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Best rice for use in a rice cooker?

Any recomendations from the knowledgeable? I plan to go to the asian or indian market to pick up a large bag and want to get something higher quality with simple rice cooker preparation. I heard that Jasmine and Basmati taste good. Unfortunately this one sentence about sums up all I know.

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Comments

  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 7,861
    I have cooked many different rices and pilafs in rice cookers, even brown rice.  I prefer jasmine for its sweet flavor and basmati for same plus basmati is more puffy.  Just depends what I am having with the rest of the meal. 
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  • HibbyHibby Posts: 456
    Dynasty brand Jasmine Rice is really fantastic. Can you find better rice? In Asian markets I'm sure you could but you'd need advice as to which to buy. The Jasmine rice is flavorful and smells great while cooking in my Zojirushi.
    Conservative stalwart in Thornville, Ohio
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  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,295
    It depends on the meal you are cooking. For most of my rice-based dishes, I use short or medium grain. They are harder to find for me and typically more expensive. A sack of Basmati from Costco is great.
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  • Basmati is good but requires thorough rinsing to come up fluffy. Add a teaspoon of cumin seeds for a nice twist. My wife is cleared on the rice cooker, not me, but she rinses all the varieties really well.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • jlsmjlsm Posts: 848
    I also soak my brown rice for at least an hour. It takes less time and turns out perfect. 
    *******
    Owner of a large and a beloved mini in Philadelphia
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  • GATravellerGATraveller Posts: 1,474
    If you are looking for your rice to be a bit sticky then wash the grains in cold water until they rinse clean before putting in steamer.  This was taught to me by my Japanese/Hawaiian neighbor.  Works perfectly.
    "Let us cross over the river, and rest under the shade of the trees." 
    -Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson

    Peachtree Corners, GA
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,964
    edited November 2013
    Different kinds of rice have different flavors. Basmati is good for many dishes, but is sort of a luxury - typically used for biryani, pulao, etc. not eaten everyday in most Indian households. We used to eat jasmine rice for our "everyday" rice but it worked better with fish curries than goat or chicken curries. Basmati worked better with goat or chicken, most likely because of the way the curry was prepared.

    Also note that different types of rice need different quantities of water to cook. It might take some trial and error with your rice cooker, but your rice cooker should be able to cook just about any type of rice properly. Having said that, most of the rice cookers in Asian stores are Japanese or Chinese made, so I wonder if the cookers are engineered to cook short or medium grain rice better. Rinse the rice well as mentioned above - swirl your fingers through the rice when rinsing, don't crush it. 

    We used to buy Longevity brand Thai jasmine rice. Costco usually has the best price for basmati. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 4,653
    edited November 2013
    As caliking said, we use basmati for special dishes like biryani, pulao/pilaf.  For everyday use, Ox Head brand is very popular with Asians. If your rice cooker has non-stick surface, avoid rinsing rice in it vigorously. Actually nowadays we eat California brown rice mostly. 
    canuckland
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  • Ok, this has struck a chord with me. Rice hates me. I cannot, no matter what I do, get Basmati rice to come out nice and fluffy where each grain is separate (like you get at an Indian restaurant) using a Rice Cooker. I've gone through two models and my latest (recommended by an Asian guy I know) still does not give me what I want.

    So for Basmati rice, do I:

    1. Rinse until water runs clear?
    2. Soak, then rinse until clear?
    3. Some other magic bullet?
    4. Do I use the measuring cup supplied with the unit? If so, for both rice and water? One fluid cup does not equal one dry cup.

    Thanks!

    In the  Hinterlands between Cumming and Gainesville, GA
    Med BGE, Weber Kettle, Weber Smokey Joe, Brinkman Dual Zone, Weber Genesis Gas Grill and portable gasser for boating
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  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,320
    edited November 2013
    Usually they have markings on the canister for water, If it's like mine the measuring cup doesn't equal anything. Canugghead just warned against over rinsing. I was told by an Indian chef to rinse it in a sieve until the water is completely clear.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 1,297

    I like Basmati.

    Costco sells big bags of it for a good price, as does Sam's in a burlap bag.  My favorite is Tilda in a shiny blue plastic bag.  It's twice as expensive and hard to find, but taste so much better.

    http://amzn.com/B00269WUTC

    I don't have a rice cooker, I just use a sauce pan.  1.5x water to rice, olive oil, and salt.  Bring to a boil, let the water level drop below the top of the rice, then cover and low heat for 20 minutes.

