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Pizza Dough mixing question

HungryManHungryMan Posts: 3,470
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
With a kitchen aid mixer, with a dough hook, how long do you mix it?

Comments

  • RascalRascal Posts: 3,347
    HungryMan, Bread dough is ready when it starts to climb up the hook and forms a lump, or ball. Not sure if you want to go quite that far with pizza dough as you still want to be able to roll or work it out thin. It's probably more of a thing you have to eyeball rather than relying strictly on time.[p]Rascal

  • egretegret Posts: 3,998
    HungryMan,
    Same way as with bread.......till dough has started cleaning the sides of the bowl and is no longer sticky.

    image
  • HungryManHungryMan Posts: 3,470
    egret,
    Thanks,
    I will let the games begin.

  • HungryMan,[p]According to Alton Brown. 15 minutes[p]Recipe courtesy Alton Brown
    Show: Good Eats
    Episode: Flat is Beautiful





    2 tablespoons sugar
    1 tablespoon kosher salt*
    1 tablespoon pure olive oil
    3/4 cup warm water
    2 cups bread flour (for bread machines)
    1 teaspoon instant yeast
    2 teaspoons olive oil
    Olive oil, for the pizza crust
    Flour, for dusting the pizza peel
    Toppings:
    1 1/2 ounces pizza sauce
    1/2 teaspoon each chopped fresh herbs such as thyme, oregano, red pepper flakes, for example
    A combination of 3 grated cheeses such as mozzarella, Monterey Jack, and provolone[p]Place the sugar, salt, olive oil, water, 1 cup of flour, yeast, and remaining cup of flour into a standing mixer's work bowl.
    Using the paddle attachment, start the mixer on low and mix until the dough just comes together, forming a ball. Lube the
    hook attachment with cooking spray. Attach the hook to the mixer and knead for 15 minutes on medium speed.
    Tear off a small piece of dough and flatten into a disc. Stretch the dough until thin. Hold it up to the light and look to
    see if the baker's windowpane, or taut membrane, has formed. If the dough tears before it forms, knead the dough for an
    additional 5 to 10 minutes.
    Roll the pizza dough into a smooth ball on the countertop. Place into a stainless steel or glass bowl. Add 2 teaspoons of
    olive oil to the bowl and toss to coat. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 18 to 24 hours.
    Place the pizza stone or tile onto the bottom of a cold oven and turn the oven to its highest temperature, about 500 degrees F.
    If the oven has coils on the oven floor, place the tile onto the lowest rack of the oven. Split the pizza dough into 2 equal
    parts using a knife or a dough scraper. Flatten into a disk onto the countertop and then fold the dough into a ball.
    Wet hands barely with water and rub them onto the countertop to dampen the surface. Roll the dough on the surface until it tightens.
    Cover one ball with a tea towel and rest for 30 minutes.
    Repeat the steps with the other piece of dough. If not baking the remaining pizza immediately, spray the inside of a ziptop
    bag with cooking spray and place the dough ball into the bag. Refrigerate for up to 6 days.
    Sprinkle the flour onto the peel and place the dough onto the peel. Using your hands, form a lip around the edges of the pizza.
    Stretch the dough into a round disc, rotating after each stretch. Toss the dough in the air if you dare. Shake the pizza on
    the peel to be sure that it will slide onto the pizza stone or tile. (Dress and bake the pizza immediately for a crisp crust
    or rest the dough for 30 minutes if you want a chewy texture.)
    Brush the rim of the pizza with olive oil. Spread the pizza sauce evenly onto the pizza. Sprinkle the herbs onto the pizza and
    top with the cheese.
    Slide the pizza onto the tile and bake for 7 minutes, or until bubbly and golden brown. Rest for 3 minutes before slicing.
    *This recipe's been on the web for some time now and although most of the reactions have been darned positive, some of you have
    commented that the dough was way too salty. At first we chalked this up to personal preference; some folks are just not as
    sensitive as others to this basic flavor. And of course salty toppings would definitley change the dynamic. Still, we didn't
    want to leave it at that. We went back to the lab and found that the flake size of kosher salt differs quite a bit from
    brand to brand. This could easily result in a too salty crust. So unless you've had success with the recipe in the past, we suggest
    you cut the salt by one teaspoon, from a tablespoon to two teaspoons. So that the yeast doesn't go crazy, you should also cut back
    on the sugar by half a teaspoon. Thanks, AB

  • BENTEBENTE Posts: 8,337
    HungryMan,
    since pizza dough and bread are so simaliar you have to knead the dough until you can "window pane" it [p]Here is something i copied from food network:Using the dough hook attachment, knead the mixture on low for 2 to 3 minutes just until it comes together. Cover the dough in the bowl with a kitchen towel and allow to rest for 20 minutes. After 20 minutes, knead the dough on medium speed for 5 to 10 minutes or until you are able to gently pull the dough into a thin sheet that light will pass through. The dough will be sticky, but not so sticky that you can't handle it. [p][p]HTH[p][p]happy eggin
    tb

    happy eggin

    TB

    Anderson S.C.

