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OT: Making Beef Stock

If you are not making your own beef stock and chicken stock, you are really missing out.
I guarantee you will never buy another can or box from the store again.

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Dripping Springs, Texas.
Gateway to the Hill Country

Comments

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,041
    so what do you have in there, i see celery carrots bay. are you buying the bones or taking them off something.  of all the canned stocks beef is the worst, tastes like dog food to me if its canned
  • @fishlessman - "tastes like dog food to me if its canned" you are being far to kind! 

    For less than a year have made my own. Rib bones cut from a rib roast. Use the Modernist Cuisine method, excellent. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • so what do you have in there, i see celery carrots bay. are you buying the bones or taking them off something.  of all the canned stocks beef is the worst, tastes like dog food to me if its canned
    @Austinegghead put me on to a cool meat market in Hutto TX (I'm new to these parts).  I bought 2 boxes of beef bones (10 pounds in each box) for $5.00 per box.  Here is the recipe I use.  I think it's very good. It's Emeril's recipe.  The recipe calls for 7 pounds of bones.  I had 10, so I upped the water from 1.5 gallons to 2 gallons.

    Ingredients:

    7  pounds Beef bones, Sawed into 2 inch pieces

    1 can Tomato paste

    2 cups Onions, chopped

    1 cup Carrots, chopped

    1 cup Celery, chopped

    2 cups Wine, dry red

    20 Peppercorns, black

    5 cloves Garlic, peeled

    5 Bay leaves

    1 teaspoon Thyme, dried, leaf

    1.5 gallons Water

    Directions:

    1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

    2. Place the bones on a roasting pan and roast for 1 hour. Remove from the oven and brush with the tomato paste. Lay the vegetables over the bones. Return to the oven and roast for 30 minutes. Place the pan on the stove and deglaze with the wine, scraping the bottom of the pan for browned particles. Put this mixture in a large stock pot. Add the peppercorns, garlic, and herbs. Season with salt. Bring the liquid up to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Cook for 4 hours. Remove from the heat and skim off any fat that has risen to the surface. Strain the liquid and discard the bones.


    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,041
    @fishlessman - "tastes like dog food to me if its canned" you are being far to kind! 

    For less than a year have made my own. Rib bones cut from a rib roast. Use the Modernist Cuisine method, excellent. 
    my favorite for gravey making is lamb stock, when i make a traditional shepards pie with lamb i try to make extra for the freezer, really rich. stock from a hambone for soups is another good reason to make the occassional ham. my grandmothers secret for good vegatable soup was a hambone
    :))
  • @Village_Idiot - very similar to MC method, other than MC uses a pressure cooker for +2 hours rather than a stock pot for 4 hours. I use my egg for the oven roast, do you?

    @fishlessman - Mom's vegetable soup was based on the use of the same hambone back bone. Never tried lamb bones. Around our house, lamb is pretty much limited to lamb chops. I suppose after eating the "T" bones could always end up in the pressure cooker. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • @skiddymarker  No, I use the oven.  The reason is that I don't want to introduce any smoky flavor to the stock because I don't know what I am going to make with it.  Once, I made chicken stock from a chicken I had roasted on the Egg.  Later, I used the stock for some wonton soup.  That was not the flavor I wanted in the soup.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,041
    thanks VI, need to start talking to some butcher about the bones, seems supermarkets that always had them are buying differently and you just dont see them anymore
  • @skiddymarker  No, I use the oven.  The reason is that I don't want to introduce any smoky flavor to the stock because I don't know what I am going to make with it.  Once, I made chicken stock from a chicken I had roasted on the Egg.  Later, I used the stock for some wonton soup.  That was not the flavor I wanted in the soup.
    We usually use the broth for au jus base or gravy so the smoke has not been an issue. Have some beef bones in the freezer, will try the oven on the next cool day. Thanks!
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • IMHO you get a much more velvety stock using veal bones. Using a bouqet garni (herbs in cheesecloth) on a string in the stock for an hour makes it easier to get a clear stock. Salt doesn't typically go in a stock. I usually start veal stock in the evening and let it slow simmer overnight. If you don't roast the bones, you blanch them for five minutes in boiling water to remove impurities, then rinse and start in a clean pot using the mirepoix and tomato paste and herbs you get a really nice light or lis stock. This is true of any stock. After making the stock, you can use the bones again to make a weaker stock called remoulliage

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,260
    I needed to cook low sodium soup for a convalescing relative,  and so learned how much salt was in commercial broths and soups. !! Not long after that, I started making my own stock, and, if at all possible, never use commercial any more.

    In fact, today being rather cool, I've got a PC loaded w. pork neck bones and mirepoix right now, which will merge w. a gel I made from jowl bacon rind.

