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Issue with Large Egg table

Have had our egg and table for just about 2 years.  Somehow, this photo exaggerates the problem, which is a good thing for illustration purposes.  

We got our Egg and table as wedding gifts, so I'm not totally furious, but this table is constructed pretty horribly.  I understand that the majority/all of the weight is on one side of it, so it is prone to be a bit canted/leaned.  

My question is, I am planning to disassemble the whole thing, flip the table over, 'right' it, tighten all lag bolts and potentially add a "V" frame on the back to reinforce, using some 1x4's or 1x6's.  My latest thought was just just have the reinforcing wood on the side with the egg (picture a "V" right behind where the egg sits).  

Browsed the forum and couldn't find any help.  Any thoughts/experience/links would be much appreciated!

Comments

  • If lag bolts are really how its held together, thats a big part of your problem. You need bolt bolts, the kind with nuts, and washers and that dont rely on the wood itself to stay tight, but rather metal to metal contact (bolt &nut). Also, aligning the opening swing of your dome (the way it is generally meant to be) with the ash door may help too, since it appears that as it opens now, will put some odd, oblique stress on the least sturdy angle of your table and thats also contributing to your "lean".
    When I'm not Eggin', I'm scootin'   Eggin' and 'cueing from Temecula Ca; an hour from San Diego, an hour and five minutes from Palm Springs, and an hour and a half from Los Angeles (yeah, right. With THAT traffic?)
  • ok, I think they are 'bolt' bolts, as there are washers, nuts, etc. on it.  Good call on the funky oblique angle of the dome swing.  That certainly isn't helping the situation.  Dumb question, as the Egg isn't right in front of me: is it possible to move the hinge for the dome?  
  • That said, some re-engineering/reinforcements are in order. Bolts are adequately sized for the job at hand...and do they secure the meatiest (BBQ forum reference!) portion of the table and it's components?  I see a lot of drywall type screws, but no bolts of any kind in your picture...

    I think you'll loosen/rotate the lower band to line things up properly, then (carefully) retighten.
    When I'm not Eggin', I'm scootin'   Eggin' and 'cueing from Temecula Ca; an hour from San Diego, an hour and five minutes from Palm Springs, and an hour and a half from Los Angeles (yeah, right. With THAT traffic?)
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,024
    edited September 2013
    If I were you, I'd apply some Titebond III glue between the cross pieces and legs, then use 2 Spax lag screws - pre-drill the holes at each end of each cross piece (even though it says you don't have to).  Make sure you offset them a little so you don't collide with the bolts coming in at a 90 on the side of the table.  Use a clamp to hold the wood aligned when you glue and screw it together. 

    Having two bolts and glue will keep it true, you don't need the "V" supports.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • What you have looks like the BGE cypress table?  Is that correct?  I had one for 13 or so years and never had that issue.  Mine had galvanized carriage bolts holding it together.  My first thought?  Something looks out of square.  I would break out a square and check the perpendiculars.  The other thing that bothers me are the curved/bowed/warped boards on the end of the top itself.

    Disassembling and reassembling is probably your best bet...while doing so with that square I mentioned...haha.  The problem you may run into are waddled out bolt holes.  You may have to go larger diameter with some of the bolts.  Good luck!

  • RajunCajun said:

    The other thing that bothers me are the curved/bowed/warped boards on the end of the top itself.

    Disassembling and reassembling is probably your best bet...while doing so with that square I mentioned...haha.  The problem you may run into are waddled out bolt holes.  You may have to go larger diameter with some of the bolts.  Good luck!

    The boards on top (the 'decking'/table platform) are just stapled in, and I think they got bent when someone was putting the egg into the hole.  
    Gogogordy said:
    That said, some re-engineering/reinforcements are in order. Bolts are adequately sized for the job at hand...and do they secure the meatiest (BBQ forum reference!) portion of the table and it's components?  I see a lot of drywall type screws, but no bolts of any kind in your picture...


    The bolts are in the sides of the table (not visible from this angle)  I'm thinking per Rajuncajun's comment, that the bolts might have waddled out/enlarged the bolt holes from the movement/canting.  

