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Granite or Paver?

I have started building a table for my two eggs and I have a question as I continue to look at pics of tables that have been posted on here. I can't decide on whether I want to put granite or a paver under the eggs. Do they both have the same ability to handle the heat from the bottom of the egg? I don't want to consider granite if it lets the wood get too hot. Any experiences or thoughts you can share? Thanks!

Comments

  • Not sure about granite, but I know the concrete pavers work well.  I know that you shouldn't use things like household tile because it gets too hot and will eventually crack.  I'd stick with the paver.....cheaper and is known to do the job.

    LBGE

    Cedar table w/granite top

    Ceramic Grillworks two-tier swing rack

    Perpetual cooler of ice-cold beer

  • jaydub58jaydub58 Posts: 1,211
    A paver with something to allow just a bit of air flow between it and the base of the egg, and you should be just fine. 
    John in the Willamette Valley of Oregon
  • BGE Table Nest $27, way better
    Bristow, VA
    1 Lrg & 1 XL
  • bcranbcran Posts: 37
    edited September 2013

    I priced a granite remnant for the egg base and top of my table.  14"x14" base and 22"x24" top.  $950.  Blew me away...all they had to do was cut them out and finish one edge for my top.  I ended up using a paver I already had and finding a top off craigslist for $10.  I win!

  • I used the BGE base made specifically for tables. It allows air to flow under the egg, keeping your wood nice and safe.
  • Whatever you choose, make sure there is an air space between the egg bottom and the "stone".
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • BullibeBullibe Posts: 129
    edited September 2013
    A nearby granite company gives away the sink cutouts. Some are round but many are rectangular.
    Redneck Riviera, Gulf Shores, Alabama
  • Whatever you choose, make sure there is an air space between the egg bottom and the "stone".
    I think just about every egg I've seen is sitting directly on the paver or whatever. What should they be sitting on and does that affect the depth they are supposed to sit down in the table?
  • tndawg said:
    I think just about every egg I've seen is sitting directly on the paver or whatever. What should they be sitting on and does that affect the depth they are supposed to sit down in the table?
    Mine is and almost all other Egg owners I know have the same setup right on a paver with zero issues.  If you're building a table for a large, the Egg requires 15" depth from shelf to tabletop.  The paver I use is 2" thick so I just made the proper adjustment when building my table.  I went with 16" which gave me an extra inch just to be safe and it worked great.

    LBGE

    Cedar table w/granite top

    Ceramic Grillworks two-tier swing rack

    Perpetual cooler of ice-cold beer

  • jn_austinjn_austin Posts: 29
    edited September 2013
    I built a backyard kitchen with a spot for the BGE and used a slab of granite. From what I was told the egg could be placed directly on the granite. This is not a good thing to do. The first time I cooked pizza the granite cracked and had to be repaired. I then installed a table nest. Essentially it provides about 1-2" of air gap under the egg. Even with thick pavers I would not put the egg directly down on top. While the pavers will likely be OK I would not want to transfer that much heat through the medium and into a wood frame. My frame was concrete block so I didn't think I had an issue either. To be honest if I never cooked Pizza on the egg it would probably have been fine. But for real cooking be safe and use the spacer. image
  • jaydub58jaydub58 Posts: 1,211
    I have used the original ceramic feet that came with the egg for three years now.
    John in the Willamette Valley of Oregon
  • New here... I too am in the process of building our XL egg table.  Although I don't have a lot of experience with my table burning down or my granite cracking, knock on wood,  I second jn_austin. Use the table nest especially with the granite.  Granite is strong stuff but not as forgiving as a concrete paver. Knowing this ahead of time is good so that you can adjust for the extra two inches in height you will gain with the table nest.  I called Green Egg and they told me that their plans on their website are not for use with the table nest and that with their plans your egg would be raised 2 inches higher above the table top, but they do recommend the use of the table nest with wood tables.   We have 2cm granite under our XL with the table nest.  I pray that the 2cm granite will hold up.

  • bcran said:

    I priced a granite remnant for the egg base and top of my table.  14"x14" base and 22"x24" top.  $950.  Blew me away...all they had to do was cut them out and finish one edge for my top.  I ended up using a paver I already had and finding a top off craigslist for $10.  I win!

