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Lets revisit the Brisket question..

GWWGWW Posts: 43
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I always see posts about beef briskets but never really took an interest until a couple of weeks ago, when I threw a 7lb on the big green devil and waited it out. First I marinated / rubbed it down overnight, cooked it at a rock steady 220* for 9-10 hours to internal temp of 183*, smelled and looked great, sliced it up nice and thin and began to gooble. Very tender, very tasty, but a little on the dry side,not to bad just enough to piss me off! Now the questions began, way back I read a post about briskets and how they go through a dry period and some how like magic the moisture finds it's way back into the meat, WHAT? does this really happen? if so when and at what internal temp should it be cooked? I Must Tame the Brisket![p]Greg

Comments

  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    GWW,[p]You didnt mention whether you cooked the brisket direct or indirect. If its direct, that may be the reason for the dryness. I usually cook my briskets indirect for over 20 hours (depending on size) and they come out just as tender and juicy as you can imagine. The first one I ever did I cooked direct and it was dry as a shingle after about 12 hours. Some people cook briskets direct, not sure how. Not too sure about the dry meat turning moist again, have not heard that at all. Good luck with the next brisket, its a real treat. Just FYI on that dry brisket. Put it in a crock pot with some Q sauce and heat it up for awhile, good as new and mighty tasty.[p]Troy
  • GWWGWW Posts: 43
    Oh yea, cooked it indirect. Crock pot is a good idea for the dry ones, but I must perfect this cook. Think this is where my obsession takes over!
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,295
    GWW,
    How was the fat cap coverage?? Every brisket is a bit different, but a fat layer is important to provide basting and to reduce moisture loss. 9-10 hours sounds a bit short for the cooking temps you describe. Like Sprinter mentioned, if you did it direct, it would definitely explain some of the dryness...as well as your short cooking time.[p]I have had briskets that were done at 185 internal, but they cooked much longer than you described. The fork twist method of checking doneness really works.[p]BTW, I am about ready to finally make that charcoal run to Landover! We should touch base.
    Cheers! Your next chunk-o-chest will be perfect.
    NB[p]

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    GWW,[p]Something here just isnt adding up. You say that you cooked:[p]1 - 7LB Brisket
    2 - 9 Hours
    3 - 220 Degrees dome temp the whole time
    4 - 183? internal temp[p]The way I cook brisket, indirect around 200-225, that brisket would have taken me about 15-18 hours to reach that internal temp.[p]Are you sure of the dome temp? Did the brisket seem burned or just dried out? Just a guess but was the tip of the dome thermometer possibly stuck into the brisket and you may have been cooking it at a much higher temp than you thought?[p]I cant make sense out of it, maybe others can help, not sure why the brisket seemed to be dry (I'm assuming you mean overcooked also). Those numbers, times, and temps just dont add up to me.[p]Maybe give us some more specific detail to the setup of the egg, the indirect setup you use etc. Hopefully someone will be able to give more specific advice to you, right now I'm drawing a blank.[p]Troy

  • JimWJimW Posts: 450
    sprinter,
    Leftover brisket, if there is such a thing, makes some damn fine chili too.
    JimW

  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    JimW,[p]I'm a real fan of brisket and pulled pork omelettes in the AM. Mix in a little bit of meat with some veggies and a little hot sauce, saute it for a few minutes, throw in a few eggs and some cheese, and you're set for the day. That chili idea is a winner too, thanks for the heads up on that one.[p]Now that I think of it a bit, its difficult to think of something that leftover brisket would NOT go with.[p]Troy
  • flajokerflajoker Posts: 52
    GWW, I cooked a 5pd. briskett Sunday at 200 degrees. It cooked for almost 10 hrs. internal temp was 203. When you cut it, it's falling apart. Might be a little dry but q sauce takes care of that. I eat mine without sauce and it just so dang good I didn't notice if it is to dry. It was fat cap up and indirect. Maybe ya just got a bad briskett. Just thought I would share.[p]
  • WessBWessB Posts: 6,937
    Nature Boy,
    Let me know some of the details on the charcoal deal....got MAJOR boat problems right now ..but hate to miss a good opportunity..can do it in an E mail if you prefer[p]Wess

