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first time menu

KcLeafKcLeaf Posts: 62
edited 9:37AM in EggHead Forum
Getting my medium egg this weekend. Been reading that i should start out at lower temps to break it in, before I do steaks. Don't want gasket problems.
SO have not read the book yet but what do you experienced eggers think I should start with, Spatchcock chicken, direct indirect, drip pan ,, ribs
Would appreciate advice, don't want to screw up. \
Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • EGCEGC Posts: 448
    It's tough to mess up a steak, unless you leave it on for too long. I think that was my first cook 10 years ago.... Mmmmm, steak.
  • KcLeafKcLeaf Posts: 62
    Actually that is what i want to do. but after reading some of the posts a little leary of starting out with a sear
  • KcLeafKcLeaf Posts: 62
    Actually that is what i want to do. but after reading some of the posts a little leary of starting out with a sear
  • EGCEGC Posts: 448
    If you have a bad gasket/bad glue or whatever in the h@ll the problem is with the eggs these days, I think you'll have it regardless of when you do a high temp cook. Also, if you're going to replace it, why not go ahead a get it over with while the egg is still clean to remove any cleaning time?

    Just my $0.02.
  • KcLeafKcLeaf Posts: 62
    Actually that is what i want to do. but after reading some of the posts a little leary of starting out with a sear
  • KcLeafKcLeaf Posts: 62
    Actually that is what i want to do. but after reading some of the posts a little leary of starting out with a sear
  • KcLeafKcLeaf Posts: 62
    sorry have not figured out how to post either B)
  • KcLeafKcLeaf Posts: 62
    sorry have not figured out how to post either B)
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
    . Read the manual
    . Watch the DVD
    . Read the forum (seems like you have done this)

    As time allows browse The Naked Whiz Site, Thirdeye's site and the others in the following in the following post http://www.eggheadforum.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=609888&catid=1

    My first cook, brats & hot dogs, chicken and then some steak (same load of lump), just had to try it all.

    When your lump is lit and you look at it, the red lava looking parts are somewhere close to 1100° - the dome can be anywhere from 200° to 750° or further.

    The dome does not have to nuclear just get the grid closer to the lump. Or cook the meat right on the lump. Yup, if there is a good amount of lava looking lump searing directly on the lump works great.

    GG
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
    The steak was seared directly on the lump.

    Fajita's
    Fajita.jpg

    GG
  • Cactus DougCactus Doug Posts: 341
    Chicken was my first cook. I usually tell people to try it early on because:
    1. Its inexpensive
    2. has a decent margin of error
    3. gives you a chance to practice temp control
    4. can be cooked well with many setups (direct, indirect, etc..)
    5. leftover chicken is goood.
    6. if all goes wrong it was just chicken.
    Good luck, dont sweat it, the cooks will only get better.
  • BobSBobS Posts: 2,485
    I am sure that people will jump all over this, but I do not think that there is any data to support the break-in theory for gaskets. I have never seen the mother ship talk about it and just because it works, does not mean that a lot of gaskets would have fallen off without it.

    The Naked Whiz says: "...ceramic cookers like Big Green Egg and Primo do not require a break-in. You can cook at any temperature you wish from the day you bring them home."

    Be sure your dome is aligned and tight all the way around, understand and guard against run-away temps and flashbacks and go for it. The worst thing that will happen is that you will have to replace your gasket and there is no reason you cannot cook most things, while you are waiting to get a new one.

    That said, there have been LOTS of wonderful steaks cooked at 400-450 F, so don't hold back on that account.

    Actually just cook something that you already have confidence in and see how much better it is on the Egg.
  • SlickSlick Posts: 382
    Can's get more forgiving than a chicken. You can cook it anywhere from 250-500 degrees dome and it still comes out juicy and flavorful. Try a little grilled romaine with whatever you cook. Split the head lengthwise, sprinkle a little olive oil, pinch of s&p, couple of minutes each side. Any dressing you want, but just a drizzle of balsamic is really good.

    Slick
  • Grandpas GrubGrandpas Grub Posts: 14,226
    Bob, good post. On the cure I agree with you completely.

    Now with that said... I can tell you this. With the old felt gaskets and the new (bad batch) felt gaskets.

    On the first cook if you take an egg to very high temperatures there is a very high percentage change the adhesive and or gasket will fail.

    Lower temperature cooks there is a very high percantage chance the adhesive and or felt will not fail.

    Not that I have contradicted myself... I put a new (old felt gasket). I did 40 cooks under 400° dome. The 41st cook I took the egg to high temperature and took the adhesive and gasket out - complete burnout.

    There is a bit of history to this one particular incident and I know why the gasket failure and can not blame it on the egg, adhesive or felt. It was more the way I was using the egg.

    Newer eggers should follow the suggestions in BobS's post.

    GG
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