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Feet or no feet..... that is the question.

GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
So I looked at a lot of other peoples tables while researching to build my Egg home. I saw many eggs directly on a piece of slate or tile of some kind and decided to do the same with mine. It's rests on landscaping stone that is nice and level. When I posted in the table section I recieved lots of positive feed back but a lot of people said that I should put my egg in a table nest and I'm not sure why. I also thought about using the egg feet if I really need to get it up off the stone but BGE doesn't make them any more, why? I feel like it gets better support if the whole bottom of the egg is resting on something. Please give me some input so I can figure if I need to change this up.

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Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!

Comments

  • RockosteelRockosteel Posts: 40
    Are you planning on cleaning it out with a wet/dry vac? The lip in front of your lower vent looks as if clean out will be an issue - might be a reason for use of a nest
    Charlotte, nc
  • mimaulermimauler Posts: 118
    I wouldn't change anything it's resting on stone which will not catch on fire.  The only other reason I could think of would be to get an air circulation in there and doesn't seem to be any need for that.  My opinion is leave it. 
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
    edited March 9

    Are you planning on cleaning it out with a wet/dry vac? The lip in front of your lower vent looks as if clean out will be an issue - might be a reason for use of a nest

    That piece is temporary. I sealed the cracks of the stone with polymer sand and I haven't built the face frame yet. I needed something to keep the sand in place.
    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • calracefancalracefan Posts: 472
    Air gap is your friend, the heat from your egg that is in direct contact will transfer to the stone, it can the transfer from the stone to surrounding wood. Some cooks are long ,I think it better to be safe than sorry !

    Ova B.
    Fulton MO
  • mimaulermimauler Posts: 118
    I may be completely wrong but I would think it would take a very long time at a very hot temp for the stone to combust the wood.
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603

    Air gap is your friend, the heat from your egg that is in direct contact will transfer to the stone, it can the transfer from the stone to surrounding wood. Some cooks are long ,I think it better to be safe than sorry !

    I will have to do an experimental burn I think and check the wood
    Under the stone after a really long burn. The stone is a little over 2" thick.

    Does anyone know why BGE stopped making the feet? There are some other people making them. Are there any support issues with using the feet? There wouldn't be any support for the bottom of the egg if I used those.

    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,760
    I use a nest but FWIW I am in the air-gap camp.  You may not see the heat effects in the short-term but over time the wood will dry out and either the BGE loses the fight to gravity or a slow smoldering fire will start.  
    WRT feet-BGE went to some sort of stand to support the BGE in lieu of the feet.  Ditch the feet and charge for the stand-more $$ for corporate-just an opinion...
    Louisville
  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 893
    I think @centex - his table caught on fire with a stone underneath. I would at a minimum use the egg feet- I would lean towards the little nest lifters. Not worth burning down the house.
    Greensboro, NC
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
    edited March 9
    Lousubcap are you saying the feet are ok they just found the table nest more profitable? I don't really want to raise the egg any as it's at the perfect height for me. The feet would be the better option for me if I need to make a change as long as it doesn't create an issue with support for the bottom of the egg.
    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • DMWDMW Posts: 3,316
    I wonder if the lack of support for the center of the Egg is the reason they went away from the feet and to the table nest. Just a theory, but perhaps they had issues with the base failing and it was because of lack of support for the center.
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,760
    @GeorgeS-the feet did fine for the history of the BGE until around two years ago, so I'm guessing they will do fine now.  Hopefully some who use the feet for their BGE table setup will be along.
    Louisville
  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 1,480
    Here's a read about the effects on heat transferred from the Egg through a paver to the wood below: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/eggbase/eggbase.htm

    Feet were never intended for XL Eggs. BGE did not provide them for XLs. I recall reading something about too much unsupported area potentially leading to damage to the Egg bottom.
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs
    Bay Area, CA
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,410
    DMW said:
    I wonder if the lack of support for the center of the Egg is the reason they went away from the feet and to the table nest. Just a theory, but perhaps they had issues with the base failing and it was because of lack of support for the center.
    Don't think the issue with feet was lack of support in the center of the egg, the table best really only supports on the four contact points. Like many here, air gap is your friend. I'd get a gap in there - not today, but maybe next year. The table nest makes it ideal to rake ash out, a standard foil pan will slide right under. 
    IMGP2480.jpg
    4288 x 2848 - 875K
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,045
    I did the table nest over ceramic tiles. You should be fine temp wise though, especially if your stone is 2" thick.  

