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Who Likes Sirloin Steak?

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Comments

  • I love some aged sirloin, great value for a great steak, usually 7/lb. My local grocery (heb) has me spoiled on aged beef. Also love sirlion for kabobs.
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    Austin, Texas.  I'm the guy holding a beer.
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 1,308

    After eating some relatively low grade sirloin at Chili's last night (for the record, I didn't order it, it was someone else's leftover that got passed over to me) I realize that I should qualify my previous statement - and in doing so, reinforce what some others have said.

    I don't typically care for bottom sirloin but good, thick, high grade top sirloin has always been one of my favorite steaks.  As an example, while they occasionally miss the mark, the Outback Special at Outback Steakhouse has always been a good piece of meat for the money.  It was $7.99 for the full meal when I used to go their first and only restaurant in Tampa and I still like it better than most higher priced cuts at more expensive restaurants.  At this point, their prices have gone up and I can get my own meat from Costco and cook a better steak myself but this is just an example.

    However, a bad sirloin is not nearly as good as a bad tenderloin or ribeye or NY strip... so, as others have said, meat selection is probably more important when choosing sirloin than it is for more expensive cuts. 

    I had never really thought about sirloin this thoroughly - and it had dropped out of my rotation - but because of this forum I'll probably get some soon.  Thanks to all. 

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • AviatorAviator Posts: 1,404
    Foghorn is right. The other day I got a sirloin steak from whole foods that was grass fed. Was pretty expensive. Did it on the egg like I always do, it was hard, chewy and horrible.
    Back to Costco for meat. Never had a problem with Costco choice or prime.

    ______________________________________________ 

    Large and Small BGE, and a baby black Kub.

    And all the toys to make me look like a Gizmo Chef.

    >:)

    Chattanooga, TN.

     

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 7,210
    @foghorn
    The "Outback Special" used to be my go to in college. It was 9.99 for a 12 oz steak, 2 sides and a salad. I might try to recreate it on the egg. I agree with the rest of your post as well - the only time I can appreciate a steak at a restaurant is at high-end places on special occasions.
  • Ragtop99Ragtop99 Posts: 1,036
    Teaching SWMBO to do it is quite the time saver as well. Leaves you time to do other things instead of being at the store.
    I actually like going to the store on the weekend and selecting my meat.  It's part of the overall experience.  Nothing like walking in and seeing a great steak in the meat case and selecting the ones you want.  I've definitely changed cooks based upon what looks good that day.

    During the week, the wife can pick up chicken, hamburger, fish or even sirloins even we are going to cook it with a marinade.
    Cooking on an XL and Medium in Bethesda, MD.
  • Sirloin is the best for souvlaki and other "meat on a stick" recipes. I sort the steaks into those that will be grilled stand alone, those that will be cubed and those that will be thin sliced for stir fry. 

    @Foghorn and @SaltySam you are not alone, the story goes that Henry the VIII loved beef loin so much he Knighted it, hence we call it Sir Loin. 
    Delta B.C., Canuckistan - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • Sirloin is the best for souvlaki and other "meat on a stick" recipes. I sort the steaks into those that will be grilled stand alone, those that will be cubed and those that will be thin sliced for stir fry. 

    @Foghorn and @SaltySam you are not alone, the story goes that Henry the VIII loved beef loin so much he Knighted it, hence we call it Sir Loin. 
    Cough cough bu11$/!t

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Well - you could have at least provided the real origin of the name, @Little_Steven, sirloin originates from the French surlonge, or above the loin, where the cut comes from. 
    Delta B.C., Canuckistan - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • I could have but I don't speak French

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • I could have but I don't speak French
    Don't they have to label their meats in English AND French in Canada?
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • I could have but I don't speak French
    Don't they have to label their meats in English AND French in Canada?
    No, because then merchants in Quebec would have to use English. 
    Delta B.C., Canuckistan - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • yzziyzzi Posts: 1,139
    So go figure my brother in law called to come over for lunch since he won some steaks from work. Shows up with 10 pounds of sirloin from publix. Did the t-rex method today and it was a nice tasty cut of meat. I'll definitely pick up those primes now. image
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    3264 x 1840 - 2M
    Dunedin, FL
  • I could have but I don't speak French
    Don't they have to label their meats in English AND French in Canada?

    Surlonge is actually the biggest selling steak in the country.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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