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Chicken Curry

DMWDMW Posts: 6,848
So I was at my dealer (we all have one, right) earlier this week and picked up some Dizzy Pig Bombay Curryish. Decided to go to the source for a recipe.


Really good, fairly easy as well. All done on the Small in a Lodge CI Dutch Oven, uncovered the whole time. I tossed a wood chunk in after the lump was established, before putting the DO in. Not sure what kind it was, it was loose in my deck box.

After browning the chicken, pulled it out, and this is after the onions/garlic/potatoes/tomato paste were going for a swim.
image

Time for the chicken and yogurt to join in the fun.
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Simmer for a few more minutes
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And time to eat
image

Was served with rice, no plated pics, rather rushed ordeal tonight. I can see this being used in lots going forward. Great flavor already mixed up and ready to go.
My Facebook Place where I document my cooking
Morgantown, PA
XL BGE - S BGE - Blackstone Pizza Oven - 30" Steel Fire Pit w/Cooking Grid - Hasty Bake Legacy - KJ Jr - Gasser
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Comments

  • tulocaytulocay Posts: 1,737
    how was the heat level of that bombay currish?
    LBGE, Marietta, GA
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  • hapsterhapster Posts: 6,938
    Looks fantastic
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  • Love Curry-ish! Got it in roasted veg right now while doing a spatchcock chicken with red eye express
    Lovin' my Large Egg since May 2012 (Richmond, VA) ... and makin' cookbooks at http://familycookbookproject.com
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    That looks great! Did you fry the chicken until crispy first? Try just browning it a bit next time - you may like it even more.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • DMWDMW Posts: 6,848
    caliking said:
    That looks great! Did you fry the chicken until crispy first? Try just browning it a bit next time - you may like it even more.
    Thanks @caliking. The photo does make it look fried, but no, it was just browned. I tossed it with the Curryish before browning, left the fond behind to mix with the onions when they went in. 
    My Facebook Place where I document my cooking
    Morgantown, PA
    XL BGE - S BGE - Blackstone Pizza Oven - 30" Steel Fire Pit w/Cooking Grid - Hasty Bake Legacy - KJ Jr - Gasser
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  • DMWDMW Posts: 6,848
    tulocay said:
    how was the heat level of that bombay currish?
    @tulocay Not too hot at all. I think if it was just me I would probably add some additional heat. For SWMBO and the kids it was right on, and they don't go for really spice food.
    My Facebook Place where I document my cooking
    Morgantown, PA
    XL BGE - S BGE - Blackstone Pizza Oven - 30" Steel Fire Pit w/Cooking Grid - Hasty Bake Legacy - KJ Jr - Gasser
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    I thought that might be the case, but I couldn't tell from the pic.

    As a variation, try the following sequence:
    oil
    onions
    garlic/ginger
    chicken
    Curry-ish
    tomato (paste/sauce/puree)
    water

    Add the potatoes either after the onions or after the tomato, depending on whether you like them browned first or not. About 5-7 mins between each step to saute/brown things in the pot. After adding the water, cook until the chicken and potatoes are done and the sauce is the consistency you like.

    And then send me a plate :)



    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • DMWDMW Posts: 6,848
    @caliking I'll give that a try next time. Just to be sure, still brown the chicken first?
    My Facebook Place where I document my cooking
    Morgantown, PA
    XL BGE - S BGE - Blackstone Pizza Oven - 30" Steel Fire Pit w/Cooking Grid - Hasty Bake Legacy - KJ Jr - Gasser
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,322
    I really hate to say this but the curry-ish has way too much fennel for me.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,322
    DMW said:
    @caliking I'll give that a try next time. Just to be sure, still brown the chicken first?
    You don't really brown the meat in Indian gravies. You fry it in the mixture of spices, onions, garlic, ginger, tomatoes etc. It picks up the colour of the masala and whatever else is in there. This is true of gravies (curries) but there are a lot of fried dishes. A lot of the meats are pressure cooked with almost no browning and then "stewed" with the other stuff.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    DMW said:
    @caliking I'll give that a try next time. Just to be sure, still brown the chicken first?
    You don't really brown the meat in Indian gravies. You fry it in the mixture of spices, onions, garlic, ginger, tomatoes etc. It picks up the colour of the masala and whatever else is in there. This is true of gravies (curries) but there are a lot of fried dishes. A lot of the meats are pressure cooked with almost no browning and then "stewed" with the other stuff.
    Much love, respect, and props, but I must disagree. 

