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London Broil help

hounddoghounddog Posts: 126
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I have searched the archives for london broil and have come up with a lot of information, but none that directly addresses my question.[p]I have a 4 lb london broil. It is about 1.5, maybe two inch thick. I want to cook it on a very hot egg.[p]I have marinated it in teriyaki and hot sauce. I am going to dry it, then rub it with some of obie cue's steak stuff.[p]Now, the last time I did london broil I ruint it cause it was mostly well done. ack. I am adept at cooking single serving steaks, usually like about 3 mins a side and dwell is a sometimes do sometimes don't kind of thing. The steak I ruint was not as big as the one I have. [p]Can I please have some guesses at cook time? [p]Thanks

Comments

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,283
    hounddog,
    Tim's site has a nice rundown. And pictures that are torture when your stomach is growling.[p]Would recommend using a....gulp....thermometer,and pulling at 140.[p]Have fun.
    NB

    [ul][li]Tim's London Broil[/ul]
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
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  • Tim MTim M Posts: 2,410
    london1.jpg
    <p />hounddog,[p]I do mine at 700-800 deg of the large Egg or 550-600 on the small Egg. Pictured is a 2.5 lb london broil (what ever cut that is) that I cooked for 4 min per side. Like Nature Boy said, I let it dwell and check with a quick read Polder type thermometer. It's the only way to be sure. With cooking times under 15 min, it's hard to cook by the clock and be identical from one cook to the next. It's better to cook to the desired temp with these short time cooks.[p]Tim

  • hounddoghounddog Posts: 126
    thanks guys. I tend to pull off at 135 or maybe even a little earlier. As long as it doesn't bark at me, I like it.
    You know, this brings to mind another topic. On a normal grill, I can cook pretty much any cut of beef or pork to the desired level of doneness without reference to timing it, but by watching it based on my experience and my read on the heat of the fire. With the egg, and I believe this is because it is either hotter or colder, depending on the type of cook, I find that I can't. At all. Except with reference to another egg cook. My solution, because I tend to overfuss with stuff I am not sure of, is to get a fair estimate of the expected time and then bring the thermometer in at that point. Perhaps not the best approach, but it works for me. So, based on that, and on what I see here, I am going to give it 5 mins a side, and then check it before dwelling prolly another 5

  • GWWGWW Posts: 43
    hounddog,
    I did a flank steak the other day for fajitas using the receipe out of smoke and spice, think it's a kinda the same cut of meat...or at least the same shape! Cooked at a dome temp of 250* indirect for 1 hour, came out perfect medium rare...juicy and yummy! Just a thought!
    Egg out =)

  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    hounddog,[p]JJ suggested I try his method for always creating the perfect doneness for London Broil a few years ago. I have yet to fail since. No guessing and no thermometers.[p]Sear in the Egg at 700F for 2 minutes each side. Remove and reduce vent openings on the Egg. Slice the london broil across the grain into 1/4" slices and place in a cast iron pan (short handled model is needed). Return pan to Egg to finish the cook.[p]Since you can see the progress of the cook, finishing is easy (and quick). The result; perfect doneness and considerable juices to use for the sauce.[p]Spin
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,283
    Spin,
    That sounds like a great way to do it. What should the cooking temp be when you return the meal to the cooker in the pan?? [p]Thanks
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
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  • SpinSpin Posts: 1,375
    Nature Boy,[p]Cooker temp tends to be in the 400-500°F range, but is not really important as finishing in the pan is only a couple of minutes. I tend to close the vents to positions for a 220°F low and slow cook when removing the seared LB.[p]The the pan is room temp (upon insertion) and the heat of the Egg needs to heat the pan while it finishes the cook on the meat from the air temp. The pan does collect a lot of good meat juices.[p]The beauty of the cook is the timing of the finish of the cook is up to you and your desires of what you want to see in the meat you used.[p]I do use the lift the dome and peek here :-).[p]Spin
  • hounddoghounddog Posts: 126
    I thank all for their comments.[p]I ended up cooking at 700+ for about 4 minutes a side, with a 5 minute dwell. I kept a small cast iron skillet handy in case I had guessed it wrong, and I pulled it earlier than I thought it was ready -- it measured between 110 and 130 depending on where i poked. I let it sit for 5 minutes, and then cut it. Medium rare throughout.[p]Also, I used Obie Cue's steak spice for the first time. I give it high marks. [p]A young lady was there whose mother is a firm vegetarian. She paled a little when she saw me slicing the beef, asking if it was cooked. When she tasted the goods, she went back for more 3 times. She ate so much she threw off my portion estimate for 6 adults. Oh, well. All that meant is I didn't have a lot left over.
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