  • drbbqdrbbq Posts: 1,152
    GWW,
    I've been doing some recieving around here lately so I'll try to give a little too. I cook whole briskets without trimming much fat. I cook them to 190 and then wrap them in film and foil and them rest them in an empty prewarmed cooler for at least an hour but up to 5-6 hours. I feel the resting really serves the briskets well. Here's the scientific concept. Meat begins to break down at 160 but begins to seriously lose moisture above 180 so the trick is to keep it in between 160 and 180 for an extended period of time. I figure my method gets me a bunch of time in that zone on the way up and a bunch more on the way down, and on the way down it has no fire drying it out. I don't feel it hurts the bark much at all. Crunchy bark and tender, moist brisket just don't go together. I sure didn't invent this technique, I'm just passing it down.

    Ray Lampe
    Dr. BBQ
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    DRBBQ, your time of 160 to 180 is usually the stall period normally found and sometimes extending for quite some time. 3 to 4 hours, and once in a while even a dip will be noted just before the run up to 190 and above.
    C~W

  • drbbqdrbbq Posts: 1,152
    Char-Woody,
    True, but if you keep it in that zone, eventually the heat will dry out the outside which is at a higher temp than the inside. That's why I like the resting in that zone on the way down. It's sure not the only way to cook a good brisket. I'll be in Altoona June 29-30, you coming to see me?

    Ray Lampe
    Dr. BBQ
  • GWWGWW Posts: 43
    Alrighty, I use a BGE grill extender suspended on the low side with a drip pan for my indirect cooks. Now after discovering that there are times when the dome temp and the actual temp on the grate level varies up to 40* lower, I started using on some good advice by another obsessed egger a probe stuck thru a potato or onion placed on the grill next to the meat to get a actual temp on the cooking level. So maybe this is a mistake? since the dome temp tends to run higher. The fat cap? The fat cap? WHAT...well this brisket rookie thought is was a butt and trimmed it back just a bit, so guess that was a bad thing! So we will do some tweaking and get ready for round 2! Oh, yea Nature Boy my lump is running low so let me know thought on the lump run![p]Greg
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    drbbq:[p]Thanks for your insight . . .[p]Have you done your demo? How did it go and what do you think? Did you wear your protector?

  • drbbqdrbbq Posts: 1,152
    djm5x9,
    The first one will be Tuesday, hopefully more will follow. I'll be sure to let you know. I'm not biting right now.

    Ray Lampe
    Dr. BBQ
  • BUCKSPERTBUCKSPERT Posts: 10
    GWW,
    After the first World BGE championships I'll release my brisket receipe.

  • CaptainBBQCaptainBBQ Posts: 29
    GWW,[p]The most moist and tender brisket I have ever had was the one I recently cooked. Previously, I had also struggled with getting them to come out "just right". Anthony Up North posted a writing January 31, 2001 called "Theory of Brisket". The theory states that the brisket will be moist and tender and as it approaches 200* it will dry out again. As it gets to 205 to 210* it will again become moist and tender. I tried it and man it was the best I've had.[p]If you are interested send me an e-mail and I will give you more details. Or, you may be able to find his post in the archives.[p]CaptainBBQ
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    drbbq, Dang right...I will try and make it!! Anything you need besides beer? I am only a size 42 waist...so I will be a standout in that crowd..:-)
    C~W[p]

  • drbbqdrbbq Posts: 1,152
    Char-Woody,
    I'm not sure I can fatten you up in a day but I'll try. We'll be at the campground by the casino and amusement park. I'll be there all day Friday, ask somebody where the Bonesmokers are.

    Ray Lampe
    Dr. BBQ
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    drbbq, Ok...sounds great...! Do you carry a portable laptop?[p]
  • drbbqdrbbq Posts: 1,152
    Char-Woody,
    No, but it's high on my list.

    Ray Lampe
    Dr. BBQ
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    drbbq, I guess you e.mail me first.. I cannot find yours.
    Cya Friday or Sat..whats the best day for the best food and whats cookin??
    C~W[p]

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