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Drippings

Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
edited 8:39AM in EggHead Forum
 
After watching several different Food Network shows I see Bobby Flay using the drippings from his Boston Butt Cooks (done indoors) and putting them back into the meat to add flavor and moisture.

Anyone using the drippings and if so how and what methods do you use to collect and then recapture the 'goodies'?

GG

Comments

  • Hi GG. Since I never had a platesetter til just a few months ago, I have always cooked my pork in a large aluminum pan, on the grate. I've been doing it like that for 10 years. That way, I catch the drippings the meat actually sits in, I strain the fat off of it, and pour it back over the pulled pork. Works well for me. I like the moisture it adds.

    CIMG2838.jpg

    I used the large heavy duty aluminum pan you use for a whole turkey and bend in the corners to fit the large egg.

    CIMG2840.jpg

    This cook produced alot of drippings as you can see on the edges of the pan.

    I am interested to know if anyone else does it this way. I would imagine most people catch the drippings in a drip pan sitting on the platesetter.

    Faith
    Tampa
    Happily egging on my original large BGE since 1996... now the owner of 6 eggs. Call me crazy, everyone eLse does!
     
    3 Large, 2 Smalls, 1 well-used Mini
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,750
    shhhhhsh....its a secret that a platesetter is not needed to do a low and slow. :laugh: dont tell anyone, but you only need thermal heat mass for higher temp fast cooks like breads and pizzas where you want and need quick temp recovery. only a very small group of us know this ;) never thought to put the butt in the pan though, my grid sits on the pan, never thought to use the drippings either
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,750
    never tried the drippings from a boston butt, but brisket in foil in the cooler the juice goes into a lite watery sauce and back into the sliced brisket at serving time. bet the same could be done with a butt, especially if it was wrapped after the plataue stage, but you might lose some crunch on the bark if you like that. florida grillin girls idea sounds interesting, never tried it because i thought it may be bitter, maybe next time
  • I found another picture of a different cook. This one had alot less drippings.

    P5070177.jpg

    The meat:

    P5080179.jpg

    Faith
    Tampa
    Happily egging on my original large BGE since 1996... now the owner of 6 eggs. Call me crazy, everyone eLse does!
     
    3 Large, 2 Smalls, 1 well-used Mini
  • Fishlessman, sshh!! I won't tell anyone else that you don't need a platesetter for this cook! The drippings have never tasted bitter, they always taste GOOD.

    Faith
    Tampa
    Happily egging on my original large BGE since 1996... now the owner of 6 eggs. Call me crazy, everyone eLse does!
     
    3 Large, 2 Smalls, 1 well-used Mini
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 21,750
    i think theres only three of us that know ;)
  • bigdtdbigdtd Posts: 32
    make that 4 of us!
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
     
    Thanks Faith, I do use the drippings when cooking in a Dutch Oven for gravy.

    In the last week I have seen both Bobby Flay and Alton Brown saying to add the drippings from a Butt to add flavor to the pulled pork. Both those shows were for indoor cooks. They also used liquid smoke which made me wonder.

    I got to wondering about adding flavor for chicken, pork and other cooks.

    I guess I need to make sure the drippings don't scorch and then remove the fat. More testing....

    Thanks, Kent
  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,773
    'nuff said..
  • GG, as you can see from my first pic, there was a lot of juice. In the next post, there wasn't much, the pan turned a dark brown, with a small amount of fat drippings. That cook was a bone in pork shoulder (picnic). I wonder if that had anything to do with it.

    Faith
    Tampa
    Happily egging on my original large BGE since 1996... now the owner of 6 eggs. Call me crazy, everyone eLse does!
     
    3 Large, 2 Smalls, 1 well-used Mini
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
     
    The only thing I have noticed with bone in and boneless is there are pockets of really good tasting meat close to the bone.

    Those pockets of goodies very seldom get past my testing to see if it tastes good step.

    In both the episodes there was water added to the drippings then the dump back into the pulled pork.

    I wanted to test the 'can you taste the coke' if adding it to make the pulled pork more moist.

    barbacoa1.jpg

    After a little reheating I really had to leave the pork in my mouth to get even a hint of the coke. If one was just eating it they would probably never know.

    I added some coke 12 oz to 6# plus a little chili powder. The taste was amazing. I really liked the additional moisture on the buns. That 'juice' seeps a little into the bun and makes a great sandwich.
    barbacoa2.jpg

    GG
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