    "Life is too short to be diplomatic. A man's friends shouldn't mind what he does or says- and those who are not his friends, well, the hell with them. They don't count."

    Tyrus Raymond Cobb

  • QBHQBH Posts: 45
    HungryMan,[p]Nowadays, I uses a food processor, but I used to use the dough hook on the kitchenaid. I let it bang around on low speed for a couple of minutes after the dough has tuned into a ball. I found it made less bubbles in the dough when I did that. Just my two cents.
  • RobbqRobbq Posts: 11
    EdF wrote:
    ... about pizza making: http://www.pizzamaking.com

    I agree this is a great site for pizza, my pizzas have been much better since visiting this site. What I will usually do is once the ball forms is let the mixer kneed for another 4-5 minutes. Then weigh out the dough balls, and refrigerate for 3 day or so. here is my recipe for NY style for those that are intersted it will make 3 12" pizzas. (Courtesy of the good folks at pizzamaking.com and the 'lehman calculator')

    Flour (100%): 613.72 g | 21.65 oz | 1.35 lbs

    Water (60%): 368.23 g | 12.99 oz | 0.81 lbs

    IDY (.247%): 1.52 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp

    Salt (1.76%): 10.8 g | 0.38 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.25 tsp | 0.75 tbsp

    Oil (1.1%): 6.75 g | 0.24 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.5 tsp | 0.5 tbsp

    Sugar (Honey) (1.46%): 8.96 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.25 tsp | 0.75 tbsp

    Total (164.567%): 1009.99 g | 35.63 oz | 2.23 lbs | TF = 0.105

    Single Ball: 336.66 g | 11.88 oz | 0.74 lbs

    1.In a mixing bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, add the salt and honey to the water and stir or whisk until the salt and honey is dissolved.

    2.Combine the flour and yeast (IDY) and gradually add to the mixing bowl, at "Stir" or low speed. If necessary, use a spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl so that the flour is directed into the path of the dough hook and forms a rough dough ball.

    3. When the bulk of the flour has been taken up into the dough ball, about 2 minutes, add the oil and continue to knead, at low speed, for about another 2 minutes. Increase the mixer speed to medium and continue kneading for an additional 5-6 minutes. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and examine it. It should be smooth, soft and elastic without any tears on the outer surface. It should also be tacky rather than wet or dry. If these conditions are not met, return the dough to the mixer bowl and adjust by adding a bit more water or flour, as appropriate, and knead for about a minute more, or until the dough achieves the desired characteristics. (You will get better with this set of procedures with experience, so don't be afraid to stop the mixer to reorient the dough if it rides high on the hook or to otherwise play around with the dough to help it along. Most home mixers are not the most effective kneading machines.)

    4. When the dough is ready, remove it from the bowl and knead by hand for about 30 seconds to shape the dough into a smooth round ball. Divide the dough into 3 equal parts, the dough balls should weigh about 12 oz. and have an internal temperature of 80-85 degrees F (which is considered optimum for dough fermentation). Wipe the dough ball with a small amount of oil and place in a bowl or other suitable container. (You can use a bowl, a metal container or even a plastic storage bag or empty bread bag)

    5. Cover the dough container and place in the refrigerator, preferably for a period of 24-48 hours. If the dough is to be used beyond 48 hours, it is advisable to add a small amount of sugar (about 1/2 t.) to the water of the recipe at the same time the salt is added. This will help feed the yeast to extend the dough's useful life.

    6. When the dough is to be used, remove it from the refrigerator, place it on a work surface, lightly dust with a bit of bench flour, and cover with a sheet of plastic wrap. Let the dough warm up at room temperature for about 1 to 2 hours, or until the dough achieves an internal temperature of around 60-65 degrees F. (The dough will reach the desired temperature faster in the summer than in the winter.)

    7. About an hour before making the pizza, place the pizza stone (or tiles) on the lowest oven rack position and preheat to 500-550 degrees F for at least one hour.

    8. Shape the dough into a 12-inch round and place on a pizza peel lightly dusted with flour, corn meal or semolina. (Alternatively, the dough round can be placed on a well-seasoned 12-inch or larger pizza screen.)

    9. Dress the pizza round with pizza sauce, cheeses (sliced or shredded) and any other desired toppings (but remember that too many toppings will alter the bake time and the top and bottom of the pizza may not finish baking at the same time).