    Most Indian (or thereabouts) meats are browned a bit first, with the onions/ginger/garlic/spices.  Not as heavily browned/seared as most Western recipes meats, but lightly. Even for pressure cooker recipes, the meat should not be added after  the water at the end to cook. Water goes in at the end to make the sauce/gravy. Seafood (fish, shrimp) usually does not usually get browned and is added to the sauce/gravy at the end to cook quickly until done. 

    But one need not be so rigid. Try both ways, @DMW and see what you like. My melanin is my street cred! :)

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    I really hate to say this but the curry-ish has way too much fennel for me.
    Yes, but its a reasonable starting point. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,341
    DMW said:
    @caliking I'll give that a try next time. Just to be sure, still brown the chicken first?
    You don't really brown the meat in Indian gravies. You fry it in the mixture of spices, onions, garlic, ginger, tomatoes etc. It picks up the colour of the masala and whatever else is in there. This is true of gravies (curries) but there are a lot of fried dishes. A lot of the meats are pressure cooked with almost no browning and then "stewed" with the other stuff.
    Wassup Steve?! Hope all is well up yonder. My whole take on curry (not the seasoning, but a pot of curry) was inspired my my vietnamese mom in law. There are as many styles of "curry" as there are cooks who cook the eclectic dish that is "curry" in peoples' minds. My Mom in law had her own totally wild take on it. She would cut leg quarters with a cleaver…right through the bone. She'd season it up and brown those hard in the pan and end up with a ton of fond and fat. She'd fry the potatoes. She used a curry paste in a jar and it was Indian inspired (as opposed to Thai, English or whatever). Anyways, she always served it with crunchy baguettes purchased at the local bakery and extra crunched in the oven before serving. It was full blown nirvana….I will always remember it. Once in a while you got a little crunchy sliver of bone, bit the broth was rich and…..I digress.  I have had so many unique curries, and always hated the English version…they use stuff like raisins.

    DMW, looks like a great cook! Appreciate you posting, and glad to hear all enjoyed.
    Happy cookin!
    Chris
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,280
    Chris, I agree with you on the English version.  And I HATE raisins in anything savory.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,302

    Chris, I agree with you on the English version.  And I HATE raisins in anything savory.

    Picadillo feels bad for you.
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,280
    Chris, I agree with you on the English version.  And I HATE raisins in anything savory.
    Picadillo feels bad for you.
    86 any raisins, honey or other sweetness and I'm all-in.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    Chris, I agree with you on the English version.  And I HATE raisins in anything savory.
    This is where LS pipes in with "y'all put raisins in yer jambalaya??" :D

    [Raisins are often added in biryani (meat pilaf type of dish). LS made some at an eggfest. He thought it turned out pretty well... until someone asked the above question].

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
    ·
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    Wassup Steve?! Hope all is well up yonder. My whole take on curry (not the seasoning, but a pot of curry) was inspired my my vietnamese mom in law. There are as many styles of "curry" as there are cooks who cook the eclectic dish that is "curry" in peoples' minds. My Mom in law had her own totally wild take on it. She would cut leg quarters with a cleaver…right through the bone. She'd season it up and brown those hard in the pan and end up with a ton of fond and fat. She'd fry the potatoes. She used a curry paste in a jar and it was Indian inspired (as opposed to Thai, English or whatever). Anyways, she always served it with crunchy baguettes purchased at the local bakery and extra crunched in the oven before serving. It was full blown nirvana….I will always remember it. Once in a while you got a little crunchy sliver of bone, bit the broth was rich and…..I digress.  I have had so many unique curries, and always hated the English version…they use stuff like raisins.

