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Potential table out of Maple Bowling Alley Floor

HibbyHibby Posts: 592
Watching Salvage Dawgs a few weeks ago and saw the guys visited a place very close to me that had salvaged pieces of maple bowling alley floor. Thought it might make a good LBGE table top. Wanted to check quick with you guys to see if you know of any drawbacks of using maple/bowling alley floor (the floor is a bunch of narrow planks glued together)? Additionally, what's a good length for a large table?i. Currently just using a nest. Thanks, Chris
I cook. I eat. I repeat. Thornville, Ohio
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Comments

  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,448
    edited May 2014
    My only concern would be the type of glue used if it was waterproof or not since that was made to be inside. Maybe someone will know that. Otherwise maple is a good choice due to the tight grain, but just the same I would finish it with spar marine varnish. Three coats and it will withstand a lot. BTW be sure to finish the ends and underneath as well to completely seal the wood. Otherwise water can wick up under the finish.
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,115
    im thinking it would need to be well varnished both sides, maybe even epoxied then a marine spar finish would hold up well. have seen bowling alley cutting block tables at an old remote fishing camp before but they were indoors, great work top
  • dmaroisdmarois Posts: 52
    i have  a few slabs of this, the only hard part is cutting through it. lots of horizontal nails throughout but if you take your time its ok. I've been debating using a slab of it for this purpose as well, I have one that is already stripped and planed but just needs to be sealed. 
  • GATravellerGATraveller Posts: 4,669
    edited May 2014
    Lebowski approved!!  That sounds like a great idea.
    “Eighty-eight percent of my stories are true and the rest are embellished" 
                                                                -Col Bruce Hampton Ret.
    2 Large
    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • HibbyHibby Posts: 592
    edited May 2014
    Thanks for the quick responses. Heading to pick up a piece now.
    I cook. I eat. I repeat. Thornville, Ohio
  • vchelfvchelf Posts: 95

    The plans I am looking at show the large tables for the Large BGE to be between 57 and 60 inches wide and 24 to 27 inches deep.


    Victor Chelf
    Houston, TX
     
    Just one Large BGE
    Visit my Victor's Vittles blog - dedicated to my Big Green Eggventures

  • DaveRichardsonDaveRichardson Posts: 2,312
    Interesting idea.  Definitely need to be diligent with sealing.  Got my wheels turning!

    LBGE #19 from North GA Eggfest, 2014

    Stockbridge, GA - just south of Atlanta where we are covered up in Zombies!  #TheWalkingDead films practically next door!

  • HicHic Posts: 350
    I was actually look @ this yesterday and thought maybe you'd find it useful  Link

    Large, medium, small and a mini. Egg'n, golfing, beer drinking, camping and following football and baseball.
    Atlanta NOTP suburbia.

  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,270
    Hic said:
    I was actually look @ this yesterday and thought maybe you'd find it useful  Link
    Interesting link. I knew they were nailed (LOTS of nails), but didn't realize they weren't glued. I just assumed both. Gonna have to shore it up so it doesn't flex. Should be fun cutting a circle too. :) Good luck!

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • SMITTYtheSMOKERSMITTYtheSMOKER Posts: 2,612
    I have built a couple of work benches and table tops from salvaged bowling lanes.  Tough to saw (nails ruin plenty of saw blades).  Beautiful when finished.  Cutting a hole would be a challenge IMO.

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 955
    As soon as I read the topic I went "ohhhhhh" man that will look really nice! +1 on stripping and using a nice marine grade varnish.
    Bristow Virginia XL&Mini One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • HibbyHibby Posts: 592
    Well I got it home. Man is it heavy. I got a piece 6'2" and I bet it weighs over 250 lbs. @Hic‌ thanks for the link. It told me things I hadn't realized. I think this is going to be really challenging. Although mechanically inclined, I'm no carpenter - not even a little bit. I'm intimidated and will be scouring the internet for ideas. I'll post a picture here shortly.
    I cook. I eat. I repeat. Thornville, Ohio
  • Iceman5705Iceman5705 Posts: 83
    I also had this idea.  I have a few huge slabs of bowling alley that was salvaged originally for countertop.  I'd love to figure out how to use it for my BGE XL.