    10. Bake the pizza for about 5-6 minutes, or until the crust is nicely browned and the cheeses are bubbling. Remove from the oven and let cool for a few minutes before slicing and serving
  • RobbqRobbq Posts: 11
    HungryMan,[p]Put this over on the new site but...[p]What I will usually do is once the ball forms is let the mixer kneed for another 4-5 minutes. Then weigh out the dough balls, and refrigerate for 3 day or so. here is my recipe for NY style for those that are intersted it will make 3 12" pizzas. (Courtesy of the good folks at pizzamaking.com and the 'lehman calculator') [p]Flour (100%): 613.72 g | 21.65 oz | 1.35 lbs [p]Water (60%): 368.23 g | 12.99 oz | 0.81 lbs [p]IDY (.247%): 1.52 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.5 tsp | 0.17 tbsp [p]Salt (1.76%): 10.8 g | 0.38 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.25 tsp | 0.75 tbsp [p]Oil (1.1%): 6.75 g | 0.24 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.5 tsp | 0.5 tbsp [p]Sugar (Honey) (1.46%): 8.96 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.25 tsp | 0.75 tbsp [p]Total (164.567%): 1009.99 g | 35.63 oz | 2.23 lbs | TF = 0.105 [p]Single Ball: 336.66 g | 11.88 oz | 0.74 lbs [p]1.In a mixing bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook, add the salt and honey to the water and stir or whisk until the salt and honey is dissolved. [p]2.Combine the flour and yeast (IDY) and gradually add to the mixing bowl, at "Stir" or low speed. If necessary, use a spatula to scrape down the sides of the bowl so that the flour is directed into the path of the dough hook and forms a rough dough ball. [p]3. When the bulk of the flour has been taken up into the dough ball, about 2 minutes, add the oil and continue to knead, at low speed, for about another 2 minutes. Increase the mixer speed to medium and continue kneading for an additional 5-6 minutes. Remove the dough from the mixing bowl and examine it. It should be smooth, soft and elastic without any tears on the outer surface. It should also be tacky rather than wet or dry. If these conditions are not met, return the dough to the mixer bowl and adjust by adding a bit more water or flour, as appropriate, and knead for about a minute more, or until the dough achieves the desired characteristics. (You will get better with this set of procedures with experience, so don't be afraid to stop the mixer to reorient the dough if it rides high on the hook or to otherwise play around with the dough to help it along. Most home mixers are not the most effective kneading machines.) [p]4. When the dough is ready, remove it from the bowl and knead by hand for about 30 seconds to shape the dough into a smooth round ball. Divide the dough into 3 equal parts, the dough balls should weigh about 12 oz. and have an internal temperature of 80-85 degrees F (which is considered optimum for dough fermentation). Wipe the dough ball with a small amount of oil and place in a bowl or other suitable container. (You can use a bowl, a metal container or even a plastic storage bag or empty bread bag) [p]5. Cover the dough container and place in the refrigerator, preferably for a period of 24-48 hours. If the dough is to be used beyond 48 hours, it is advisable to add a small amount of sugar (about 1/2 t.) to the water of the recipe at the same time the salt is added. This will help feed the yeast to extend the dough's useful life. [p]6. When the dough is to be used, remove it from the refrigerator, place it on a work surface, lightly dust with a bit of bench flour, and cover with a sheet of plastic wrap. Let the dough warm up at room temperature for about 1 to 2 hours, or until the dough achieves an internal temperature of around 60-65 degrees F. (The dough will reach the desired temperature faster in the summer than in the winter.) [p]7. About an hour before making the pizza, place the pizza stone (or tiles) on the lowest oven rack position and preheat to 500-550 degrees F for at least one hour. [p]8. Shape the dough into a 12-inch round and place on a pizza peel lightly dusted with flour, corn meal or semolina. (Alternatively, the dough round can be placed on a well-seasoned 12-inch or larger pizza screen.) [p]9. Dress the pizza round with pizza sauce, cheeses (sliced or shredded) and any other desired toppings (but remember that too many toppings will alter the bake time and the top and bottom of the pizza may not finish baking at the same time). [p]10. Bake the pizza for about 5-6 minutes, or until the crust is nicely browned and the cheeses are bubbling. Remove from the oven and let cool for a few minutes before slicing and serving

  • How much yeast if I'm using regular dry and not instant?
    Thanks for the recipe! I much prefer recipes with weights versus measurements.

    I agree that one of the 'tricks' to good pizza dough is making at least 24 hours in advance or longer. Sooooo much easier to stretch into a pizza!

    Gwen
  • How much yeast if I'm using regular dry and not instant?
    Thanks for the recipe! I much prefer recipes with weights versus measurements.

    I agree that one of the 'tricks' to good pizza dough is making at least 24 hours in advance or longer. Sooooo much easier to stretch into a pizza!

    Gwen
  • HungryManHungryMan Posts: 3,470
    robbq,
    I looked at that site and got ideas. The measurements are to exact for me. Or should I say to complicated!

  • RobbqRobbq Posts: 11
    HungryMan,[p]I thought so too at first, then I bought a $20 scale and I'll never go back to pizza the old way again. Pizza making is like eggin' it can be very addicting.
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