    Connect:  Website  -  Facebook  -  Twitter

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  • Thanks Little Steven. I've tried to boil the rice in 1/2 gal of water and then drain with a sieve. Works OK but more PIA than I would like. I'll double check the sides but I don't remember seeing any lines for amounts.
    In the  Hinterlands between Cumming and Gainesville, GA
    Med BGE, Weber Kettle, Weber Smokey Joe, Brinkman Dual Zone, Weber Genesis Gas Grill and portable gasser for boating
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,964
    edited November 2013
    @Cymbaline65 - No worries. This is what usually works for me (basmati rice):

    Rinse desired quantity of rice until the water is clear (3-4 times). Swirl your fingers through it when you fill the water to agitate it a little.

    Fill the pot with water until the rice is covered. Level the surface of the rice and measure the level of the water from the top of the rice (not the bottom of the pot). Measure by sticking your finger in the water until the tip of your index finger just barely touches the surface of the rice. The water should come up to the first crease/joint of your index finger (palmar surface, distal interphalangeal joint).

    Start boiling the uncovered pot on high heat, until the water and rice come to a rolling boil. Stir the pot well so that no rice is stuck to the bottom. 

    Turn the heat down to medium-low, and cover the pot. Crack the lid a bit so the rice doesn't boil over.

    After 7 or so mins the rice should be aromatic. Test a few grains to see if they are done, If done, then turn off the heat, take the pot off the burner. 

    Fluff up the rice with a serving spoon or whatever. Place a kitchen towel overthe pot and put the lid back on.Let it rest for 20mins before serving.


    Some folks add some oil/butter/ghee  +/- salt to the rice while it boils. Its not necessary, but does help to keep the rice grains from sticking to each other. 


    YMMV. This is what works in my kitchen :)


    PS. Microwave also works well for basmati. Take a large tupperware kind of bowl. Rinse the rice and measure the water as above. Nuke for 12-15 mins, pausing midway to give the rice a good stir. watch for boil overs. Fluff the rice, place a towel over it, cover for 20mins as above. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 17,123
    jasmain and zararains dirty rice are my only go to's. but then again  i grew up making ricaroni sandwiches
    :D
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  • hondabbqhondabbq Posts: 1,218

    I love using sushi rice. I love the texture and flavor it brings to most dishes. I use Kokuho Rose exclusively.  If we are talking about following rules of ethnic cuisines then I am not the guy to follow.

     I make rice pudding with sushi and make it tin the oven over a couple of hours. No real recipe just adding milk or cream as it gets drier until cooked.

     

    Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    Welcome to the wonderful world of Motley Brew.

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  • Great write up, Caliking. Thankfully you went into layman's terms for palmar surface, distal interphalangeal joint. Otherwise, I would have been lost.

    :))

    I think the towel idea is sound too. I'll give it a rip and report back results.

    Thanks!!!

    In the  Hinterlands between Cumming and Gainesville, GA
    Med BGE, Weber Kettle, Weber Smokey Joe, Brinkman Dual Zone, Weber Genesis Gas Grill and portable gasser for boating
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  • Thanks Little Steven. I've tried to boil the rice in 1/2 gal of water and then drain with a sieve. Works OK but more PIA than I would like. I'll double check the sides but I don't remember seeing any lines for amounts.
    No you want all  the water to be absorbed by the rice. This happens largely after the heat is removed. I usually salt the water too. When I do basmati, I use less than a 1-2 ratio, maybe 1 to 1 3/4