    I'm just trying to figure out how to make it so the dome opens squarely (IIRC when I assembled the egg, there is only one spot to install the dome hinge.
  • If you are saying that there are locating pins on the bands and that is the only way to install the bands, you should see a dealer for replacement parts, whatever is needed to fix it.  The handle should be lined up with the lower vent.  My large is 12 years old and I have the old auto-lock hinge, but mine didn't have any sort of locating pins.  I can put my dome/base in any position I want to.
    The Naked Whiz
  • My comment regarding the waddled out holes are based on my complete disassembly of my BGE cypress table.  I reclaimed the wood and used it for a few projects.
  • I bought my table from JS Design in Collierville, TN  His tables include bracing in the form of triangles at the stress points.  I think you would do well to add something like that in your table re-design.

    image
    -Jody Newell (LBGE & finally a mini BGE!)
    Location:  Munford, TN  Homepage:  Shadow photo shadow.gif
  • dweebs0r said:
    His tables include bracing in the form of triangles at the stress points.  

    I'm pretty sure this is the exact one I have (?).  Do you have a pic of the triangles?  I am thinking one of the prior comments was right in that my open angle is causing the oblique stress on the table.  
  • photo images_long_zps68ddbeb1.jpg

    I circled the triangles I was talking about. Those are in all of the stressed corners and add alot more strength than the stock BGE-marketed tables.
    -Jody Newell (LBGE & finally a mini BGE!)
    Location:  Munford, TN  Homepage:  Shadow photo shadow.gif
  • jaydub58jaydub58 Posts: 1,221

    @dweebsOr, in looking at your pics, are those triangles lag-screwed into position?

    Can't see any sign of bolts there.

    Thanks

     

    John in the Willamette Valley of Oregon
  • The triangles fit flush against the bottom of the table top.  2 screws go directly into the board on the front and 2 screws are into the table leg using a pocket hole jig (Kreg jig) for each screw.
    -Jody Newell (LBGE & finally a mini BGE!)
    Location:  Munford, TN  Homepage:  Shadow photo shadow.gif
  • Hmm....I like this design.  A lot.  

    I wonder if simple steel "L" brackets would do the trick on mine?  Wouldn't be as handsome as those lovely isosceles triangles of course....
  • It would work but it wouldnt provide the same amount of strength that the triangles give you.  I personally have been looking for an excuse to buy a Kreg jig.  Its a great tool and you would need it for this project but could use use for so much more.
    -Jody Newell (LBGE & finally a mini BGE!)
    Location:  Munford, TN  Homepage:  Shadow photo shadow.gif
  • txav8rtxav8r Posts: 153
    Bolts are a heavy mechanical fastener.  Screws/nails/and small bolts are just a means to hold together until the glue dries!  The glue is a chemical fastener that makes two opposing surfaces a single surface, maintaining their rigidity and structural strength.  Use glue, it will add the rigidity your after...of course squaring it up will be necessary.  Kreg is a quality fastener, but again, glue it permanent and not subjected to the movement of the wood that a mechanical fastener is...especially outside.  I may use some pocket holes in my table build but glue will also be used.  Iove my kreg jig too!  But a bisquit joint is fast/accurate and certainly as strong.  Lots of ways to skin the cat!
    Just far enough north of DFW to be "rural"...and close enough to be urban, depending on my mood.
  • I just have to ask... Why is your handle off to one side and not square withe the table and inline with the lower vent?
    Texas Aggie transplanted in Georgia
    Large BGE, Small BGE, more accessories than I'm willing to tell the Mrs. about.

  • Your table is a simple parallelogram.  The only thing that is keeping it from racking are the fasteners and they loosen up over time, especially if you move the table.  The difference between a rectangle and parallelogram are the diagonals from corner to corner. You need to control the length of the diagonals.  Square up the table with a framing square or adjust the diagonals with a tape measure until they are even.   Corner brace triangles will work if you can secure them well or you can run two boards in an X from corner to corner.  Sheeting the entire back with plywood does the same thing.  If the table is racking front to back also, do the same on the ends. It will be rigid as a teen ager.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

         

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