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Very first Tri TIp

Slightly over cooked, it ended up in the medium range. I meant to take pictures to post but it took so long to cook and I got excited and forgot to take the pictures. Pretty good taste. I think I would do it slightly different next time. 

Comments

  • SGHSGH Posts: 2,883
    How did you cook it? Direct or indirect

  • ShiffShiff Posts: 1,044
    I generally do a reverse sear when I cook Tri Tip.  I usually cook it medium since my wife likes it a little more done. 

    Barry Lancaster, PA
  • ChuckRChuckR Posts: 30
    I cooked indirect until it hit 115, then I did my first reverse sear for about 5 minutes per side
  • ShiffShiff Posts: 1,044
    That's about what I do.  Had a hard time locating Tri Tip in  this area (Lancaster, PA) until I found 2 supermarkets that would order them for me. One of them has started to carry it on a semi-regular basis due to other's requests.
    Barry Lancaster, PA
  • ChuckRChuckR Posts: 30
    I just happened to see one at Costco so I grabbed it. 
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 443
    Funny, I've got a thread running right now about reverse searing and it was, in part, inspired because I'm curious as to how you would use that method with a tri-tip.  I know a lot of people love to reverse sear tri-tips, but given how long it takes to get a crust on it (at least 3 minutes per side), it seems the internal temp that you established during the first low phase is going to climb a lot more than reverse searing something like a rib eye.  Maybe that's why yours ended up slightly overdone for your taste.  I've always used the T Rex method with tri-tips.  Slather it in garlic rub and use red oak--that's the preferred wood for that cut of meat.  Really really amazing cut of meat when done right.
    Southern California
  • I just did my first tri tip last week as well. It was great! Living in Virginia, they are hard to come by and I had to order it from my butcher. People at the grocery store handed me a tip roast (not sure what it was but wasn't the tri tip cut.) Nevertheless, I I seasoned with a local rub called mad guapo, did a reverse sear and threw one chunk of mesquite on the fire. Pulled it 5 degrees below medium rare target and it was rock star. The thinner outer pieces were medium but the center was perfect. We sliced it thin, sautéed mushrooms and onions, toasted ciabatta buns, made a chipotle mayo, and made sandwiches out of it. I'm definitely looking forward to ordering another one.
    large and XL BGE in Richmond, VA
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,294
    edited February 18
    IMHO tri-tip needs to be slow roasted so, target for a 225º-250º at the grid level, indirect. This cook  temp allows the rub and any smoke wood to work its magic. Once the IT is at the 115º-120º mark, pull it, tent it, rest at room temps for at least 10 minutes. While waiting, open both another beer and the egg vents and change to a direct set-up on the fire ring. I usually look for at least 550º-600º dome. 
    To get the browning and flavourful Mailard reaction, the temp of the surface has to be dried and reach a temp of around 300º-325º. Many like a little char, but if the surface temp is taken over the 360º mark, you do don get browning and flavour, you get burning. 
    If there is significant moisture on the surface, dry it with a paper towel. Don't worry about removing rub, in fact you want to as anything other than mineral, salt, is going to burn when you start to pass thru the 360º range (or lower for some herbs) while searing. I think this is why many use a board sauce. You get the flavour of the meat and the added flavour of herbs and spices without burning them. 
    As @bicktrav notes, the sear will take too long and overcook the meat by the time you get the browning you want. The answer is not more heat, the answer is start with a drier surface. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 443
    @Skiddymarker - really interesting reply.  So if I'm understanding correctly, you're saying to pat the surface of the meat dry after the low heat phase is done and before the high heat sear begins, so that when you put it on for the sear the meat is totally dry.  That should allow you to reduce the sear time so that you reach 300-325 (the temp for the mailard reaction).  Is that right?  If so, how do you check the surface temp of the meat?  Also, do you pat-dry things like ribeyes when you're reverse searing too?
    Southern California
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,294
    edited February 18
    Yes, a dry surface will brown faster than a wet one. I wipe pretty much everything when I reverse sear. Although I usually use the egg, i tried pan searing a small grass fed tri-tip in my 12" skillet and it browned much faster. I don't check the surface temp of the meat, don't know how and don't think it is worth it (maybe use an IR thermo?). I just believe the science that says the reaction causing browning in meat exposed to high temps happens when searing takes the surface temp to just under 350º, and starts to burn (char) when over about 360º)
    Mailard reaction can happen at lower temps, it just takes longer. That's why briskets and pork butts get that great bark cooked at 250º. (the way I understand it and I might be totally full of it!) 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 443
    @Skiddymarker - Thanks, will definitely give everything you suggest a try during my next tri-tip cook.
    Southern California
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 443
    @Skiddymarker - Forgot to ask, do you keep the dome open during the sear or do you leave it closed? 
    Southern California
  • i did tri tip last week as well for the first time .
    I slow cooked it at 225 and then seared at the end .
    It was amazing . Cant wait to do it again
    Toronto
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,294
    bicktrav said:
    @Skiddymarker - Forgot to ask, do you keep the dome open during the sear or do you leave it closed? 
    @bicktrav - dome is closed for a single tri-tip. because the DFMT is off and the lower vent is open (usually about 1/2 way)  and the cook is direct, it is hotter with the lid closed than when it is open, the air flow is "chimneyed" through the centre of the egg. Acts kinda like a blast furnace. Lid open it is just a campfire. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Listen to Skiddy on this one...he's got it nailed. IMO

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

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