Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Beginner DSLR

I'm looking for a good beginner DSLR. I know there are some good photographers on this board. Any advise on a camera would be appreciated.
Nashville, Tennessee

Comments

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 8,808
    Letting us know your budget will be very helpful...
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • rconercone Posts: 116
    Canon or Nikon?
    LBGE, SBGE, Carson Rotisserie, Blackstone Griddle  

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
  • rcone said:
    Canon or Nikon?
    Nikon, of course. ;) 
    I'm Kristi ~ Live in FL ~ BGE since 2003.
    I write about food & travel on Necessary Indulgences.  
    You can also find me on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.
  • NecessaryIndulgNecessaryIndulg Posts: 1,242
    edited December 2013
    Hi @Mburrow1970 -- I'm not sure what your price range is, but I think the Nikon D3100 is a great place to start.  Here is a good article:  http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/recommended-cameras.htm
    I'm Kristi ~ Live in FL ~ BGE since 2003.
    I write about food & travel on Necessary Indulgences.  
    You can also find me on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 12,552
    cazzy said:

    Letting us know your budget will be very helpful...

    Yep. This is key. You also want to consider lenses in your budget. A really good teaching tool is a prime lens because you get to learn shutter speed and aperture quickly since zoom is taken out of the equation. Kit lenses are adequate for most stuff but a prime is much better for portraits and food shots(better bokeh).

    Many brands are more than adequate and the Canon vs. Nikon pissing contest comes down to personal preference. I'm a Canon person because Nikon is backwards to me(photographers will get it).

  • I bought my wife a Canon Rebel T3i last Christmas. She loves it! I think comparing Canon and Nikon is going to be like the Ford or Chevy argument. Ours came with the 18-55mm lens. It is a pretty good all purpose lens for getting started. I know nothing else. My wide is the artist and photographer.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • +1 on the T3i...I picked up a T4i last year just before Xmas too and they were very similar...in the end I liked the display on the T4i being a touch screen ...Nothing against Nikon, I just liked the Canon a little better...that being said, I know just about enough to be dangerous with it.

    Also +1 on the lens...I would suggest trying to figure out what you think you will use it for the most and find a camera store to walk you thru your best options.

    Within a week of owning it, I upgraded my lens to a Tamron variable 18-270mm.  While lens shopping and found a camera store who was was willing to give me some credit for the 18-55 that came with the camera...I shoot a lot of youth sports, so I wanted something that would handle the up close stuff and would also reach out across a field to get the plays.... I thought about getting the 300mm Canon, but didn't want to carry around extra equipment and with my luck I will always have the one I needed in the bag.

    Just like the egg, the camera is probably been one of my best investments...I have been extremely happy with the results it has produced.
    Making the neighbors jealous in Pleasant Hill, Ia one cook at a time...
  • cazzycazzy Posts: 8,808
    Letting us know your budget will be very helpful...
    Yep. This is key. You also want to consider lenses in your budget. A really good teaching tool is a prime lens because you get to learn shutter speed and aperture quickly since zoom is taken out of the equation. Kit lenses are adequate for most stuff but a prime is much better for portraits and food shots(better bokeh). Many brands are more than adequate and the Canon vs. Nikon pissing contest comes down to personal preference. I'm a Canon person because Nikon is backwards to me(photographers will get it).
    It's weird but took no time to get used to it.  

    I've had both systems, but sold my Canon T3i to Henapple and picked up a Nikon D600.  My suggestion to the OP is know what you want to shoot, and don't settle and buy something you don't really want.

    It took me a year to figure out what I enjoy shooting, and I'm thankful that I switched systems.  My Nikon 14-24mm incredible and I wouldn't be happy with what Canon has in the ultra-wide zoom range.
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • tksmoketksmoke Posts: 769

    +1 on knowing what you want to photograph!  Point and shoots have come a long way, and having something that you carry with you, rather than leave behind because it is sooooo bulky is a huge branch of the decision tree.  The better point and shoots now have all the features you will find in a good entry-level DSLR, and in many cases are easier to use.  They can also be used to make excellent photographs for someone who is willing to learn about all the elements of photography - light, depth of field, motion, subject, etc.

    I do a bit of adventure travel, and only bring my nice Nikon stuff occasionally because I hate to lug it around.  Of course when you really want a photograph, as opposed to a snapshot, there is no question what tool is best.

    Some of the new mirrorless full frame cameras are very tempting, but I haven't found one that has the kind of utility I'm looking for (yet...).  They do produce very nice images, and as the technology develops, will most likely be an outstanding alternative.

    Like the BGE, photography is a very slippery slope.  The initial purchase is the minimum part of the investment.

    Santa Paula, CA
  • Hungry JoeHungry Joe Posts: 1,240

    What ever you decide on remember you are buying into a system not just a camera. Which ever DSLR you buy most likely you will buy more then one lens and other equipment such as external flash and what not. All of which you will likely want to use when you upgrade the body after you learn a little more. 

    I've always liked Canon but that is mainly because it is what I started with. Which one to start with is a personal decision. Your best bet is to go to a store hold the different cameras and see what feels good in your hands. Look at the button layout and see which one makes the most sense to you. All of this will make what ever system you buy more user friendly to yourself.

Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.