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 4,653
    edited November 2013
    Thanks Little Steven. I've tried to boil the rice in 1/2 gal of water and then drain with a sieve. Works OK but more PIA than I would like. I'll double check the sides but I don't remember seeing any lines for amounts.
    I think LS meant rinsing BEFORE cooking. With automatic rice cooker (since OP mentioned using a rice cooker), there's no liquid left when done. Key to non-lumping rice:  When the cooker finishes cooking and kicks into keep warm mode, let it rest for about 15 minutes before you fluff it.  After fluffing, let it rest again, still covered, before serving. It's okay to unplug the cooker during second rest.
    canuckland
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  • Thanks Little Steven. I've tried to boil the rice in 1/2 gal of water and then drain with a sieve. Works OK but more PIA than I would like. I'll double check the sides but I don't remember seeing any lines for amounts.
    No you want all  the water to be absorbed by the rice. This happens largely after the heat is removed. I usually salt the water too. When I do basmati, I use less than a 1-2 ratio, maybe 1 to 1 3/4
    Right, I put in a ton of water and just boil until tender, drain and serve.
    In the  Hinterlands between Cumming and Gainesville, GA
    Med BGE, Weber Kettle, Weber Smokey Joe, Brinkman Dual Zone, Weber Genesis Gas Grill and portable gasser for boating
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  • @caliking...funny, you take.me back to my grandmother, thats the way she taught us to make rice out of a pot
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  • Thanks Little Steven. I've tried to boil the rice in 1/2 gal of water and then drain with a sieve. Works OK but more PIA than I would like. I'll double check the sides but I don't remember seeing any lines for amounts.
    I think LS meant rinsing BEFORE cooking. With automatic rice cooker (since OP mentioned using a rice cooker), there's no liquid left when done. Key to non-lumping rice:  When the cooker finishes cooking and kicks into keep warm mode, let it rest for about 15 minutes before you fluff it.  After fluffing, let it rest again, still covered, before serving. It's okay to unplug the cooker during second rest.

    Good advice Canugghead. I try both traditional with towel and cooker. Let SWMBO decide which she prefers.


     

    In the  Hinterlands between Cumming and Gainesville, GA
    Med BGE, Weber Kettle, Weber Smokey Joe, Brinkman Dual Zone, Weber Genesis Gas Grill and portable gasser for boating
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,964
    @Bustersdad - that's how my mom and uncle (her brother) taught me to cook rice. She never measured anything!

    The towel over the pot during the rest is for absorbing water from the steam. Otherwise it condenses on the lid and drips back into the cooked rice. 

    Some types of rice are required to be cooked in heaps of water and then drained before serving. You can do this with basmati and jasmine - a lot of the starch drains out with the water so the rice becomes lower in starch (low-er carb?), but the rice stays somewhat wet, and its not the preferred method for cooking basmati or jasmine. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • My wife is Asian and buys Kohoku Rose rice and cooks it in a Zojirushi rice cooker.  It always comes out great, with little effort other than a short rinse on the rice before cooking.
    See der Rabbits, Iowa
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  • Holy geez, who would have thought? Tons of great info here. 
    Most Asians we know, Taiwan/Japan/Korea, use short to medium grain rice. it tends to be sticky when finished, as they eat it with chop sticks from a bowl so the more it clumps the easier is is to eat. For most of us in the knife/fork/spoon crowd, we tend to go for longer grain less sticky rice. 
    Aromatics, jasmine and basmati, can be quite good if paired correctly with the right foods. Basmati is our favourite for pilaf (onion and butter saute with rice dried after a good rinse then finished with 2:1 chicken broth to rice). Even our Asian friends like this a change. 
    Depending on the brand, short grain rice can vary from a 1-1/4 cups to 2 cups of water for each cup of rice, only experience will tell you what is right with your cooker. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 1,297

    I make a cilantro lime rice to service with Mexican food.

    I substitute chicken broth (not stock) for half of the water, then add the zest and juice from 3-4 limes. Cook it the normal way, then finish it with some additional lime juice and fresh cilantro.  Don't skimp on the lime zest and juice--you need a ton of it, or you'll never even taste it.

    Connect:  Website  -  Facebook  -  Twitter

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  • @stlcharcoal - how much cilantro? Sounds great, have been looking for a rice to accompany Mexican style foods. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,567
    edited November 2013
    All his talk today and no one has mentioned my favorite rice...Forbidden Rice aka Black Rice. Besides tasting rich the black color makes an interesting presentation on your plate. imageimage
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • @stlcharcoal - how much cilantro? Sounds great, have been looking for a rice to accompany Mexican style foods. 
    When I do Mexican I use the spicy Clamatto with cumin, oregano, garlic, ancho powder and some chopped chipoltles. Usually a few chopped peppers and onions. Sometimes I'll cut the Clamatto with chicken stock. Stir in chopped coriander at the end

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • RRPRRP Posts: 15,567
    edited November 2013
    For a professional electrician you sure know a lot about food...as usual I'm impressed with your creativity and vast culinary knowledge!
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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  • I am not a very good electrician really

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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