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Fresh Ham

CharlieCharlie Posts: 29
edited 7:40PM in EggHead Forum
Have 9.2 fresh picknic ham, just put into brine yesterday. I want to serve at 6 pm monday. I have med. egg, oak& apple chunks are soaking.If I at 5am and cook at 225 will the ham be about 190deg at 530 pm. I am new at this and any sugestions would be very helpfull.

Comments

  • Charlie, If you are cooking at a grate temperature of 225ºF and are shooting for an internal temperature of 190ºF, you should figure at least two hours per pound and add at least another hour to that cooking time. This is the safe side for getting it done. The picnic might be done before then and if it is, you can wrap the meat in foil, place it in a dry cooler with some towels. This will keep the meat over the 140º danger zone temperature for at least four hours, providing you keep the cooler closed. So if I were you and wanted to eat that nine pound roast at 6:00 p.m. tomorrow evening, I would put it on the fire tonight by 11:00 p.m..[p]Lager,[p]JDB
  • JDB,
    Thank you for your help. It sound like with ham or any other type of meat, it takes 1 1/2 to to 2 hours per pound at 200 to 225 deg. does this sound correct?

  • Charlie, Pork shoulders, butts and picnics on the average, will take 1.5 to 2 hours per pound at a cooking temperature of 225ºF to where they are pullable. The internal temperature between 190ºF amd 205ºF is usually that temperature range for pulling. An internal temperature between 175ºF and 185ºF works good for slicing the shoulder meats. So this will reduce their cooking time, if you are planning on slicing the meat. FWIW, I prefer to cook picnics for pulling instead of slicing.[p]Hams, whether they be fresh or pre-cooked are best when they have reached an internal temperature of 160ºF to 170ºF. That finish temperature is best for slicing purposes. Because there is not near the fat or collagen to break down in the ham area of the pig like there is in the shoulder area, hams usually take about an hour per pound to reach this slicing temperature when you cook at 225ºF.[p]As for brisket, that is a whole different animal. Choice briskets seem to cook quicker than select. I guess that is due to the fat content. I have had choice briskets take as little as 45 minutes per pound and select briskets take up to 1.5 hours per pound. And I do most of my cooking at 225ºF, which is measured at grate level.[p]IMHO a cooking temperature of 200ºF measured at the grate level is too low of temperature for safe cooking for larger pieces of meat. This temperature keeps the larger pieces of meat in the danger zone between 40ºF and 140ºF (internal temperature) for too long.[p]So what time did that picnic go on? You aren't trying to cook in a blizzard are you?[p]Lager,[p]Juggy D Beerman

  • JDB,
    JUST TO LET YOU KNOW I DID START AT 6AM. BECAUSE OF THE HIGH WINDS WE HAD MONDAY IN GRAND RAPIDS MICH. I HAD A HARD TIME TO KEEP THE TEMP AT 225, IT KEPT GOING UP TO 250-275. THE HAM WAS 173 AT 4PM. I RAPED IT IN FOIL AND WAS ABLE TO GET TEMP DOWN TO 175 TILL DINNER TIME. THERE WAS A LOT OF JUICE AND A WOUNDERFUL FLAVOR. IT WAS SO GOOD THAT ALL THERE IS LEFT IS LESS THAN A POUND AND THE BONE FOR SOUP.[p]I WANT TO THANK YOU FOR YOUR HELP AND THE INFO ABOUT BRISKET. I HAVE PRINTED YOUR RESPONCE FOR HELP IN MY FUTURE GRILLING.[p]

  • Charlie, I hear you loud and clear. :-) [p]Just remember, those guidelines I posted are not written in stone. Each piece of meat is different. Those higher temps that your cooker reached probably helped you make your deadline. Nothing wrong with cooking at 250ºF. One thing to remember is that sugar will carmelize at a cooking temperature above that temperature.[p]Glad to hear you cooking experience was a success![p]Beers to you,[p]JDB - Juggy D Beerman
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