    Clean out can be an issue though as @skiddymarker said.  Though I can easily get the pan in on mine, I usually remove the grate and clean out with a dustpan.  To my way of thinking the ash tool is a pain in the A**
    egg-table.jpg
    920 x 710 - 176K
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
    I haven't had any issues with ash clean out. I use my fireplace shovel and it fits right through the hole. I might just turn my nest into a table nest. Maybe I could just cut off the legs. I was going to use like 6 of the large terra cotta pot feet. So does the table nest give more base support than the feet would?
    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • DuranhlerDuranhler Posts: 78
    FWIW - My XL in the nest, contacts only on the leg contact points. The center support does not contact the center of the egg.
    Peoria, AZ == XL BGE, Weber 22.5 Redhead, Fiesta Blue Ember Gasser
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
    edited March 9
    Duranhler said:

    FWIW - My XL in the nest, contacts only on the leg contact points. The center support does not contact the center of the egg.

    Just checked and verified the same thing. The egg only rests on about 1-1/2" of the nest frame. There is no contact in the middle of the nest so I see no reason why I couldn't use the terra cotta pot rests I was planning to use.

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    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • ZmokinZmokin Posts: 336
    I would recommend the use of the nest or the feet if you still have them.  I don't think there is a need to support from the center, in fact supporting in just the center would be more likely to cause the egg to crack, the weight of the egg is transferred to the outer edges of the bottom, not the center unless that is the only point of contact.
    Large BGE in a Sole' Gourmet Table
    Using the Black Cast Iron grill, Plate Setter,
     and a BBQ Guru temp controller.

    Location: somewhere West of the Mason-Dixon Line
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 10,505
    Stone conducts heat. I've seen post here of the wood underneath scorched.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • calracefancalracefan Posts: 472
    mimauler said:
    I may be completely wrong but I would think it would take a very long time at a very hot temp for the stone to combust the wood.
    Do you really want to take the chance ? There have been posts in the past of burnt tables , most of which sit close to their home.
    Ova B.
    Fulton MO
  • I had a piece of tile under my XL and after about 10 cooks I heard a loud POP.. Well, the tile cracked in about 4 pieces from the heat. After that, I spent the $25 and got the nest for her. Life is much better with airflow under the BGE.
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
    I installed six of these under the egg today. Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos
    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • HDmstngHDmstng Posts: 143
    Not sure what the size of the feet are, but the surface area of the nest that comes in contact with the bottom of the egg looks to be much greater. That bigger area will better distribute the pressure.
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
    HDmstng said:

    Not sure what the size of the feet are, but the surface area of the nest that comes in contact with the bottom of the egg looks to be much greater. That bigger area will better distribute the pressure.

    Check up a little on the post. I put up a picture of the nest base. The egg is only in contact with the nest in four spots and it's a little over 1" x 1-1/2" at each spot. The pot feet are 1" x 1-3/4". They are actually about a 1/4" longer. I also used 6 of them which should give me better support than the nest.
    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
  • Tigers34Tigers34 Posts: 16
    I am resting my large egg on top of 3 fire bricks that sit on top of a stone paver.  It seems to allow good air flow. 
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 6,768
    edited March 10
    George, I would be at least as concerned about the wood surrounding the egg as about the underside. Eggs get very hot - especially in an enclosed space. Yours appears to be on a deck which I assume is attached to your house. Sure would be a shame...

    I used to have mine on a small wood deck attached to my house. After seeing a few photos of what can happen, I moved it to a patio (pavers on the ground). For example...

    Lit's table
    image

    LS's house

    image

    Poolman's table
    image

    Fish's table (2" thick)
    image

    lowercase bill's mini
    image

    And then there's the roof (pic from a post by Hotrodden)
    image

    Not trying to be an alarmist, though I guess it seems that way. Just want folks to think about this stuff! Ask Steve how much fun he had with his insurance company.  

    Be safe!

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

    "Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screwtop jars. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don't deserve to eat garlic." Bourdain
  • GeorgeSGeorgeS Posts: 603
    edited March 11
    I installed some feet yesterday. I am definitely not looking to talk with the insurance man any time soon. Those are very scary pictures! The fire stack is pretty crazy!! How hot was the grill pumping I wonder? I also had the grill up at 550-600 two weeks ago for about 2.5 hours cooking pizza and dogs. I checked both the wood walls and the ceiling and nothing was hot enough to be concerned about. The walls weren't even warm, the ceiling was warm but not hot at all.
    Bristow Virginia XLBGE One of the best feelings in life is watching other people enjoy the food I cooked!
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