  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,115
    Hibby said:
    Well I got it home. Man is it heavy. I got a piece 6'2" and I bet it weighs over 250 lbs. @Hic‌ thanks for the link. It told me things I hadn't realized. I think this is going to be really challenging. Although mechanically inclined, I'm no carpenter - not even a little bit. I'm intimidated and will be scouring the internet for ideas. I'll post a picture here shortly.
    seeing its not glued you could reinforce it with a couple coats of epoxy and a fiberglss sheet covering the whole table top, then a light sand and several coats marine spar varnish. its how they reinforce strip canoes, you wont see the clothe as it becomes transparent. its a simple as lay the cloth down and spread the epoxy out over it with a yellow plastic putty knife like they use in autobody work. it will be strong and the spar will keep the epoxy from yellowing over time
  • HibbyHibby Posts: 592
    I feel pretty lucky that I got a piece with the arrows or darts. Obviously too deep and I'll have to knock a few pieces off each side to make the arrows centered. Time to do some internet digging.
    I cook. I eat. I repeat. Thornville, Ohio
  • DaveRichardsonDaveRichardson Posts: 2,312
    Rocklear circle cutting jig for the router is the way to go.  Take it a centimeter or less at each pass and slowly nibble the circle away.  The cutout would make a great serving tray as well!  Throw a could of stainless cabinet pulls thru the top for handles....  SWEET!

    LBGE #19 from North GA Eggfest, 2014

    Stockbridge, GA - just south of Atlanta where we are covered up in Zombies!  #TheWalkingDead films practically next door!

  • dmaroisdmarois Posts: 52
    as for reinforcement I had a friend who works at a steel mill and he grabbed me 3 pieces that were about 3"wide and a 1/4" thick of raw steel.


  • HibbyHibby Posts: 592
    @DaveRichardson‌ that Rockler jig does look like it will work great. My real concern is how would the router bit respond should it come into contact with a nail - and I'm sure it will.
    I cook. I eat. I repeat. Thornville, Ohio
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,448
    Hibby said:
    @DaveRichardson‌ that Rockler jig does look like it will work great. My real concern is how would the router bit respond should it come into contact with a nail - and I'm sure it will.

    I agree 101%! Unless he is a tool nut like some of us who look for any excuse to add a new tool or tool accessory then the same type of jig to cut a circle with a router can be made for peanuts using scrap. I also agree that he better wear good eye protection and plan to burn up some expensive carbide tipped router bits and if his router isn't a heavy duty one that task may even burn up a common router!
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 24,912

    RRP said:
    Hibby said:
    @DaveRichardson‌ that Rockler jig does look like it will work great. My real concern is how would the router bit respond should it come into contact with a nail - and I'm sure it will.

    I agree 101%! Unless he is a tool nut like some of us who look for any excuse to add a new tool or tool accessory then the same type of jig to cut a circle with a router can be made for peanuts using scrap. I also agree that he better wear good eye protection and plan to burn up some expensive carbide tipped router bits and if his router isn't a heavy duty one that task may even burn up a common router!
    I made a jig from some scrap wood, worked perfectly. 

    Some tips, however.  Use a plunge router.  A twist base router will never put the bit in the same place as you lower the bit through successive passes.  Use a fluted spiral bit made from tool steel.  Carbide tipped will break hitting the nail.  Slow the router down when you start hitting nails.  Once you're past the nails you can finish from the other side with a trim bit. It's hard to find a router bit long enough to go as deep as you'll need to cut, and cutting with the jig from the other side is very difficult to align.

    Adjust the depth of the cut based on the strength of your router.  You do not want to try to remote too much wood at once and burn it up.  Also, you want to get a vacuum and remove the chips on every rotation.

