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time between reloading

fishonfishon Posts: 24
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I am looking at getting an Egg and have a question. For long smokes such as for a brisket or Turkey. Will I need to reload the charcoal? And if so, how is that done without unloading everything? What is the longest a fully loaded fire box can product enough heat?
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Comments

  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,665
    I've gone 24 hours at 250 dome with a full load in a large and still had some leftover.
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,091
    fishon,

    The lump will last longer than whetever you cook on it. I have had thirty hours+

    Steve

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,665
    your getting slow old man :whistle: :laugh: ;)
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,659
    at 200 to 225 degrees dome, about 30 to 40 hours give or take with a full load. depends on the lump your using. check out the link to get an idea
    http://www.eggheadforum.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=507801&catid=1
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,091
    You don't use any words with more than two syllables, young feller

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,665
    cause I can't spell em :blush:
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  • fishonfishon Posts: 24
    WOW that's a lot longer than I anticipated. So no reloading required! I assume that is due to the ceramic construction and very little hit loss, so very little coal to replace the heat. Am I correct?
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  • FlaPoolmanFlaPoolman Posts: 11,665
    Yep
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    turkey cooks quick. 10 minutes a pound for some reason.

    a long cook is maybe 32 to 40 hours. you won't need to replenish the lump or the smoking wood. that's be a bunch of butss at maybe 225 or so. most long smokes will probably be a little hotter (250) and shorter (18 to 24 hours). but you can go 40+ if you really want to
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,399
    I've only once come close to needing to add more lump, and that was about 14 hours into a cook where I didn't fill the Egg. The Egg restricts the amount of charcoal burning to just what in necessary to produce the heat you want, and for lo-n-slo, that is almost nothing.
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  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,768
    I'll add to this party by saying Dave and I cooked 30 butts on 6 eggs and never reloaded a single cooker.

    Threw out a lot of good lump to be safe on the journey home.

    Something was definitely done wrong if you HAVE to reload.
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  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    I have a medium egg and have rarely had to reload the lump when doing long cooks for butts or briskets. Its more common for me to run out in the colder weather as it just takes more heat to keep things moving. For low and slow cooks I typically cook at about 240-260 on the dome and for the most part use Royal Oak lump. I make sure that the firebox is filled as full as I can get it, light 2-3 small spots on the lump and let the temp settle where I want to cook. I like to light 2-3 places in the lump to keep it from burning only the center of the lump pile and not the edges as well. I've never experienced a burn longer than 18-20 hours on my cooker at those temps. With the above process I am usually pretty close to the bottom of lump when the meat is done, but rarely do I run out. Biggest factors for me on how much I'll burn during a cook are outside temp and quantity of meat in the cooker.

    Hope this helps.

    Troy
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  • RascalRascal Posts: 3,349
    How about a clue as to what size BGE you're buyin'? That would helpa bunch! They go from "Mini" to "XL". Happy Cookin'~~!
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  • fishonfishon Posts: 24
    Looking at Large or XL.

    I've got a gas smoker vault with a water pan now and it's a pain to keep the right temp in the winter with some wind. So I'm looking around.
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  • fieroguyfieroguy Posts: 777
    Look no further than the BGE.

    Mike
    30833
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  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,399
    I've only encountered 2 problems using the Egg in winter. 1.) Forgot to cover it, and found it sealed in 1/2 shell of ice. 2.) Didn't want to shovel thru the snow drifts between the door and the Egg. Otherwise, no problems even with -17 F.
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  • -17, good god man. I am in San Dieggo, if it gets below 65 I whine like a little girl. I hate wearing pants and socks.
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