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Slow cook Tri Tip? Suggestions?

Hi I'm going to be making tri tip sandwiches and need the meat to be VERY tender.  I'm marinading for 2 days in fridge and am thinking about slow cooking it at 300deg or so until med rare internal temp.  Normally I sear and then take off and then slow cook it.

Thoughts?

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,790
    If you have the equipment, you could sous vide the tri-tip for 48 hours at 135F.  Ice it down, then sear back up to 130 IT.
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,790
    It's a cooking technique I use frequently prior to cooking on the egg.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sous-vide
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,030
    Slow cooking a lean cut like tri tip will make a hockey puck.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • I highly recommend the Travis method for tri tip. There are lots of good ways to cook this cut, but the Travis Style braise is Damn near fool proof in my experience. Give it a go.

    Cheers,
    B_B
    Badger at heart, living in SoCal

    Carlsbad, CA
  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 662
    Slow cooking a lean cut like tri tip will make a hockey puck.
    Little Steven I respectfully disagree. Tri tips, even though they are not a fatty cut of meat, they are far from a tender cut. IMHO they benefit from low and slow. I like to cook them direct at about 250 to 275, fat cap left on and fat cap down. I cook them to 135 internal. I probably cook at least two a month and I always have one in the freezer since the are a regularly on sale in this area.      
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • I've decided to do a reverse sear.  Indirect dome temp ~300 deg until internal temp is ~110deg then sear until internal temp 135deg
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 26,030
    td66snrf said:
    Slow cooking a lean cut like tri tip will make a hockey puck.
    Little Steven I respectfully disagree. Tri tips, even though they are not a fatty cut of meat, they are far from a tender cut. IMHO they benefit from low and slow. I like to cook them direct at about 250 to 275, fat cap left on and fat cap down. I cook them to 135 internal. I probably cook at least two a month and I always have one in the freezer since the are a regularly on sale in this area.     
    I just assumed it was. I've never cooked one per se but have tried several bottom sirloin roasts as well as a lot of top sirloin. Guess I have to try again. Apologies for bad advice.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Learning to SmokeLearning to Smoke Posts: 69
    edited October 2013
    I highly recommend the Travis method for tri tip. There are lots of good ways to cook this cut, but the Travis Style braise is Damn near fool proof in my experience. Give it a go.

    Cheers,
    B_B
    What IT temp do you take the tri trip to when you do the Travis Method?  

    Thanks. 
  • I've cooked tri-tips for years, it's actually my go-to beef roast. I use a rub on it, pat it with oil, and cook it raised direct at 325-350°. I turn it once as it seems to be self searing! It takes less than 30 minutes, depending on the size of the piece.

    Now I cut the raw meat in half and freeze the other half, so I don't have to eat it for a whole week. I get two or three meals out of a half. That only takes about 15 minutes to cook.

    Cut that rosy pink interior across the grain and it's heavenly and juicy. I have never ONCE had a less-than-perfect outcome.
    Judy in San Diego
  • LitLit Posts: 2,374
    If you are doing sandwiches I would pre slice the tri tip in under quarter inch slices then marinate and then set your egg up for searing and cook them like 15-20 seconds per side. Works really well for sandwiches and is more tender than when its cooked as a whole. I just finished slicing 2 up and putting them in the food saver quick marinator with hoison/teriyaki sauce. I am gonna sear mine on the salt block but on the grate works fine. Whenever I cook them this way they disappear as they come off the egg they never make it to sandwiches. If you are gonna try this throw them in the freezer for 30 prior to slicing it makes it much easier.
  • LitLit Posts: 2,374
    Also for the low and slow I know where I am its hard to find tri tips with fat caps. There is only one place I know of that sells them with the cap. I have tried them low and slow and am not a fan I think they come out better cooked like a steak.
  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 662
    edited October 2013
    Lit said:
    Also for the low and slow I know where I am its hard to find tri tips with fat caps. There is only one place I know of that sells them with the cap. I have tried them low and slow and am not a fan I think they come out better cooked like a steak.

    Lit,

    That's ironic because around here you can't find them without a fat cap. The grocers love selling you the fat at the price of the meat. Here's an add from my favorite SoCal chain for meat.

     http://staterbros.com/TopMenu/Weekly-Ad.aspx   GO TO PAGE TWO

    When they're advertised as "trimmed" that means the top fat has been removed but you can bet it will have a fat cap.


     

    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • @Learning to Smoke, I cook tri tip to a much higher temp doing Travis than I do if I'm reverse searing or something like that. For hot and fast I go 134, for Travis I go to 195. Tri tip seems to have enough connective tissue to not fall apart at the higher temp, and it does get more tender (although slicing thin and against the grain is still a must).
    Badger at heart, living in SoCal

    Carlsbad, CA
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