    This is the general type of bit to use.  If you didn't have nails, you could use a carbide tip bit.
    http://www.toolstoday.com/p-6237-solid-carbide-spiral-cnc-router-bits-end-mills-for-steel-stainless-steel-non-ferrous-metal-with-altin-aluminum-titanium-nitride-coating.aspx
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 2,061
    Agree with @nolaegghead‌. High speed steel bits will handle a few encounters with a nail. A plunge router is the tool for this job. Also agree that a homemade jig is very easy to make. If you cut the hole carefully, you can use the cutout for a side table or prep table too.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • DaveRichardsonDaveRichardson Posts: 2,312
    Yes, I love my tools, but the rocklear jig was a suggestion. Using 1/4 inch plywood or hardboard works just fine. I've used that method as well...

    LBGE #19 from North GA Eggfest, 2014

    Stockbridge, GA - just south of Atlanta where we are covered up in Zombies!  #TheWalkingDead films practically next door!

  • TackmanTackman Posts: 230
    Where did you get that? Out of the gutter? Get it--bowling joke!!
    Cleveland, Ohio
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 24,912
    Yes, I love my tools, but the rocklear jig was a suggestion. Using 1/4 inch plywood or hardboard works just fine. I've used that method as well...
    That jig is a good suggestion.  I almost bought one and probably will if I don't build my CNC router.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • YEMTreyYEMTrey Posts: 5,318
    Is it possible to remove the oil from the wood?  Long time bowler here and I know they drench these boards with oil every night.  Does the wood soak up any of that?  Is it flammable?  Safe to set food on?
    Cool idea, and I think it will look nice when finished.
    Steve 
    XL and a Mini Max Egg in Cincinnati, Ohio

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 24,912

    YEMTrey said:
    Is it possible to remove the oil from the wood?  Long time bowler here and I know they drench these boards with oil every night.  Does the wood soak up any of that?  Is it flammable?  Safe to set food on?
    Cool idea, and I think it will look nice when finished.
    I would sand it, of course, but any oil residue isn't going to hurt.  Spar varnish actually has quite a bit of non-polymerizing oil in it to keep the finish flexible.   Most wood has oil in it naturally.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • HibbyHibby Posts: 592
    I don't think there is any stain. I could be wrong but the whole surface is covered with a very thick plastic sheet.i can pull on it as there's a corner where it's pulling apart but it's well adhered to the wood surface. From what I understand, I'll need to use a heat gun to peel the whole surface off.
    I cook. I eat. I repeat. Thornville, Ohio
  • Fred19FlintstoneFred19Flintstone Posts: 7,287



    Yes, I love my tools, but the rocklear jig was a suggestion. Using 1/4 inch plywood or hardboard works just fine. I've used that method as well...

    That jig is a good suggestion.  I almost bought one and probably will if I don't build my CNC router.


    Building a CNC router? Damn impressive Nola!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 24,912
    Yes, I love my tools, but the rocklear jig was a suggestion. Using 1/4 inch plywood or hardboard works just fine. I've used that method as well...
    That jig is a good suggestion.  I almost bought one and probably will if I don't build my CNC router.
    Building a CNC router? Damn impressive Nola!
    I built a small one to learn about how they work (kit - Zen CNC), want a big one for man projects :D
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 16,487
    edited May 2014
    Hibby said:

    I feel pretty lucky that I got a piece with the arrows or darts. Obviously too deep and I'll have to knock a few pieces off each side to make the arrows centered. Time to do some internet digging.

    What are the dimensions of the piece pictured here? (if you already stated that I didn't see it in the thread). It would be a shame to lose to much of the detail to fit into a dimension window per se. Could it be milled/routered to 60"-72"L X 30"W without losing details after the hole is cut? Very unique---like it
    Edit: I see overall length is 6'2".
    :-bd
    LBGE 2013 & MM 2014
    Die Hard HUSKER & BRONCO FAN
    Flying Low & Slow in "Da Burg" FL
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