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cooking 11 pound brisket tomorrow

I'm a new owner of an xl egg and I'm looking for any tips or tricks for doing an 11 pounder tomorrow. I smoked a 6 pounder a couple weeks ago and it turned out ok, I know i can do better with a little guidance. Basically I'm a little nervous about the cooking time being that it should probably be on the grill for 16.5 hours. Can the egg cook for that long with out adding more charcoal, and how much wood chunks should I use and do I need to add more during the cooking time. I love my egg and I want to be a master with it. Thanks for taking the time to read this.
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Comments

  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    @yolkedout
    Let me say welcome aboard brother. Glad to have you among us. If no one answers your question I will offer what little I can when time allows. Cleaning a smoker and seasoning a new cast iron pan my wife picked up at the moment. Again welcome aboard my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • My last one wasnt that great so I'll be following this thread. I look forward to SGH's input.
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  • yolkedoutyolkedout Posts: 7
    my last one turned out ok. I wasn't sure what to expect the temperature of the meat was climbing so fast right off the start but my digital probe on the grill was reading 200-210 the whole time. I was expecting it to plateau and it did around the 160 mark. where I went wrong was the rub. waaaay to spicy for my liking.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    @yolkedout
    Quick question my friend and then I will take a shot at your question at hand. What type of wood are you using and what indirect set up do you have?

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    @yolkedout
    Are you still there my brother?

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • yolkedoutyolkedout Posts: 7
    I'm using oak and I have the plate setter for the egg
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    Drip pan?

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    @yolkedout
    I will offer a few tips and if I miss any thing feel free to ask.
    Given your time frame I would recommend cooking in the 275 degree arena. If you had more time on your side we would drop this temp some what. As to your wood. If you have good clean well seasoned oak go with between 4-6 fist sized chunks. If your wood is slightly green cut this amount in half. If you are not accustom to heavy smoke my friend use only 3 chunks. I have no way of knowing your smoke tolerance. That being said you be the judge. Once she is cooking just let her run. If you are going to wrap you need to do this around the 160 degree mark give or take a little depending on how she is looking. Wrapping is a choice not a must. You can wrap with either foil or butcher paper. Both give good results. On the egg I prefer paper for reasons I will discuss if needed. This is the tricky part. Let her cook until she probes tender in the thickest part of the flat. Don't concern yourself with the point just the flat. Feel free to ask any thing that I missed or that you are not sure of my friend. Seasoning, injecting or what ever my friend I will try to help.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    Again if you have any questions feel free to ask. Myself or someone will be glad to offer what we can.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    edited June 2014
    I just saw something I didn't answer. Your egg will easily run 18 hours if loaded full. Longer if you hand load.Sorry I missed that the first go around.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    Also if time becomes a issue you can bump the temp after you wrap. I can explain this further if needed. Just ask my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    And no you do not need to add more wood during the cook.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    Anything else brother?

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • yolkedoutyolkedout Posts: 7
    thanks i appreciate all the help. i used a drip pan on my last cook. I'm still on the fence about wrapping. like you said though with my time frame it might be a good idea. thanks again and ill let you know how it turns out.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    One last thing. When you trim be sure to remove all hard fat and knots as it will not render. Get the hard line between the point and flat as well. The rest of it you can just square it up if you like. No need to remove it as long as you get all the hard spots.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    I was not sure what advice you needed so I tried to provide general tips to help you along. I will be glad to answer any question you have remaining. Good luck my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    One last thing my friend. Please remember there are many different ways to skin a cat. The above has worked well for me thru the years. It's just how I like to do things. That being said do not dismiss others advice as there are some very accomplished cooks on this forum who give sound advice. Good luck my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
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  • minniemohminniemoh Posts: 1,096
    SGH definitely has you on the right track. I sure don't consider myself a brisket expert. I went through quite a few mediocre results before I started to get something I was proud of. I have had my best ones with fat cap down and no wrapping at 225 grid temp - got a lot more fat rendered out at the lower temp. Now I've only done about 7-8 briskets so I'm still a relative newbie.

