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Reverse sear

HungryManHungryMan Posts: 3,470
edited 8:44PM in EggHead Forum
I once read somewhere about searing a steak after you cook it to temp. Will this work or defeat the purpose?
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Comments

  • Always, always, always....sear a steak first and then cook it to temp. I've read that too several times and had to bite my tongue!!! I've also read recently where a guy would put his steaks in a ziplock and then throw the package into hot water for a few minutes to bring it to temp...and then sear it on the BBQ...just plain gross IMHO...

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  • HungryMan,
    Alton Brown recommends doing this on some of the cheaper cuts of meat like sirloin in his episode "Raising The Steaks". To paraphrase AB:
    <blockquote>He uses a military metaphor for explaining why this method works best with Top Sirloin. Basically, if you use a sear-only method (using every division at your disposal), you'll end up with a beautiful outer crust, but the heat (thermal troops) will push on into the heart of the meat yielding a medium-well result in a piece of meat that cries out for medium-rareness. If you use a sear followed by a cooler cook (allow your thermal troops to retreat), so much cellular damage is done, the steak may lose too many fluids to survive. [p]But if you use a cool cook followed by a sear (sneak up on the steak with a few well-chosen commandos), you gently raise the interior temperature without doing much damage to the structure of the meat. Then when the center of the meat is within striking distance of medium-rare, you increase the heat, pushing in every bit of thermal energy you possibly got until the steak wishes it had never.....</blockquote>
    TNW

    The Naked Whiz
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  • HungryManHungryMan Posts: 3,470
    Rob in Bathurst, NB,
    Just wanted to check. Didnt make much sense.

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  • Where are the fluids going to go in a properly seared steak??? That's the idea...sear the surfaces to prevent moisture loss...like cauterizing a wound!!!

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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    Rob in Bathurst, NB,
    searing doesn't 'lock in juices"[p]that's a myth that keeps getting perpetuated.[p]in fact, searing causes more cell damge to the meat and causes MORE juices to be given up than if it were slowly brought up to desired temps at lower heat.[p]but searing gives you crust, and the loss of juice is negligible. (alton runs thru this on another show aboutfood myths). [p]overcooking is what fors a job on juice loss.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • Rob in Bathurst, NB,
    Well, AB only recommends this for cheaper cuts like sirloin, but the "searing seals in juices" myth has been pretty well debunked now. AB did a demo on his show disproving it, and I think that Harold McGee also says it isn't true in "On Food and Cooking". Searing is done solely for the Maillard reaction to produce flavor, not seal in juices.[p]TNW

    The Naked Whiz
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    Rob in Bathurst, NB,
    what's groos about it?
    if you warm your steak to "room temp" then a ziploc of hot water raises it to about 100.[p]when you cook a cold steak to temp, you have more "over done" on the exterior before you hit your target temp internally.[p]if you have a warm steak, say 100, then searing gives you mostly just sear on the very exterior, while the interior only needs to go thirty more degrees. much more "medium rare" when i do hot tub steaks than straight sear on a cold (or even room temp) steak.[p]a big bonus of a sear and dwell and then back on to cook is that the rest raises the internal temp.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    HungryMan,
    ...you might want to try it.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • I have been taking to slow cooking my tenderloin indirect over the plate setter at about 300 degrees dome temperature. It is on there upwards of 40 minutes, and it is a beautiful thing. I have never read anyone else doing it this way, but I have been to Argentina and I see how long they let cuts cook. The steak turns out medium rare all the way through (no grey on the outside, blue in the middle) with a nice slowly formed crust on the outside. I don't know if it's the egg, or what, but I have never done a better steak. It turns out so juicy I can't believe it. I've done this four times in a row now, so I don't think it was a fluke. Next time I do it, I'll post pictures. Anyone else have an opinion on the method?
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  • I reverse sear tri tips and they come out amazing.
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  • Clay QClay Q Posts: 4,418
    all over the map,
    I slow roast indirect most of the time, your not the only one. I'm about to put on a black pepper sauce + teriyaki sauce marinaded whole tenderloin at 300 dome, indirect with a wisp of hickory smoke. Thinking Chinese New Year flavors.
    Yup, it's the egg that makes a better steak.
    Clay

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  • Cook meat in a plastic bag??? Not in my lifetime if I can help it...yuk...

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  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,339
    HungryMan,
    I think a reverse sear is a great thing to have up your sleeve. For me, if I want a little more smoke flavor in my meat, or I am doing a large roast and want a more even color and doneness (along with a little more smoke flavor), then I will do a reverse sear. Gives you the same seared flavor on the outside either way.[p]You mention "defeating the purpose"...what's the purpose of a sear??[p]Beers!
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    Rob in Bathurst, NB,
    sheesh.[p]it's not cooked in a bag.[p]i find i like to actually read, understand, then try something before actually forming an opinion. but whatever works for you.[p]

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • Thanks ClayQ, [p]I was worried I was going crazy!
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  • HungryMan,[p]Not sure what you mean by "defeat the purpose" but I wouldn't get the steak up to temp. then sear as now your meat will be too well done. I don't reverse sear but others may tell you when to start. If you wanted a final temp. of 135 when do you start searing?[p]Howard
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  • HungryManHungryMan Posts: 3,470
    Nature Boy,
    I was thought you seared to lock in the juices.

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  • hungryMan,[p]I think that is considered to be an untruth. I think searing simply adds a great deal of taste as it's charring the outside and carmelizing it too.[p]Howard

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  • EdEd Posts: 123
    HungryMan,[p]Don't understand cooking, then searing. How do you time it? Searing then cooking is easy. First sear and as long as it's not a scrawny half inch thick (and now you've overcooked it) you bring your egg temp down to under 400F, stick a probe in the meat and cook to desired doneness, i.e. 125F for rare. If you do the reverse, where's the control? How do you prevent it from being overdone? You can't probe it because your probe will be toast at searing temps.[p]Love the sear, then cook at lower temp method because I can tell exactly when to pull that steak to perfect doneness.
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  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,339
    hungryMan,
    I am of the thinking that searing is for flavor. It's actually wild how many good cooks still adhere to the thought that somehow the searing actually holds in moisture. It's written a bunch too. I bet if you google "sear meat lock in juices" you'll get a bunch of hits. Seems like applying massive amounts of heat might actually cause the reverse. Maybe it does seal some moisture in. I have not done any side by side analysis or nuthin. But I have done me some reverse sears, and if you don't overcook the meat, and you rest it, it is gonna be moist no matta you seared it or not...or at the beginning or at the end. Then again, I am still learnin every day. So try the reverse sear. And see what you think!
    Beers
    Chris

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
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  • Bobby-QBobby-Q Posts: 1,993
    stike,
    Uh Oh I'm having to agree with you....[p]Worlds are colliding!!!

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  • Bobby-QBobby-Q Posts: 1,993
    The Naked Whiz,
    Well put!![p]You should put this information....

    [ul][li]here[/ul]
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  • stike,Touche'

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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    Bobby-Q,
    well, if you agree with me, then i must be wrong.
    lemme go check 34 internet sources![p]peace, bro.[p]

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • Bobby-Q,
    Hey wait a minute!!!!!!!! I do all the linking around here! LMAO!![p]TNW

    The Naked Whiz
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