    Typically, I freeze whatever bones I can remove or salvage from different meals, and make stock when I have a pot full.
  • @Little Steven I agree with the salt.  It's in the recipe because it's Emeril's recipe verbatim.  I don't add any salt to my stock.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • @Little Steven I agree with the salt.  It's in the recipe because it's Emeril's recipe verbatim.  I don't add any salt to my stock.
    So you disagree with everything else I said? I don't type very fast and that was a lot of work. Jus de vieux lis pal.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,947
    edited September 2013
    Actually, I like what you said.  But, I don't know where I'd get veal bones (we like heavy beef in Texas).  I know you just posted to show the world what a dickhead I am, but I do value your opinion.  I always print out your wisdom and keep it in a folder.   :x
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 1,738

    " I always print out your wisdom and keep it in a folder. "

    And he keep the folder on his desk right under the life-sized poster of you that hangs on his wall for inspiration. 

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • Foghorn said:

    " I always print out your wisdom and keep it in a folder. "

    And he keep the folder on his desk right under the life-sized poster of you that hangs on his wall for inspiration. 

    I'll autograph that for you if you want. Life size isn't all that big
    :(

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Actually, I like what you said.  But, I don't know where I'd get veal bones (we like heavy beef in Texas).  I know you just posted to show the world what a dickhead I am, but I do value your opinion.  I always print out your wisdom and keep it in a folder.   :x
    You might be able to get them from an Italian market if you have any of those.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,791
    Evidently ya'll have way more time than I do... Village Idiot... I'll buy some.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • henapple said:
    Evidently ya'll have way more time than I do... Village Idiot... I'll buy some.
    It doesn't really take a lot of time. Try doing it at night, strain and cool in the morning.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • This is an old post for turkey stock. Same procedure just less time and no tomato paste.

    Start with turkey parts necks, backs and wings.
    image
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    Roast the parts at about 350* until golden
    image
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    Add mirepoix, two parts onion to one each carrot and celery
    image
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    Roast until mirepoix is caramelised and bird parts are very dark.
    image
    Remove the stuff to a stockpot, I'm using a large pasta pot cause I like the strainer. and cover with cold water
    image
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    Now your roasting pans are going to look like this
    image
    Add a bunch of decent white wine and boil and scrape the brown bits off.
    image
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    Pour into the stock, get everything
    image
    Put some herbs in a double layer of cheesecloth, great way to use the stalks and stems
    image
    Tie with butcher twine and tuck it into the mix. I pull thiis out after an hour or so.
    image
    This will simmer for six or seven hours, I'll pull out the strainer and put the pot on a snowbank overnight.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,791
    edited September 2013


    henapple said:

    Evidently ya'll have way more time than I do... Village Idiot... I'll buy some.

    It doesn't really take a lot of time. Try doing it at night, strain and cool in the morning.


    Ok... I'll buy some from you...
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,599
    edited September 2013
    I've never made beef or veal stock, but I have used Alton Brown's method for chicken stock.  He claims that you need to bring the heat up very slowly, and never go above a bare simmer, because faster heat seals off some pores in the bones and doesn't allow collagen to leech out first.
    I had my doubts but made a pot, put it into the snowbank to cool, and then into the frig.  The next day it had completely gelled!  It had the best mouthfeel ever, and I was sold after that.  
     
    EDIT:  Ain't EweTube great?  Good Eats
    _____________________________________________
     
    I Know Why The Egged Bird Sings.
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • Botch said:
    I've never made beef or veal stock, but I have used Alton Brown's method for chicken stock.  He claims that you need to bring the heat up very slowly, and never go above a bare simmer, because faster heat seals off some pores in the bones and doesn't allow collagen to leech out first.
    I had my doubts but made a pot, put it into the snowbank to cool, and then into the frig.  The next day it had completely gelled!  It had the best mouthfeel ever, and I was sold after that.  
    Good point. After you blanch or roast the bones start with ice cold water and set to a simmer and let the stock come up slowly.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • MickeyMickey Posts: 14,541
    Play nice everyone. Remember everyone at Salado will be packing under the kilts.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • If you really want to treat yourself, go find some VEAL bones...
    "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are."
     Brillat-Savarin
  • Kilts?  Veal?

    I'm outtta here.  
    [-X
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,791
    Mickey said:

    Play nice everyone. Remember everyone at Salado will be packing under the kilts.

    Some less than others...
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,791
    Did someone say Blanche?
    images.jpeg
    130 x 150 - 4K
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,599
    I just watched that Good Eats episode, and he mentions that younger animals have more collagen in their bones than their elders; that's why veal stock is so good, as a few above have mentioned.  
    _____________________________________________
     
    I Know Why The Egged Bird Sings.
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,791
    Ok... This Blanche is better.
    k-bigpic.jpg
    340 x 572 - 76K
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
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