    I purchased 2-2cm granite pieces 25.5" x 25.5" from a local builders supply for $75 a piece. They have the top and one edge polished and rolled.  I took my angle grinder with a diamond bit and cut the pieces to fit my table.  I also used my angle grinder to round and polish the other three edges and they turned out nice, to me.  I also recommend checking Craigslist for granite pieces.
  • I went on Kijiji and found a granite place that was selling scraps for $1, any size. Cutting and edging was extra. I figured the cutting etc, would be $60-70+ for a cut. guy told me he would make a cut for $10. I found apiece that just needed one cut to fit my measurements and got it for $10. He didn't even charge me for the original $1. WOOO HOO.

     

    Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    Sledder, Quadder, Rock and Roller, Big Green Egg Smoker.

  • jaydub58 said:
    I have used the original ceramic feet that came with the egg for three years now.
    Man,that gap looks like a good place to warm tortillas!

    From the Georgia Mountains!
  • Just finished my table and, I too am trying to decide paver or table nest. I just found the feet that came with our Large three years ago. Has anyone used them on wood?

    tndawg said:
    I have started building a table for my two eggs and I have a question as I continue to look at pics of tables that have been posted on here. I can't decide on whether I want to put granite or a paver under the eggs. Do they both have the same ability to handle the heat from the bottom of the egg? I don't want to consider granite if it lets the wood get too hot. Any experiences or thoughts you can share? Thanks!

  • No matter what material you use, adding 4 fire bricks to the bottom of the egg to create a thermal buffer is an inexpensive option.
  • This is what I did...

    A few holes in the granite to let heat out
    image.jpg
    800 x 600 - 191K
    image.jpg
    2048 x 1536 - 1M
    image.jpg
    3264 x 2448 - 2M
    "COLD BEER, GRILLED RIBEYE & FROZEN TEQUILA"
  • jaydub58 said:
    I have used the original ceramic feet that came with the egg for three years now.
    I did the same thing with no paver under the egg for years, as recommended by my dealer. Got ready to do a clean burn and checked with the forum for a "how to". One reply was to put a paver  under the feet. Took the egg off the table and had a burn hole in the board under the egg the size of a grapefruit. That response to my ? saved my egg.    

    Alexander City,Al
  • I have a piece of granite under the nest that is 18"x18" and a piece that is flush with the top of the table that is 18" x "21 (see my avatar). Both including cuts were $100. I like the piece under the egg with the nest, I think it looks nicer, I would be concerned that a paver stone (16" x 16") might not be large enough to have the nest sit on top. Best of luck!
    Chris
    St. Louis, MO
    LBGE + cedar table
  • JRWhiteeJRWhitee Posts: 1,807
    jaydub58 said:
    I have used the original ceramic feet that came with the egg for three years now.
    I did the same thing with no paver under the egg for years, as recommended by my dealer. Got ready to do a clean burn and checked with the forum for a "how to". One reply was to put a paver  under the feet. Took the egg off the table and had a burn hole in the board under the egg the size of a grapefruit. That response to my ? saved my egg.    
    Same thing happened to me.
                                                                        
    _________________________________________________

    Large BGE 2006, Small BGE 2014, Adjustable Rig R&B, PSWoo3, Thermapen.
    Weber Gasser for the Wife. 
    Founding Member of the Green Man Group cooking team.
    Johns Creek, Georgia
  • KeeferKeefer Posts: 104
    Most granite countertop companies have a "bone yard" with leftover pieces, cut outs and mis-cuts. after buying the first piece of scrap fo $25, the owner now gives me whatever I want and encourages me to take more. I always show him pictures of my projects and he gets a kick out of how I use some of the pieces he has given me. (The rack of ribs probably didn't hurt our relationship either -lol)
  • bo31210bo31210 Posts: 228
    Check around on the granite pricing   I built a table in my deck earlier this year and used a 24 x 48 piece of granite on top.  Go them to give me the cut out that sits on the shelf.  Egg on the egg feet sit on that      My total investment was 225-250 but I thought pretty reasonable
    In the middle of Georgia!    Geaux Tigers!!!!!
  • jaydub58jaydub58 Posts: 1,211
    jaydub58 said:
    I have used the original ceramic feet that came with the egg for three years now.


    Oooops!  I didn't state that I used the ceramic feet on a single layer of three concrete pavers.

    No worries about heat there.

    John in the Willamette Valley of Oregon
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