    I have had a couple cooks where I didn't get as much smoke as I wanted. Now I make sure to mix the oak chunks into the lump rather than putting it on top. I make sure to get some chunks in the center of the egg as the fire in my L seems to burn most of the center lump and the oak chunks and lump on the perimeter is left over after the cook. (I know you're cooking on an XL so I don't know if there's a different "burn pattern" on a low-n-slow in the XL)

    As others will tell you, rest it for at least an hour after your cook. It makes a big difference in my opinion. Don't slice until you serve - it dries out VERY quickly once sliced. Good luck and have fun with it!
    L x2, M, S, and Mini. She says I have enough now....
    eggAddict from MN!
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  • msloanmsloan Posts: 250
    so what would you guys recommend as the best temp to pull a flat from the smoker for competition purposes?

    i know the recommendation is to pull when the thickest part of the flat probes like butter……but what temp is that on average?  and is that the best thing to do when trying to make sure you can get good slices for a competition?
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
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  • CremonCremon Posts: 21
    This is the first time I get to say this.  Glad you love your XL Egg and welcome to the cult!
    Marietta, GA

    Big Green Egg XL, 
    Cheap char grill for quick grilling
    110,000 BTU outdoor propane burner with an 18" Chinese wok.
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  • BYS1981BYS1981 Posts: 1,763
    msloan said:

    so what would you guys recommend as the best temp to pull a flat from the smoker for competition purposes?


    i know the recommendation is to pull when the thickest part of the flat probes like butter……but what temp is that on average?  and is that the best thing to do when trying to make sure you can get good slices for a competition?
    I'd shoot for 195-205.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    @msloan
    The reason I will not give a temp to pull at is because it will never be exactly the same temp. Once you have cooked many briskets you will learn that it is more of a FEEL that you are looking for and not a specific temp. Here are a few things that affect finish temp.
    Meat quality.
    Meat grade.
    How much hard and soft fat in the intramuscular structure.
    Weight.
    Time aged.
    Even the cooking process it's self. Examples- raised direct, indirect, reverse flow, direct flow, wrapped or unwrapped.
    There are just way to many variables for me to say your brisket will be perfect at a particular temp. I can give a broad range that they will fall in depending on several factors.
    I have seen some top quality grade briskets done as low as 187. At the other end of the spectrum I have seen some less than average cuts taken as high as 208 before done. Again it's a feel that you should be more concerned with in my opinion. I hope this helps my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    ·
  • I put mine on at 275 at 8am. It hit 190 at 4pm. I started probing it. It went in smooth ( gotta LOVE that) at 430 with temp 195. Pulled, foiled and coolered. Ill start a new thread when I slice it. It looks great, hope yours goes well.
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  • yolkedoutyolkedout Posts: 7
    hey everyone just wanted to say thanks for the advice and sorry for my very late response. The brisket turned out great. Wrapped at 160 and pulled and put in cooler for an hour at 185. the whole cook took about 17 hours and the egg was amazing! held temp the whole time. I would post pictures but i never got a chance to take any. We had a party of about 30 people and everything went fast. I did a side of bbq beans and a friend brought his pellet smoker and did chicken. Thanks again everyone. Cant wait for my next cook.
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  • badinfluencebadinfluence Posts: 1,136
    msloan said:

    so what would you guys recommend as the best temp to pull a flat from the smoker for competition purposes?


    i know the recommendation is to pull when the thickest part of the flat probes like butter……but what temp is that on average?  and is that the best thing to do when trying to make sure you can get good slices for a competition?
    At a competition I pull at 207
    1 XXL BGE, 1 XL BGE, 3 LG BGE, 3 MED. BGE, 1 SM. BGE, 2 MINI BGE, 1 MINI MAX , 1 Peoria custom cooker Meat Monster.


    Clinton, Iowa
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  • msloanmsloan Posts: 250
    so what would you guys recommend as the best temp to pull a flat from the smoker for competition purposes?

    i know the recommendation is to pull when the thickest part of the flat probes like butter……but what temp is that on average?  and is that the best thing to do when trying to make sure you can get good slices for a competition?
    At a competition I pull at 207
    thanks!
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
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  • msloanmsloan Posts: 250
    SGH said:
    @msloan‌ The reason I will not give a temp to pull at is because it will never be exactly the same temp. Once you have cooked many briskets you will learn that it is more of a FEEL that you are looking for and not a specific temp. Here are a few things that affect finish temp. Meat quality. Meat grade. How much hard and soft fat in the intramuscular structure. Weight. Time aged. Even the cooking process it's self. Examples- raised direct, indirect, reverse flow, direct flow, wrapped or unwrapped. There are just way to many variables for me to say your brisket will be perfect at a particular temp. I can give a broad range that they will fall in depending on several factors. I have seen some top quality grade briskets done as low as 187. At the other end of the spectrum I have seen some less than average cuts taken as high as 208 before done. Again it's a feel that you should be more concerned with in my opinion. I hope this helps my friend.
    it helps a bunch thanks for replying!
    gettin lucky in kentucky!   2 XL eggs!
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 11,446
    @yolkedout
    Glad it turned out for you my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    ·
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