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new table

opodopod Posts: 41
edited 4:33PM in EggHead Forum
IMG_2290.jpg
just built my table from plans on naked whiz's site. went well. i'm not mechanically inclined but instructions were overall very good. Here's what I learned:
1. building the frame properly is THE KEY. all sides must be square and exactly match in height. if one side is off and you belt sand it, your planking will not match when you lay it.
2. initially make the legs a little long and of equal length. you can cut them down later to accommadate your wheels. equal lengths makes it level while you're working on it which is nice.
3. USE A COUNTER SINK. I did not and split several cut pieces of wood.
4. I put the whole thing together, labeled pieces, then took it apart and stained/varnished it. i then put stained/varnished pieces together again which went pretty well.
5. i followed directions but my smoker opening on top did not match the granite i have on the bottom. i had to adjust accordingly and fortunately had enough wiggle room in the top to properly align it.
kurt kowalski

Comments

  • JeetJeet Posts: 43
    I have to say I am absolutely impressed!
  • c tredwellc tredwell Posts: 575
    Hey Kurt,
    great looking table! One suggestion...scribe your top piece of granite and use a router to take out enough wood to inset your cutting board. would look very clean. if you do that, drill a finger hole in the bottom of the inset to pop the granite out for easy cleaning!
    Just a thought.... :whistle:
    ctredwell
    go dawgs
  • porcheggporchegg Posts: 47
    Nice looking table. Good job and thanks for the tips. That's a project on my list.
  • skihornskihorn Posts: 600
    That looks very nice!

    "not mechanically inclined"???

    I am not sure how you would describe me. When I change a light bulb I tell my wife I just did a minor home repair. If I have to use a ladder, then it is a major home repair. :)
  • tjvtjv Posts: 3,358
    dang that is one glossy table.....I can see myself getting another beer.....LOL. T
    www.ceramicgrillstore.com ACGP, Inc.
  • metryleemetrylee Posts: 94
    you did a good job
    i need to do that also
  • opodopod Posts: 41
    sorry for the ignorance, but what is "scribe?" I left the cutting board a little proud intentionally so i can lay hot stuff on it that may be a little wider than the granite without burning the table. Maybe if I had the edges of the granite polished it would look a little nicer--but it would be a bit more expensive, and it's amazing how all the little things keep running up the costs. keep the suggestions coming--i'm all ears!!
  • BHE1BHE1 Posts: 205
    OPOD, First the table looks great. I just printed the directions from the same website. I hope you don't mind me asking but what was the final cost for materials. At this point, I'm wondering if there is a significant cost savings by making the table myself?
  • Big'unBig'un Posts: 5,909
    It looks great! You did good job and should be proud. Now get cookin'!
  • Looks great! If what you say is true about your skills, you did a great job.

    On a side note about your table, look on the Whiz site about the base you are using. A few folks have had some issues with that.

    I have seen many post "disappear" about that issue, so that is all i will say.
  • BacchusBacchus Posts: 6,019
    I would say that you ARE mechanically inclined. Nice Table.
  • opodopod Posts: 41
    if you're referring to the wheels set-up, i used the 10" "no flat" wheels on a 5/8" threaded rod that is the recommended "fix" for the previous wheel problems people were having with flattening. i'll find out soon enough if it is a problem. Plan B is to remove the wheels and put that side on 1" blocks if i need to.
    Total cost was probably $300-$350. Toss up to build vs buy vs hire somebody to do it for you. There is some value in the satisfaction of doing it yourself though and if i can do it 99% of you can as well. I will say the staining/varnishing took about twice as long as actually constructing the table.
    One additonal consideration for those considering making one would be to double up the 2x4's for the legs. it would not change the blueprint plans and would make the legs much stronger. it just seems like a lot of weight on those legs but again, i'm not a home builder so i don't know how much weight 2x4's usually hold.
  • JeffersonianJeffersonian Posts: 4,244
    I think he's talking about what your Egg is sitting on. Some Eggers here have issues with thinner (< 1") bases cracking, sometimes explosively. You might consider putting a paver or two under the Egg instead. Not quite as pretty, but more durable:

    DSC01094.jpg
  • ric3677ric3677 Posts: 278
    You took the words right out of my mouth Brad.

    Rick
  • SKIPSKIP Posts: 1
    Where can I find the plans for a table like this? It looks really great!
  • JeffersonianJeffersonian Posts: 4,244
    You can find plans for a Large or Small at - where else? - The Naked Whiz's Site
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