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Tried the 100 degree water trick for NY Strips...Awesome

ScribsScribs Posts: 27
edited 6:28AM in EggHead Forum
I tried soaking NY Strips in 100 degree water last night and let me tell you I will never cook a steak any other way. It is a must try. Just Cowlick and nuked at 800 for 2 minutes a side then shut her down for another minute or two. Medium rare all the way through. My wife said it looked just like the steak on the Ruth Chris ad. [p]Scribs
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Comments

  • Dos HuevosDos Huevos Posts: 368
    Scribs,[p]This has gotten enough positive feedback that I think we'll try it this way the next steak night. [p]Man do I love this place.[p]Todd
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  • Scribs,
    how thick were they?

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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 17,128
    Scribs,
    i havent tried this on a good thick steak yet, but i did try it on 3/4 inch stip steaks this last weekend. just seared them and they were better than they would have been if i didnt warm them up in the sink. i am a little reluctant to try this with a 2 inch ribeye or other correctly cut piece of top grade meat as i do like the trex method, its so beer friendly. it definatly works on the thinner cut steaks. they definatly cook faster so those that use a watch will be burning things the first few times.

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  • SmokeySmokey Posts: 2,468
    Scribs,[p]I must have been asleep that day in class. What is the technique? Shed some light for this poor, deprived sole.[p]Smokey
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  • Clay QClay Q Posts: 4,418
    Scribs,
    I have a big tri-tip in the freezer.....think I'll give it a try this weekend.
    Clay

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  • Scribs,
    I tried that technique this weekend on a london broil, and got superior results also. It does shorten the cooking times by quite a bit, so extra monitoring is required. [p]Brett

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  • Kelly KeefeKelly Keefe Posts: 469
    Smokey,
    Click the link to go to the original thread.

    [ul][li]Cook's Illustrated[/ul]
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  • AZRPAZRP Posts: 10,116
    fishlessman,
    Don't be afraid, the first time I tried it was with was with 1-1/2" prime ribeyes at about $16 apiece. 2 min first side, 90 seconds on the flip, 10 min rest, perfect med rare. -RP

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  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Scribs:[p]Can you not accomplish the same result by letting the steaks covered with plastic wrap sit out on the counter for a period of time? An alternative way reach room temperature and get the desired results without all the fuss . . .
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  • AZRPAZRP Posts: 10,116
    djm5x9,
    No, water is a far superior conductor to air. Think of a piece of steel heated by a torch to red hot. It will take ten to fifteen minute to cool enough to touch but if you dunk it into a bucket of water you can handle it immediately. -RP

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  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    AZRP:[p]I understand the theory and use water to thaw meat in sealed bags regularly. The article states steaks one hour in water initially rated at 100 degrees. Not much different from letting cold steaks warm up on a counter over a couple of hours on a lazy Saturday afternoon. For me, I just save an extra step to reach the same results.
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  • Chef WilChef Wil Posts: 702
    djm5x9,
    one point to think about:
    1 hr. in water means hardly any bacteria, remember the 40 to 140 degree danger zone, cut meat sitting in a 75 degree room for 2 or 3 hrs, optimum chances of bacteria. FWIW.

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  • ScribsScribs Posts: 27
    The strips were 1 1/2 inches thick and they were definately warmer than room temperature. They were very soft once I pulled them out of the bag which also allowed the Cowlick to stick very well. [p]Scribs

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  • Chef Wil,
    You are saying 100 degree water for 1 hr. is better than leaving it out. How is that, 100 is in the middle of the "danger" zone?

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  • AZRPAZRP Posts: 10,116
    Scribs,
    That's what I noticed too. I'd describe them as mushy. I've never had a steak feel like that when setting them out on the counter to warm up. -RP

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  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Chef Wil:[p]I agree with you, but both methods could be considered risky with consideration to good food handling practice. It is a risk that healthy steak connoisseurs evidently do not mind taking.[p]Do specialty restaurants use methods like this with their steaks?

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  • ScribsScribs Posts: 27
    djm5x9,
    The short amount of time that the meat is in the "danger zone" is not enough time for it to become dangerous. If you put the steak in the bag and water when it is say 35 degrees it would only be over 40 degrees for about 45 minutes. Think about pork shoulder. It takes 6+ hours to get out of the "danger zone. I let all my meat sit on the counter to warm and it has never come out like this method. I did not see the article myself but I believe the technique was from a chef of a popular steak house. After seeing my steak I believe most good steak houses must do this since it is the only way to achieve such even cooking through the entire steak.[p]Scribs

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  • FlatEricFlatEric Posts: 56
    me,
    Is there a danger zone for beef? Best I can tell alot if not most pull their steaks before they reach 140. Shouldn't we all be dead?

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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    FlatEric,
    the baddies are outside, not inside

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • Chef WilChef Wil Posts: 702
    Scribs,
    most good steakhouses will NOT do this to a steak but instead pay close attention to creating a crust then slowly finishing it off, more like TREX. We can never figure how many steaks we need for a said lunch or diner. What would we do with leftover warmed steaks?

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  • Chef WilChef Wil Posts: 702
    me,
    don't forget your under water, baddies grow with moisture and oxygen, water is moisture but no oxygen and sitting in a sealed bag, very little chance of growth in an hour.

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  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Chef Wil:[p]Thanks for the insight . . .

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  • JasonJason Posts: 45
    Scribs,
    Wouldn't the shock and shere heat of being thrown onto 800 plus degree fiery inferno instantly kill any bacteria, besides the TREX steaks I made the other night wouldv'e been worth getting food poisoning, just a thought or really more of a question, later Jason

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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    Chef Wil,
    the 'oxygen' need is why smoking (especially in an egg) does NOT expose the pork butt to much danger at all in the early part of a cook.[p]4 fours at 140 in the smoker is NOT the same as 4 hours at 140 on your kitchen counter.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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