum
I make a homemade rub that we just love for prime rib like for on the 35 day Drybag aged one that is for supper tomorrow night. I make it in small batches, but there is always a goodly bit left over so I save it in a tightly sealed glass spice jar from Penzkys. Then when I make a new batch I mix in the leftover which always is just a tad clumpy by then. I have been thinking that maybe I should add some anti-clumping agent to prevent that. Would common corn starch work? OTOH since I assume the clumping comes from the presence of moisture would merely adding some dry white rice to the stored rub do the trick and not add any taste?
Ron
Dunlap, IL
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Comments

  • here is a natural one I found and its made from rice. I might would try rice wrapped in a single layer of cheesecloth.


    https://www.inventables.com/technologies/hypoallergenic-anti-caking-agent
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  • skyhopsingskyhopsing Posts: 107
    down here in FLO Rida we have a constant problem with humidity. You can always try putting some rice grains in you rub. I like to save the little packets of silicone that come in various products. Works great last long time.
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,261
    WOW - thanks...I asked what time it was and you built me a watch! Sounds like I can just add "Grandma's" time honored pieces of rice like she did for her salt.
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,261
    those things are safe around food? Guess I haven't read the warnings well enough. OTOH one particular HIGH PRICED med I take comes sealed and with a tiny canister of some "stuff" that I was thinking of using, but removing before shaking the rub.
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • Just make sure the desiccant packs are made from silica. Silica is what your hair and nails are made out of and is sold as a nutritional supplement in health food stores.
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,261
    LOL - I'm a retired bean counter with a very limited chemistry exposure in school back 52 years ago...I think I will stick with common rice! Let's see One two three four... :laugh:
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • Mike in AbitaMike in Abita Posts: 3,302
    Dry rice will do absolutely nothing to remove moisture. If that was the case you could soften rice by just setting it in a bowl, and allowing the humidity to do its thing. It will allow for a grinding agent to break up the clumps though.

    Not sure about the corn starch idea. Sounds plausible, wonder what it would do for appearance though.
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,261
    ???
    you've never heard of putting dry rice in a salt shaker to prevent clumping? I guess all those "Chinese" myths were tricks just to sell rice? :laugh:
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • Morro Bay RichMorro Bay Rich Posts: 2,227
    Apparently you have never been to North Caroling. All salt shakers there contain rice. No matter what restaurant you go to you hear salt shakers being banged on the table before being used to break up the caking that has taken place. We joke about it being the sound of North Carolina. :laugh:
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  • Mike in AbitaMike in Abita Posts: 3,302
    I've been to too many restaurants around here that try that trick and it just doesn't work. The worst is the packets of Sweet-n-Low. Once they get caked up it's like trying to mix cement into your tea.

    I guess it might have something to do with how much humidity we're talking about. On the gulf coast, all you get is rice grains clogging your salt shaker, once you clear the rice from the openings, then you get damp salt that clogs up the shaker.

    It might have a different effect on an enclosed bottle. Give it a shot, I'll be interested in hearing the results.
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  • Grandma ALWAYS had some rice in her salt shaker...I do to!
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