    DMW, looks like a great cook! Appreciate you posting, and glad to hear all enjoyed.
    Happy cookin!
    Chris
    That sounds really good!

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
    ·
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,322
    caliking said:
    DMW said:
    @caliking I'll give that a try next time. Just to be sure, still brown the chicken first?
    You don't really brown the meat in Indian gravies. You fry it in the mixture of spices, onions, garlic, ginger, tomatoes etc. It picks up the colour of the masala and whatever else is in there. This is true of gravies (curries) but there are a lot of fried dishes. A lot of the meats are pressure cooked with almost no browning and then "stewed" with the other stuff.
    Much love, respect, and props, but I must disagree. 

    Most Indian (or thereabouts) meats are browned a bit first, with the onions/ginger/garlic/spices.  Not as heavily browned/seared as most Western recipes meats, but lightly. Even for pressure cooker recipes, the meat should not be added after  the water at the end to cook. Water goes in at the end to make the sauce/gravy. Seafood (fish, shrimp) usually does not usually get browned and is added to the sauce/gravy at the end to cook quickly until done. 

    But one need not be so rigid. Try both ways, @DMW and see what you like. My melanin is my street cred! :)
    That was kind of what I meant by frying it in the spice as opposed to frying the meat in oil by itself. I have never seen a really caramelized exterior on any meat in curries like you would in a western stew.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    LS- read your post again, and we are indeed saying the same thing

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 4,661
    That's more or less how we curry too.  btw, LS I know we're supposed to grind curry powder from scratch, but our go to commercial curry powder is Baba's Meat Curry Powder from Malaysia, decent taste and real time saver.
    Vaughan, ON
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,322
    caliking said:
    Chris, I agree with you on the English version.  And I HATE raisins in anything savory.
    This is where LS pipes in with "y'all put raisins in yer jambalaya??" :D

    [Raisins are often added in biryani (meat pilaf type of dish). LS made some at an eggfest. He thought it turned out pretty well... until someone asked the above question].
    It's funny cause Chris (Nature Boy) was there too. He said that he normally didn't like fruit or nuts in savoury dishes but really liked it.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • DMWDMW Posts: 6,848
    Maybe I have my terms mixed up. I seasoned the chicken pieces with the Curryish before browning in a minimal amount of oil. Would this be considered frying?

    And what I'm hearing is there are multiple correct ways to prepare a dish cooked in multiple countries, some larger than the US? ;)

    My Facebook Place where I document my cooking
    Morgantown, PA
    XL BGE - S BGE - Blackstone Pizza Oven - 30" Steel Fire Pit w/Cooking Grid - Hasty Bake Legacy - KJ Jr - Gasser
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  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 946
    @dmw Try that rub on chicken bombs it's fantastic! Franco from CGW was at Dizzy Fest last year and he made them with Bombay Curryish and that is my family favorite!
    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,322
    caliking said:
    LS- read your post again, and we are indeed saying the same thing
    It's OK. I was hurt at first but I'm over it now.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,978
    caliking said:
    LS- read your post again, and we are indeed saying the same thing
    It's OK. I was hurt at first but I'm over it now.
    My turn:  :x

     


    DMW said:
    Maybe I have my terms mixed up. I seasoned the chicken pieces with the Curryish before browning in a minimal amount of oil. Would this be considered frying?

    And what I'm hearing is there are multiple correct ways to prepare a dish cooked in multiple countries, some larger than the US? ;)

    Shocking concept, aint it? :D However, I am claiming "curry" for the Indian subcontinent, since most of the spices used are indigenous to the area. And you have it right - most Indian recipes play fast and loose with cooking terms and even measurements. There is no consensus in Indian cookbooks about how much a teaspoon actually measures, for example. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,926
    I think I'm gonna try this this weekend. Need to go and replensih some of my spices so I'll pick up the curry-ish as well. Hope they have the mediterraneanish too.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

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