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room temp before putting pork shoulder on?

egginctegginct Posts: 2
What temp should the shoulder be before i put it on the egg?  I have done several long smokes and cant seem to get the thing anywhere near 185 degrees.  Its fully cooked but just very difficult to pull.  I've been cooking at 225 for upwards of 1.5 hrs per pound- the shoulder is usually somewhere in the 50-55 degree range when i put it on.  Should i have it closer to 70?

Comments

  • DMWDMW Posts: 4,882
    If 225* is your dome temp, bump it to 250*.
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632
    I put mine on straight out of the fridge, but I go 250 grate level or around 275 dome. No real reason to go for that "mythical" temp of 225 unless you just have a lot of time on your hands. You are'nt going to get it to pull at 185, I don't even try to do the wiggle the bone test until its at least 195, but have taken them to 205 before.

    Richardson, Texas

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  • awesome thanks- also- i'm using a digiq- where does everyone think the best location for the pit probe is?  I've been leaving it right on the grate, usually splitting the difference between that temp and the dome temp.  any suggestions?  
  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 6,618
    edited November 2013
    Opinions are like @$$#0/e$ everybody has got one. This is a hot topic for pork, beef, poultry, etc etc. We all temp our product before taking off the egg for doneness and more importantly food safety. This practice begins from the time you pick it from your butcher or grocery store. I say this because unless you slaughter your own hog, cow etc this is all you can control. http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/the-big-thaw-safe-defrosting-methods-for-consumers/CT_Index. Take directly from refrigerator to egg. The longer the product sits out the more bacteria can multiply. I to have heard this theory of letting meat get to "room temp". Bad idea.
    LBGE 2012, Mini MAX 2014, SS Table and Stoker
    Die Hard HUSKER and BRONCO FAN
    Middleburg, FL
  • egginct I have been putting my pit probe on the spring that holds the dome thermometer and that seems to work fine for me I have done numerous shoulders or butts cooked at 225 pit temp and took off at 195 then FTC (Foli towel cooler) for about 1 1/2 hours and it pulls fine and tastes great 
    2 Large Eggs and a Mini 2 Pit Bulls and a Pork shoulder or butt nearby and 100% SICILIAN
    Long Island N.Y.
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,632
    I clip mine about an inch away from the meat or split the difference between the meat and the edge of the platesetter/ stone on the AR. Too close to the meat and you will get false readings from the cold meat. When watching the temp from a probe at the grate level, I totally ignore the dome temp. Looking at both will just cause confusion and make you scratch your head as you try to figure out which one to go by when they don't agree.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 6,618
    Perhaps I'm confused on your question. I read it as though you were inquiring whether you should allow the meat temp to go to "room temp" before placing on egg. If so... http://www.amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/mythbusting_letting_meat_come_to_room_temp.html
    LBGE 2012, Mini MAX 2014, SS Table and Stoker
    Die Hard HUSKER and BRONCO FAN
    Middleburg, FL
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,089
    edited November 2013
    Meat right out of the fridge is easier to handle, slather and rub, IMHO. Food probe reads in the 40-45ºF range. No need to bring it up to room temp. Best butts are cooked at 275 dome, starting around 250 grid, the grid temp will come closer to dome over the cook time. No need for a stoker, unless you like to play with gadgets. 
    225 will take way too long to get to a 195-205 meat temp, IMO. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Bump up the temperature.  It takes me about 10-12 hours to cook a 8-9lb shoulder at 250* (Depending on time, I might bump it up close to 275*) dome temperature.  You can do a pork shoulder at 225* but it is not really going to gain you anything.  They are very forgiving.  I have let it set out for a few hours before and I have put them right on out of the refrigerator.  I cannot tell a difference (others may, but I have cannot so take that for what it is worth). 
  • GATravellerGATraveller Posts: 740
    edited November 2013

     

    Meat right out of the fridge is easier to handle, slather and rub, IMHO. Food probe reads in the 40-45ºF range. No need to bring it up to room temp. Best butts are cooked at 275 dome, starting around 250 grid, the grid temp will come closer to dome over the cook time. No need for a stoker, unless you like to play with gadgets. 
    225 will take way too long to get to a 195-205 meat temp, IMO. 
    @Skiddymarker Why does is a long time bad??
    "Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees." 
    -Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson

    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,340
    The closer the grate/dome temp is to your finish time the slower it will raise at the end.  If your dome is 225, grate is probably 200.  I usually pull at 200 - you won't get there at that temp.

    Lately I  have been cooking turbo.  When I have done L&S, once I hit the stall, I open up the vents and raise the temp to 300 to get it finished.  The pork always gets raves.

    Also, once you get over 140, I don't think you get any more smoke flavor.  I would adjust the temp to finish at my convenience.  200 IT is 200 IT.
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
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