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New guy here - reverse sear

Hey everyone.  Had my egg for a week and got chicken breasts, turbo butt, and pizza checked off the list.  I've been very successful so far thanks to the site.  Next is steak.  I've searched on how to reverse sear a filet, and was wondering if someone could give me a quick run down of main events, times, and temps of getting the best steak possible.

Thanks!!

Charleston, SC

Comments

  • DMWDMW Posts: 4,481
    edited October 2013
    Basically cook at around 250* indirect until IT is about 15* below target. Then pull the steaks and rest while you take the egg to 700* for a sear about 90 sec per side. Pull the platesetter before going nuclear. Also, might want to do some more low temp cooks before you take it that high, otherwise you could be sacrificing you gasket.
    My Facebook Place where I document my cooking
    Morgantown, PA

    XL BGE, Small BGE, Kenmore Gas Grill, Blackstone Patio/Pizza Oven, 30" Steel Fire Pit w/Cooking Grid
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 9,557
    Like DMW said. Also, depending on how high your lump is in the fire box/ring or if you can lower your grid closer to the lump, you can sear at a lower temp of 550-600. This is a bit easier to control than full blast furnace.
  • The first, and most important, step in getting the best steak possible is selecting the right steaks. 

    Flavor comes from the fat so you probably want to consider something like ribeye, new york strip or t-bone. My personal favorite is a bone-in ribeye. I never buy anything less than an inch thick which means you may have to ask the butcher to cut some for you. Reverse sear is a great method for cooking a thick steak and get the exact doneness that you want; which should never be anything over medium rare.

    Finally, a really good steak should not require any more in the way of seasoning than salt and (maybe) a little pepper.

    Enjoy, and remember, pics or it didn't happen.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • I appreciate the talking points!  As for the gasket, I've already had her cranked up to 650* for pizza.  I plan on replacing it with an upgraded one soon anyways.  I have a great butcher I've gone to for years-great steaks and always had good results on my gasser, so I'm sure the egg will take it to the next level.  I love a big fat strip and the old lady likes her filet.  
    Cheers
    Charleston, SC
  • A reverse sear is the only way to do a Sous Vide steak.  We had one last night, and it was great.  Cooked it for 24 hours at 135, then to the Mini with a killer flame going and pecan chips.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • bettysnephewbettysnephew Posts: 811
    edited October 2013
    I think it was skiddymarker ( if not, my apologies to the genius that thought this up) that mentioned several years back to place the cast iron grid under the plate setter when prepping for a reverse sear.  The CI is then preheated by the coals and the steak can be cooked on the regular grid indirect until desired doneness -15° or so.  Set the steak aside and let it rest while removing the SS grid and plate setter with the bottom door and daisy wheel taken off.  In just a couple of minutes the CI grid will be ready for that final sear.  This method works as well as any I have tried and saves quite a bit of time between steps.
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  • OOPS, bottom door open in above post.
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
  • Awesome. I'll be giving it a shot this weekend when my shift rotation is done. Thanks again everyone!!
    Charleston, SC
  • 3sheets3sheets Posts: 81
    I think it was skiddymarker ( if not, my apologies to the genius that thought this up) that mentioned several years back to place the cast iron grid under the plate setter when prepping for a reverse sear.  The CI is then preheated by the coals and the steak can be cooked on the regular grid indirect until desired doneness -15° or so.  Set the steak aside and let it rest while removing the SS grid and plate setter with the bottom door and daisy wheel taken off.  In just a couple of minutes the CI grid will be ready for that final sear.  This method works as well as any I have tried and saves quite a bit of time between steps.
    I do my reverse sear in one setup with a half moon plate and a half raised grate. Nothing to remove but the meat.
    2013-09-08 13.52.22.jpg
    2560 x 1920 - 1M

    Location 33.537588, -83.969298 (33.5 miles and 41 minutes SE of the Mothership)

  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,998
    edited October 2013
    @bettysnephew, it was me, nice to be thought of as a genius - wait 'till I show SWMBO! Thanks. 

    I use my ash tool and channel locks to lift the setter out so I put some ceramic scrap tile strips between the CI and the setter. Provides just enough space to get the ash tool and pliers under to lift the setter off. 

    @steelmover07 - good luck with the reverse sear. If you notice puddles of moisture on your steaks after the rest and before the sear, dab with a paper towel to hurry the browning and create char. The Maillard reaction cannot occur until the surface moisture is gone. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • @skiddymarker - I appreciate it.  I'll have plenty more questions as I want to try new things out.  Seems hard to not make anything good on this thing!  The wife loves not cooking haha
    Charleston, SC
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,998
    3sheets said:
    I think it was skiddymarker ( if not, my apologies to the genius that thought this up) that mentioned several years back to place the cast iron grid under the plate setter when prepping for a reverse sear.  The CI is then preheated by the coals and the steak can be cooked on the regular grid indirect until desired doneness -15° or so.  Set the steak aside and let it rest while removing the SS grid and plate setter with the bottom door and daisy wheel taken off.  In just a couple of minutes the CI grid will be ready for that final sear.  This method works as well as any I have tried and saves quite a bit of time between steps.
    I do my reverse sear in one setup with a half moon plate and a half raised grate. Nothing to remove but the meat.
    Good idea, use the same technique if only doing one or two steaks. I kinda have to use the setter approach if doing four or five steaks - not that much real estate on a medium. I cut an old 15" pizza stone down to use as a half moon. 
    Reverse sear set-up.jpg
    4288 x 2848 - 477K
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 12,144
    You probably already know this... BURP THE EGG.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • ahh yes.  Doing pizza the other night i could tell it could it could turn out to be a bad night....good meal, but minus some eyebrows and arm hair.
    Charleston, SC
  • Here's the results.  It was amazing and pretty simple with ya'lls help.
    image.jpg
    3264 x 2448 - 2M
    Charleston, SC
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